[SOLVED] WIll this build work?

Oct 30, 2019
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Hello everyone! Since I'm a complete newb in PC building, and I am about to build my first one, I wanted to ask for your opinions on my choice of components. Mainly whether they will work fine together, any possible hint & tips or alternatives you may have.

Thank you in advance!

Setup:
GPU: MSI Radeon 5700
CPU: Ryzen 5 2600
CPU cooler: Cooler Master 212
MOBO: MSI B450 Tomahawk MAX
RAM: G.Skill TridentZ 3000mhz CL16
PSU: Corsair VS550 550W
SSD ADATA XPG SX8200 PRO 512GB PCLe x4 NVMe
HDD Seagate Barracuda 2tb
Case: Kolink Obervatory RGB

All of this will be displayed on a 27 inch 144hy AOC C27G1.

Please let me know what you think, especially about the PSU (is it sufficient and good choice), the case (will it fit all components nicely) and also about MOBO (will it perform well in this setup). Cheers!
 

PC Tailor

Distinguished
Herald
NVMe: to be honest it was my personal fanaberie to maximize speed of booting and video editing.
NVMe is only really faster in artificial benchmarks, you'll find even in video editing the difference is not noticeable unless it is perhaps constant incredibly large data processing, or NVMe to NVMe transfer. Just if there is a good SATA SSD on offer, then there's no need to spend the extra money. It may be worth seeing what the 660p is like locally, as it's usually the best bang for buck. But obviously that's location dependant.

For 212 - I've seen plenty of videos and threads and honestly i got an impression that ot is worth the price.
Absolutely fair enough, just wanted to cover all points :)
The stock can overclock a bit depending on your ambient temperatures. You may want aftermarket for overclocking, but there's also no harm in trying stock then upgrading if you're not happy.

The 212 is excellent value for money so perfectly understandable - just isn't much difference now.
 
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PC Tailor

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Herald
Welcome to the forums my friend!

  • What is your main usage?
  • What is your overall budget and currency?
  • You don't need the MAX version of the B450 being as you are going for a 2nd Gen Ryzen. However if it's cheaper, no reason why not.
  • The VS is Corsairs lowest tier PSU, so whilst it's still better than many (especially the newer VS models) it's still not recommended for higher load systems as ultimately it's a very entry level, budget PSU. For the money you are spending on the rest of your system, you should get a better quality unit. bare minimum a CX IMO, however there are better than this also.
  • Do you need a third party cooler straight away? The Ryzen will come with a stock cooler.
  • Any reason why you have to have NVMe over standard SATA? And if you do stick to NVME, usually the Intel 660p is best bang for buck.
 
Reactions: Lucivarr

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Only real difference between the VS and CX is 80+ rating. Quality wise, they are about the same thing now, but because of that rating, the VS is often lower priced, especially in the 230v Indo-Asiatic markets. Corsair has definitely upped its game and I'd have no issues putting either up against a Seasonic S12-II.

Still on the low end of the ladder. You'll really want to match up the ability of the psu to handle the demands put forth by the cpu/gpu, the VS/CX are designed more for low end gamer or office type pcs, and your components are not low-end gamer by any stretch. Corsair TXM at a minimum, Seasonic Focus/Core, Corsair RM/RMx would be advisable.

You can wear cloth tennis shoes on a construction site, but there are proven reasons why full leather, steel toe work boots are preferred/demanded. Same goes for the psu.

Hyper212 isn't that much better than the included stock cooler, roughly the same temps, but is a little quieter under heavy loads. I'd run the stock cooler initially, then decide if the upgrade is worth it, or maybe save up some more for a better cooler. Right now it's more of a luxury/want than a necessity.
 
Oct 30, 2019
4
1
15
0
Welcome to the forums my friend!

  • What is your main usage?
  • What is your overall budget and currency?
  • You don't need the MAX version of the B450 being as you are going for a 2nd Gen Ryzen. However if it's cheaper, no reason why not.
  • The VS is Corsairs lowest tier PSU, so whilst it's still better than many (especially the newer VS models) it's still not recommended for higher load systems as ultimately it's a very entry level, budget PSU. For the money you are spending on the rest of your system, you should get a better quality unit. bare minimum a CX IMO, however there are better than this also.
  • Do you need a third party cooler straight away? The Ryzen will come with a stock cooler.
  • Any reason why you have to have NVMe over standard SATA? And if you do stick to NVME, usually the Intel 660p is best bang for buck.
Thanks for the warm welcome! To answer your questions:

Main usage - 1080p gaming (radeon choice to secure high FPS for future games) and casual video editing.
Budget: excluding monitor 1k eur, but I'll deduct VAT from the purchase so including monitor this setup was roughly 980eur
MOBO: I wanted to go MAX having in mind a possible change for 3600 or higher in the future (if it makes sense in case of MAX version)
PSU: Noted, I'll have a look for higher end products
CPU Cooler: I've read that 212 will do better with light OC and provide overall lower temps (to mitigate any heat problems)
NVMe: to be honest it was my personal fanaberie to maximize speed of booting and video editing.


