Question Windows 10 after debloat Edge browser problem

Jun 18, 2019
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I debloated my Windows 10 and everything works perfectly except two new apps that I installed that require me to login.
The login page tries to open explorer/edge but after debloat The page can not reach connection.
So now I need to re- enable my explorer/edge to allow this two apps to connect to internet.

How can I do it ?
Thanks
 

britechguy

Prominent
Jul 2, 2019
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Well, can anything reach the internet?

I am trying to get my head around an app triggering a web browser. That's generally not done, and logging in is via the app itself.

The easiest way to debloat Windows 10 is to install what comes straight from Microsoft.
 
Jun 18, 2019
3
0
10
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Well, can anything reach the internet?

I am trying to get my head around an app triggering a web browser. That's generally not done, and logging in is via the app itself.

The easiest way to debloat Windows 10 is to install what comes straight from Microsoft.
The app ticktick


Also getstation has same problem

Everything works and never had any problem.
 

britechguy

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Jul 2, 2019
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Well, while I wouldn't go so far as a completely clean reinstall as a first step, I agree that attempting to remove components that are tightly bound to Windows is a very, very bad idea. Neither Edge or Internet Explorer takes up much of anything other than disk space if not used. If it ships with Windows it should be allowed to lie fallow if unused and any "tweaking" done only via user settings commonly available.

That being said, what I'd do next is:

Using SFC (System File Checker) and DISM (Deployment Imaging Servicing and Management) to Repair Windows 8 & 10

then, if that doesn't do it: Doing a Windows 10 Repair Install or Feature Update Using the Windows 10 ISO file

If either one works, do not attempt to "debloat" by removing web browsers that have been tightly bound with Windows for a very long time.
 

Ketchup79

Great
Aug 7, 2019
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If Edge isn't available in apps, it should be available in the store. Some apps can trigger themselves to call up a specific program, no matter how you have your defaults set.
 
Last edited:

Mandark

Distinguished
Well, while I wouldn't go so far as a completely clean reinstall as a first step, I agree that attempting to remove components that are tightly bound to Windows is a very, very bad idea. Neither Edge or Internet Explorer takes up much of anything other than disk space if not used. If it ships with Windows it should be allowed to lie fallow if unused and any "tweaking" done only via user settings commonly available.

That being said, what I'd do next is:

Using SFC (System File Checker) and DISM (Deployment Imaging Servicing and Management) to Repair Windows 8 & 10

then, if that doesn't do it: Doing a Windows 10 Repair Install or Feature Update Using the Windows 10 ISO file

If either one works, do not attempt to "debloat" by removing web browsers that have been tightly bound with Windows for a very long time.
Windows repair installs rarely ever work that’s why I said to reinstall clean and he didn’t like my answer but too bad I’m correct

Clean reinstall windows and don’t try to remove anything that belongs there.

In fact when you try to remove Internet explorer it tells you that windows won’t work properly!!!
 

britechguy

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Jul 2, 2019
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Windows repair installs rarely ever work
Well, we shall simply have to agree to disagree. The repair install using the ISO file is one of the miracles of Windows 10 as far as I'm concerned, and because of them I have very, very seldom had to resort to a completely clean reinstall.

My most frequent use for a completely clean reinstall is not to fix errors, but to prepare a system for a transfer of ownership, followed by a run of a drive wiper on free space.

I never have, and never will recommend doing a completely clean install as the first choice for solving a problem. It's like using a bomb to kill a fly.

My experience since the pre-release insider days leads me to use the following, in order:

  1. Using SFC (System File Checker) and DISM (Deployment Imaging Servicing and Management) to Repair Windows 8 & 10
  2. Doing a Windows 10 Repair Install or Feature Update Using the Windows 10 ISO file
  3. Doing a completely clean (re)install of Windows 10.
I'd much rather have "wasted time" doing the first two, even if circumstances were to make me resort to the third. It's a massive waste of time to reconfigure a system from scratch when there are excellent options that frequently prevent one from having to do so at all.
 
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Mandark

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lol, disagree is right. but whatever
edited

as for "de-bloating (removing built in services and apps and such" I used to do it with older OSs and it always proved the wrong thing, because everything is interconnected. it's just not worth it to ever do it, period. all i might do is uninstall all games and do disk cleanup
 

Colif

Titan
Moderator
How did you do it is perhaps a starting point to figure out what fixes to suggest

I don't understand why you would do it anyway. Only reason to want to shrink win 10 is if you running on 32gb of storage and given USAFRet already has win 10 running on that and likely didn't remove any of windows core components to do it, I am back to asking why. Storage is cheap, just get more.

If its just registry tweaks, you could simply run system restore as it would roll back registry changes.
 

britechguy

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Jul 2, 2019
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How did you do it is perhaps a starting point to figure out what fixes to suggest
I think we've all been awaiting further detailed input on that count, which has not been forthcoming.

All of the general advice has been given, and no more specific advice can be with an information vacuum.

As most of us who've haunted tech support forums for decades know: Assistance is a two-way street.
 

Mandark

Distinguished
you use Control Panel->Uninstall a Program then on left, use Turn on/off Features, you can turn off IE, which is a mistake (can't then view any compiled help files!) and I am not sure but I think there is a powershell script to remove Edge out on the web
 

Colif

Titan
Moderator
you use Control Panel->Uninstall a Program then on left, use Turn on/off Features, you can turn off IE, which is a mistake (can't then view any compiled help files!) and I am not sure but I think there is a powershell script to remove Edge out on the web
there are scripts to do all sorts of things on web, and likely a youtube video about them as well, it doesn't mean its smart to run them.
 
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Mandark

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Colif

Titan
Moderator
I debloated my Windows 10 and everything works perfectly except two new apps that I installed that require me to login.
The login page tries to open explorer/edge but after debloat The page can not reach connection.
So now I need to re- enable my explorer/edge to allow this two apps to connect to internet.

How can I do it ?
Thanks
it has been pointed out to me that certain applications use parts of edge or IE for their login process so you will need to leave both re enabled in future if you want to use those apps.
 

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