[SOLVED] Windows 10 BSOD endless BIOS loop.

Siller

Reputable
Dec 11, 2016
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Hey All!

Having a weird problem here with my new build and was hoping someone might know what the deal is here. I recently built a new computer after my old one from 4 years ago was starting to show its age.

Symptoms: Randomly (While under full load or just watching YouTube) will crash to a BSOD but the screen with the captcha only lasts for about 1 second so I never have a chance of getting a picture of it. And I can't premeditate with my camera because it crashes randomly and only about 4 times in the 2 weeks I've had the PC. One time it happened the screen stopped in the middle of call of duty cold war and it made this terribly loud buzzing sound on repeat over and over like my PC got cursed or something. I hard reset it and since then it has happened except one time but it wasn't stuck on a loop it just went straight to blue screen after making the same noise for only a second or two and after I saw bluescreen it was gone.

Normally after a crash it loads straight into what I assume is the windows repair tool? It gives me the option of installing windows 10 and to change the language. Normally I will just restart it by pressing the power button waiting 15-30 seconds and turning it back on, when it loads back in it will be fine I'll load into windows and it won't happen again for another day or two or three! And a couple of other times Instead of it loading windows after I restart it from windows repair tool it will keep going into BIOS never loading into windows 10. So I'm looking through my BIOS and I see one of my SSD isn't showing up so I the back panel off and check them and the PSU. They were plugged in fine it seemed I pushed them in to be sure but I didn't notice the wire coming out at all. I restart PC and boom works fine. I feel like I'm losing my mind I just wish I could catch that captcha I almost want to set up a video and record my screen. Any help would be much appreciated.

Thanks for reading!


Side Note: Temps under load are around 65-75 degrees when its not under load its around 48-55 I've been religiously checking these temps when I'm gaming to make sure. One time I checked the temps 15 minutes before it crashed and it was around 68 degrees. I do have a lot of airflow so I can't imagine it's heat related.



PC Specs
CPU - Ryzen 9 3900X
Graphics Card - 1070 Ti FTW
MOBO - MAG B550 Tomahawk
RAM - 2x32GB DDR4-3600
Power Supply - 850w gold plus power supply
Storage- M.2 drives and SSD for storage
Air Flow- 5 case fans and a Cooler Master heat sink.
 

Danra

Distinguished
May 25, 2005
567
26
19,440
131
Turn off the computer and if the power supply has a switch at the back turn it off then push the computer power button and hold it for 20 seconds to discharge residual voltage. All good power supplies have an on/off switch. Make sure you do this every time you remove or add a piece of hardware, for safety sake. And, make sure you touch an unpainted portion of the case before removing or installing anything. This will keep the computer grounded and touching the case will discharge any electricity in your body [ESD].

Disconnect EVERYTHING except CPU and its fan and POST speaker. Boot it up and listen for the post code then look it up on MSI's motherboard web site [I don't think that motherboard has digital read out post codes]. If you can't use that, install the video card and nothing else except the CPU and see if you get the proper post code [should be RAM error]. If you don't have a speaker for the BIOS post codes you should get one, they are cheap. If you can't figure out the problem with the CPU and GPU installed, install one stick of RAM and try booting into BIOS, while in BIOS look to see that everything is properly recognized - and if RAM not set to AUTO, do it, set it at Auto until the diagnostics are completed.

Shut the computer down and start plugging one fan in at a time then reboot the computer after each fan is installed. If there is no problem, after shutting the PSU off and grounding yourself, install the next stick of RAM and see if you can get into BIOS, again, look to see if everything is recognized. Next, install the boot drive. Enter BIOS and see if everything is recognized. If so, try to boot into Windows. If Windows functions properly shut the computer down and install one thing at a time, any remaining hardware.

Diagnostics can be a pain.
 

Danra

Distinguished
May 25, 2005
567
26
19,440
131
Turn off the computer and if the power supply has a switch at the back turn it off then push the computer power button and hold it for 20 seconds to discharge residual voltage. All good power supplies have an on/off switch. Make sure you do this every time you remove or add a piece of hardware, for safety sake. And, make sure you touch an unpainted portion of the case before removing or installing anything. This will keep the computer grounded and touching the case will discharge any electricity in your body [ESD].

Disconnect EVERYTHING except CPU and its fan and POST speaker. Boot it up and listen for the post code then look it up on MSI's motherboard web site [I don't think that motherboard has digital read out post codes]. If you can't use that, install the video card and nothing else except the CPU and see if you get the proper post code [should be RAM error]. If you don't have a speaker for the BIOS post codes you should get one, they are cheap. If you can't figure out the problem with the CPU and GPU installed, install one stick of RAM and try booting into BIOS, while in BIOS look to see that everything is properly recognized - and if RAM not set to AUTO, do it, set it at Auto until the diagnostics are completed.

Shut the computer down and start plugging one fan in at a time then reboot the computer after each fan is installed. If there is no problem, after shutting the PSU off and grounding yourself, install the next stick of RAM and see if you can get into BIOS, again, look to see if everything is recognized. Next, install the boot drive. Enter BIOS and see if everything is recognized. If so, try to boot into Windows. If Windows functions properly shut the computer down and install one thing at a time, any remaining hardware.

Diagnostics can be a pain.
 

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