[SOLVED] Win 10 1909 20H2 .iso file is too large for DVD Installation?

clutchc

Titan
Ambassador
I was using the Media Creation Tool to download/burn the above .iso to DVD. (Don't ask why)
But a standard 4.7GB DVD is too small for the .ISO files as per the burner routine in W10. Does a standard optical drive/burner do single sided, double density disks? Or does one need a special burner for them. It's been a while since I dealt with disks.
 
Mar 1, 2021
2
0
20
1
you would need a double density disk which also requires a special burner

why not just use an USB? 8GB usbs are pretty cheap
 
Mar 1, 2021
2
0
20
1
you would need a double density disk which also requires a special burner

why not just use an USB? 8GB usbs are pretty cheap
 

gardenman

Admirable
Moderator
It probably depends upon the drive itself. Name brand / model number would be useful, so that info could be looked up.

My 11 year old system won't boot from a USB flash drive. I do have a blu-ray disc drive though.

Assuming your PC can't boot from a flash drive, you could use PLOP Boot Manager. Basically you put PLOP on a CD, boot to it, and it will let you boot from a flash drive (even if your BIOS doesn't support it).
 
It probably depends upon the drive itself. Name brand / model number would be useful, so that info could be looked up.

My 11 year old system won't boot from a USB flash drive. I do have a blu-ray disc drive though.

Assuming your PC can't boot from a flash drive, you could use PLOP Boot Manager. Basically you put PLOP on a CD, boot to it, and it will let you boot from a flash drive (even if your BIOS doesn't support it).
Plop can be put in the boot menu and the installation of windows will automatically delete it again.
 
Reactions: gardenman
Mar 1, 2021
2
0
20
1
I was using the Media Creation Tool to download/burn the above .iso to DVD. (Don't ask why)
But a standard 4.7GB DVD is too small for the .ISO files as per the burner routine in W10. Does a standard optical drive/burner do single sided, double density disks? Or does one need a special burner for them. It's been a while since I dealt with disks.

If you are trying to install Win 10 onto a very old computer that has a BIOS rather than UEFI, Windows Media Creation tool generally does not like to play nice.

You can use Rufus to create a bootable USB drive if you mess around with the settings a bit. I managed to install Win10 onto a computer from 2008 using it.

Format your USB to FAT32 first.

Then in Rufus:

  • change the Partition Scheme to MBR
  • Target System to BIOS (or UEFI-CSM),
- in Advanced Drive Properties:
- Add fixes for old BIOS
- Use Rufus MBR with BIOS ID

- in Advanced Format options:
- Quick Format
- Create extended label and icon files


that should create a bootable drive compatible with old systems
 

clutchc

Titan
Ambassador
Thanks for all the replies. Yeah, ancient 775-era Asus motherboard didn't play nice with the 2-month old Media Creation tool USB flash drive I was using, so I tried DVD... unaware that the latest Win10 installation pkg was too big for my single sided disk.

But all worked out OK finally. I made a fresh W10 install USB with Media Creation Tool and the old board accepted it this time. Thanks again.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY