Question Win10 to Win7 UNC Connections

Jan 26, 2021
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Hi all,
In recent months, connections from our Win10 computers are having trouble retaining connections to Win7 clients. I know the Win7 PCs should be upgraded/replaced, but this is in the point of sale industry and a change like that is a massive undertaking. My method of networking in these rather basic configurations has always been to make a matching username/password on the client machine as the one on the host PC connecting to it. Lately however, even with stored credentials like this, I can make a connection for a while, and then at random, it seems to lose it, and accessing the client via a \\unc command prompts for username and password. I've searched up and down the internet for anyone else who's come across this, but must be using the wrong search terms because other than some password bugs with Chrome and Edge, I come up empty. And yet I've seen it enough in our various sites that I imagine it must be a rather commonplace problem.
Has anyone come across this and have any advice?
 
Jan 26, 2021
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If these connections are WiFi connections, that is most likely your disconnection problem. Use wired connections if possible. If not totally possible, used wired connections where possible to reduce load on WiFi.
Thanks, but this isn't a matter of not being able to find the machines, it's that it's reverting back to prompting for username/password. Upon an initial boot of Windows, the connection is made without issue and I can browse the share, and then a few minutes later, if I try \\computername, I am prompted for username and password. It doesn't seem to store credentials properly.
 
Thanks, but this isn't a matter of not being able to find the machines, it's that it's reverting back to prompting for username/password. Upon an initial boot of Windows, the connection is made without issue and I can browse the share, and then a few minutes later, if I try \\computername, I am prompted for username and password. It doesn't seem to store credentials properly.
WiFi is just radio so anything that causes interference with the radio signal can cause the disconnection if it is strong enough. And it doesn't have to be in your location. The source of the interference can be in a neighbor's abode. I saw one case where someone having trouble was under the flight path of a newly opened airport runway and the planes were causing all kind of problems.
https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2017/03/802-eleventy-what-a-deep-dive-into-why-wi-fi-kind-of-sucks/
 

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