News Windows 10 Still More Popular Than Windows 11, Two Years Later

eye4bear

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Jul 12, 2018
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Personally, I CAN'T upgrade to Windows 11. Neither my PC at the office nor my Windows 10 laptop at home qualify to update. Both work just fine and I am sure could run Windows 11 just fine, but it appears the PC makers got MS to build in some arbitrary hardware requirements. As we all learned when MS accidentally sent out an update awhile back that allowed PCs that didn't "qualify" to upgrade and guess what, they all ran just fine, thus proving the requirements are mostly BS to increase new PC sales. Basically I will get Windows 11 only when one of these two PCs die or reach EOL for Windows 10.
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
A LARGE part of this is there is no real impetus to move from 10 to 11.

When 10 was released, it was a great relief for many to get off the 8/8.1 problem.

With 11, it is so similar to 10, there is no real issue.


I'd wager the majority of WIn 11 installs are on systems bought with it, in the last 2 years..
Of my 5x house systems, 2 are Win 11, 3 on Win 10.
The 2x Win 11 boxes started as 11, the Surface laptop came from the store.
The other 3 Win10 systems...there is no real hurry to change, even though all 3 are Win 11 capable.
 

bigdragon

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Oct 19, 2011
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I'm not opposed to change -- I'm opposed to a GUI that slows me down, adds extra clicks, lacks flexibility, and hides content from me. I happily adopted Windows 7 and 10 when they became available because they made major usability improvements compared to their predecessors. The same can't be said for Windows 8 or 11. I don't need an AI copilot -- I need Microsoft to help me get the most out of my creative apps, communication tools, games, and development solutions. I think Microsoft has been too distracted chasing shiny objects.
 
Found a cheap gaming laptop with 8 gigabytes of ram and a Geforce 3050 for $650 last year.

Came with Windows 11 and even with removing all the bloatware it was sitting at like 5.5/8 gigabytes of ram at idle.

Re-imaging to Windows 10 and it uses 3.8/8 gigabytes ram usage!

Should probably upgrade the ram but as long as you don't have any other programs open, like Chrome, games run great.

Edit: Dell G15 5525 to be precise
 
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hedwar2011

Distinguished
Found a cheap gaming laptop with 8 gigabytes of ram and a Geforce 3050 for $650 last year.

Came with Windows 11 and even with removing all the bloatware it was sitting at like 5.5/8 gigabytes of ram at idle.

Re-imaging to Windows 10 and it uses 3.8/8 gigabytes ram usage!

Should probably upgrade the ram but as long as you don't have any other programs open, like Chrome, games run great.

Edit: Dell G15 5525 to be precise
It's all those crazy ads that they have appearing in every folder, menu, and orafice in Windows 11. It is such a resource hog.
 
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emike09

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I quite enjoy W11. I like the aesthetics and improvements to small things like File Explorer. I even prefer the balance of having the start menu centered. At first, I hated the centered menu and went back to left-based to make it easier to click the start button, but then figured I use the keyboard shortcut 99% of the time anyways.

I had to do a registry hack to bring back the right-click context menu. I can't stand the new context menus. I wish they'd provide a setting to do this without modifying the registry.

Feature-wise for gaming, auto-HDR is about the only thing that W11 gives me that W10 doesn't. I'm 100% positive that's a marketing thing from MS, but it is what it is. Performance-wise, I've got some of the best hardware money can buy, so it runs great for me; a few extra GB for the OS out of my 64GB is fine. Benchmarks between W10 and W11 on high-end hardware are almost exactly the same.

I enjoy embracing change, even if I don't like it. As soon as something new comes out, I want to learn it in and out. The only times I didn't enjoy the changes at all was Windows ME and Windows 8. Screw those OS's.
 
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hedwar2011

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I quite enjoy W11. I like the aesthetics and improvements to small things like File Explorer. I even prefer the balance of having the start menu centered. At first, I hated the centered menu and went back to left-based to make it easier to click the start button, but then figured I use the keyboard shortcut 99% of the time anyways.

I had to do a registry hack to bring back the right-click context menu. I can't stand the new context menus. I wish they'd provide a setting to do this without modifying the registry.

Feature-wise for gaming, auto-HDR is about the only thing that W11 gives me that W10 doesn't. I'm 100% positive that's a marketing thing from MS, but it is what it is. Performance-wise, I've got some of the best hardware money can buy, so it runs great for me; a few extra GB for the OS out of my 64GB is fine. Benchmarks between W10 and W11 on high-end hardware are almost exactly the same.

I enjoy embracing change, even if I don't like it. As soon as something new comes out, I want to learn it in and out. The only times I didn't enjoy the changes at all was Windows ME and Windows 8. Screw those OS's.
That's why Windows ME stood for Mistake Edition....no one liked it.
 

emike09

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That's why Windows ME stood for Mistake Edition....no one liked it.
I mean, a fair bit of what we loved about XP matured from ME, guess they had to start somewhere. I wish MS would release a version of W11 that was an interim between Windows Server and Windows that didn't have all the bloat, but still had a full professional/consumer feature-level. Kinda like Windows 2000.
 

