[SOLVED] Windows 10 lowering my overclock

harpnart

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Jan 29, 2018
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I have a B85M-DS3H-A gigabyte motherboard and an i5 4670K, which I've overclocked in my bios to 4.3 GHz. In the BIOS, it correctly displays this clock, but when I boot into Windows 10 and check CPU-Z, it's at 4.2 GHz. How do I prevent this from happening?
 

lordmogul

Honorable
Jun 14, 2014
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I both CPU-Z screenshots it shows the multi at 42x (despite showing a maximum of 43x and 45x), looks more like it gets limited somewhere else. Might be the max CPU power state in windows power plan or some other software.
 

harpnart

Commendable
Jan 29, 2018
7
0
1,510
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I both CPU-Z screenshots it shows the multi at 42x (despite showing a maximum of 43x and 45x), looks more like it gets limited somewhere else. Might be the max CPU power state in windows power plan or some other software.
I don't think I have any software that would limit. My windows power plan is on high performance.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
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Could be multiple things. Some motherboards, bios lists BCLK as 100.00 and yet if you check cpu-z it'll come back as 99.0 - 100.9 at times. That can even change with cpu-z editions. I've run the original vs asus rog vs msi editions and there are differences. Even versions differences can have different results.

You assume 100 numbers, as in the OC is 4200 MHz for a 4.2GHz or 4300MHz for 4.3GHz, but honestly if the BCLK is a little whacked out, you could see 4249MHz as 4.2GHz and 4251MHz as a 4.3GHz OC, far less than the 2-3%.
 

hotaru.hino

Prominent
Sep 1, 2020
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Measuring clock speeds accurately isn't a trivial task. You could go by what you set in BIOS, but that's just a number in some CMOS storage device, not the actual clock speed. You could try doing frequency counting, but even then oscillators are not perfect and clocks will drift pretty badly (I had a microcontroller drift minutes per hour in a basic test).

Honestly, as long as the reported speed is within spitting distance (like <5%), it's probably fine.
 
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Karadjgne

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Nobody likes the term 'Margin of Error' but everybody must assume one, especially given the speeds of today's processors, ram, quality control on components and materials etc. Most having to deal with such would prefer 5% or less, but if it's 6% in reality, the only fix is new mobo, cpu, gpu etc.

Sometimes 'Good Enough' is just that, good enough.
 
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