Only real difference between the VS and CX is 80+ rating. Quality wise, they are about the same thing now, but because of that rating, the VS is often lower priced, especially in the 230v Indo-Asiatic markets. Corsair has definitely upped its game and I'd have no issues putting either up against a Seasonic S12-II.

Still on the low end of the ladder. You'll really want to match up the ability of the psu to handle the demands put forth by the cpu/gpu, the VS/CX are designed more for low end gamer or office type pcs, and your components are not low-end gamer by any stretch. Corsair TXM at a minimum, Seasonic Focus/Core, Corsair RM/RMx would be advisable.

You can wear cloth tennis shoes on a construction site, but there are proven reasons why full leather, steel toe work boots are preferred/demanded. Same goes for the psu.

Hyper212 isn't that much better than the included stock cooler, roughly the same temps, but is a little quieter under heavy loads. I'd run the stock cooler initially, then decide if the upgrade is worth it, or maybe save up some more for a better cooler. Right now it's more of a luxury/want than a necessity.
Hello as well and thank you for feedback!
As above, for PSU I'll have a look on your proposals. For 212 - I've seen plenty of videos and threads and honestly i got an impression that ot is worth the price. But since i don't plan to go crazy into OC or heavy load tasks immediately i guess your tip to start with stock is valid!
 

PC Tailor

Distinguished
Herald
NVMe: to be honest it was my personal fanaberie to maximize speed of booting and video editing.
NVMe is only really faster in artificial benchmarks, you'll find even in video editing the difference is not noticeable unless it is perhaps constant incredibly large data processing, or NVMe to NVMe transfer. Just if there is a good SATA SSD on offer, then there's no need to spend the extra money. It may be worth seeing what the 660p is like locally, as it's usually the best bang for buck. But obviously that's location dependant.

For 212 - I've seen plenty of videos and threads and honestly i got an impression that ot is worth the price.
Absolutely fair enough, just wanted to cover all points :)
The stock can overclock a bit depending on your ambient temperatures. You may want aftermarket for overclocking, but there's also no harm in trying stock then upgrading if you're not happy.

The 212 is excellent value for money so perfectly understandable - just isn't much difference now.
 
Reactions: Lucivarr
Oct 30, 2019
4
1
15
0
NVMe is only really faster in artificial benchmarks, you'll find even in video editing the difference is not noticeable unless it is perhaps constant incredibly large data processing, or NVMe to NVMe transfer. Just if there is a good SATA SSD on offer, then there's no need to spend the extra money. It may be worth seeing what the 660p is like locally, as it's usually the best bang for buck. But obviously that's location dependant.


Absolutely fair enough, just wanted to cover all points :)
The stock can overclock a bit depending on your ambient temperatures. You may want aftermarket for overclocking, but there's also no harm in trying stock then upgrading if you're not happy.

The 212 is excellent value for money so perfectly understandable - just isn't much difference now.

Makes sense, thank you! And would you have any comment or advise on the case? Its currently 68 eur and I've read that it's a decent choice without significant drawbacks.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Cases, like keyboards and mice, are highly personal, you gotta look at it, build in it, fix it, change it etc, we don't. The fractal design R5 was touted as an excellent case, one of the best for a while now, but suffers from lousy airflow due to the enclosed front when the door is shut. It's also seriously heavy. According to whom? I love the case, it's been wonderful, no airflow issues and I like it heavy, light cases feel cheap. So opinions are going to vary with any case, unless it's obvious junk or totally wrong for the Op.
 
Reactions: Lucivarr

Giannis_Mag

Commendable
May 24, 2017
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As other commenters said,go for a better psu (at leasr CX550M from corsair). Also the 212 is excellent budget choice and you will be able to hit 3.9Ghz stable and still be quiter than the stock. Also make sure you add fans for better airflow.
 

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