Colif

Win 11 Master
Moderator
Its a lot to do with what win 10 was designed to do... get all the old PC on everything below it onto it.

They achieved most of that, just hard liners stuck on win 7

Win 11 doesn't need to do that again, so its requirements stop a lot of those PC from upgrading. It may never supersede win 10 as its not trying to.

I use it, I don't see that much difference between it and 10 so changing was really easy.
 

stonecarver

Reputable
When 10 was released, it was a great relief for many to get off the 8/8.1 problem.
What 8 you speak of :homer: Man I hated that ver of windows. I had a 75 % rate of people who had 8 ask me to put Windows 7 on there new 8 machines. Most I could but some just no go.

Windows 11 was almost instant due to the HDR not kicking monitor to black screen over and over. I can't take credit for figuring this out it was my son and a chain of events. But non the less windows 11 solved the issue.

We still have windows 10 here or there but all our daily driver main PC's are Windows 11 even my old but still loved 1366 systems.
 

JamesJones44

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Jan 22, 2021
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I would happily jump to 11 if they would address some of the issues around Hyper-V, but 2 years later there are still tons of open issues on the performance of Hyper-V with Windows 11 that don't exist in Windows 10.
 
I thought Windows 10 was said to be the last new Windows ever. Guess you can't trust someone's word on that.
way back around the time win 8 was launched microsoft was talking in public about walling off the x86/64 garden into the microsoft store like apple does with the itunes store.

That was the whole point of the dual kernel operating system win8 launched with, with one OS (metro) running the "microsoft store" apps and the other running a windows 8 looking version of win7 for the non-microsoft app store apps.

Well the adoption of win 8 was so awful and the general reception so bad microsoft had to backtrack. they stopped talking about walled gardens and rushed win10 out the door as essentially a softer touch move over to the "microsoft compatible" kernel. they replaced core features in win 10 with the win 8 kernel over it's life until they hit a bottleneck.

They needed a whole new OS to finish the migration. enter win 11, which is running completely on the win8 kernel and "simulates" the x86/64 windows 7 kernel everything used to run on (hence the increased system requirements). It looks like win10, but it's not win10 under the hood.

anyway this is all still their slow dealing slowly moving the x86/64 crowd over to the idea of a microsoft store. they've done some tests on the concept with windows S. windows S was a version of the OS they gave away for free to pc manufacturers for thier low end products. this helped them keep the product cost down, but one of the "features" of windows S was it prevented installation of anything outside of the microsoft store. Microsoft provided free upgrades from windows S to windows home, but the user had to perform the upgrade through the microsoft store.

What microsoft was testing was how many people upgraded from S to Home, and using that to feel out the waters for how ready the public was for walling off the x86/64 garden. obviously not ready yet. but it's coming. mark my words. sometime in the next decade the home version of windows will be the one you can only install the microsoft store apps on it. Forcing people into paying for the upgrade to pro. and they'll judge just how many people do that and decide if its time to wall off pro as well (i don't expect them to wall off pro easily, as windows pro is the core of their hegemony in the OS space)
 

Dr3ams

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When it first came out I took it for a spin and after a couple of hours, I rolled my system back to 10. My two major complaints were: couldn't create folders in the start menu and the lack of Task Manager access when right clicking on the task bar. Since then Microsoft has added those two features to Windows 11, so I reinstalled it.

The start menu in the middle of the screen is great for those with ultra wide displays. As for other features, such as: Windows Explorer, Notepad, Paint and Media Player, I've always used third party software instead.
 

alan.campbell99

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Sep 11, 2017
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I really haven't seen the need to change from 10 to 11, even if I wasn't mostly using my MBP these days. I went, from memory, 95-98-ME-7-10. Skipped 8 because I personally disliked the interface, seemed too tablet-focused to me when I was using desktops.
 
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i tried 11 for about a week and couldn't stand it.
too much like they're trying to simulate an Android or Apple phone type of OS.
switched right back to 10 with much relief.

the Taskbar Widgets was the worst thing even considering how annoying the rest of the interface may be.
constant news-feed crap about nonsense that would never interest me that just could not be disabled.
i couldn't believe how many useless processes related to Edge and other junk were always running using up resources.

i'd still rather have a new version more like 7 or XP, but 10 is doing fine for now.
 
Oct 4, 2023
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None of my hardware is allowed to run Windows 11. I could bypass the restrictions, but Microsoft warns that they have the right to cut off updates to 'obsolete' hardware at any time. I purchased a very capable desktop with the intent of running it until it slows down, and it's nowhere near slow. I'm not going to purchase a new desktop just to run an updated OS. I finally got to try Windows 11 out yesterday on someone else's laptop. I have to admit it looks shiny, but beyond the veneer, it's still Windows 10 under the hood.