Windows 10 not activating

Jakob_kopkop

Commendable
Aug 1, 2016
24
0
1,510
0
I have a legit windows 10 key that I got from my old computer, but it won't let me activate windows. What should I go?
 
G

Guest

Guest
By default, Windows 10 builds are pre-keyed, meaning, you do not have to enter a product key and should not be prompted to enter one as long as you upgraded from an activated Windows 7 or Windows 8 or Windows 8.1 license or Windows 10 Preview build

If you are prompted to enter a product key, click Do this later and give it a few days, Windows 10 will activate automatically.

 

Colif

Titan
Moderator
Legit version from old PC? Was it an upgrade, how much of old PC is in new one?


which version of win 10 are you on?
right click start
choose run...
type winver

if it says 1607, right click This PC on desktop
choose properties
on next screen at bottom is a section called activation., Since you not activatd, there should be options here to contact Microsoft - you will need to contact them and sort it out

If you not on 1607, go to Here and press update now. This downloads the upgrade assistant, run it to update win 10 to 1607, and then follow the steps above to contact windows

You cannot contact them without having latest version installed - its just how it is.
 

Jakob_kopkop

Commendable
Aug 1, 2016
24
0
1,510
0


I upgrade to windows 10 from windows 7
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator


And you were trying to use the W7 key? Yeah, that won't happen - the only way to move W10 is tying it to your MS as I linked - and Colif has summarized how to confirm you're in a position to do it.


Mark, that won't necessarily work. With a 'significant hardware change', it won't auto-activate.

Given the OP refers to it as a "new computer", I doubt there's much of the old computer in it (maybe the storage etc) - but MS is still seeing it as a 'new computer' too.

Tying it to the MS account used though, should allow it to be reactivated as I linked (and Colif detailed what to do beforehand).
 

Colif

Titan
Moderator
He will need to contact them as the process of swapping the key requires him to have linked digital entitlement to email address before swapping the motherboard so his entitlement is probably still currently attached to old motherboard. (note, if he used his MSA to login and was on 1607 before upgrade, he might be okay with this part)

Then it all depends how much is new as to whether Microsoft will let him move it. We a little unsure how much you can change and keep entitlement, as the DE is for the PC, not the user. its lifetime of PC< not user.
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator


If nothing else, MS is consistent - there's still no definition of "significant hardware change" as far as I can see, which just confuses the situation.

While the DE for the PC, not the user makes total sense, I can't see anywhere MS expressly state that Colif, do you have link?

They say:
you can use the Activation troubleshooter to help reactivate Windows
But, these two caveats specifically are interesting:
The type of device you’re activating doesn’t match the type of device you linked to your digital license.

You reached the limit on the number of times you can reactivate Windows on your device.
 

Colif

Titan
Moderator
it also won't activate if its never been activated on device before.

So all new parts and it won't run, unless you have retail of course. Has to be some advantage to paying more for it.

We not sure how many parts you can swap before it deactivates, though its no longer guaranteed to happen if you swap motherboards, that is one good change.
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
While "all new parts" and it won't activate makes sense, I don't see where MS are stating that Colif?

It makes reference to 'your device' and 'the same device' etc..... but they don't define what a 'device' is, at least not directly.

The motherboard swap is a great change, but makes the situation a little more confusing than it ever way.

Previously: Same motherboard, you should be able to swap out everything else (although not in one fell swoop), and still activate/reactivate.

Now: You can change the motherboard. You can probably change a couple of extra components too at the same time, and still activate/reactivate. But potentially, if those two/three components are motherboard/CPU/RAM, then it's a different device??

At least previously it was fairly clear than motherboard = device.
 

Colif

Titan
Moderator
If you’re signed in using the correct Microsoft account, here are some additional reasons why you can’t reactivate Windows:

The edition of Windows on your device doesn’t match the edition of Windows you linked to your digital license.
The type of device you’re activating doesn’t match the type of device you linked to your digital license.
Windows was never activated on your device.
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/20530/windows-10-reactivating-after-hardware-change

last option there. It checks the PC and sees if its product code is anywhere near close the one previously recorded against DE. Product code the mysterious code made up of parts of the PC it is installed on, they very secretive about what it includes.

as for rest of your question, see step 4 of reasons it won't activate
You reached the limit on the number of times you can reactivate Windows on your device.
I assume the number goes down based on changes made over time. I doubt it goes down if you reinstall on same hardware.
 

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