Question Windows 10 won't boot with more than 1 core enabled.

Juanbenzo

Commendable
Dec 29, 2016
42
0
1,530
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Hi everyone.

First of all, here are my specs:

CPU: I7 4790k
GPU: Asus Gtx 1080 Strix
PSU: EVGA 750W Bronze
MOBO: Asus Z97-A
RAM: Kingston HyperX 1866mhz.

Please refer to this previous thread ( https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/could-a-faulty-cpu-be-causing-this.3515004/ ) where I explain in detail what happened previous to me posting this one.

Thanks to your help I was able to narrow it down to it being a CPU issue. This led me to try meddling with every CPU-related thing in the BIOS, and so I found that the pc works perfectly but only with 1 core enabled; if I enable 2, 3, or all 4, it just crashes like always. Activating or deactivating hyperthreading did not seem to make a difference.

Once I got to Windows and could finally test some things, all though very slowly, I downloaded the Intel Diagnostics Tool, ran the tests and the CPU passed them all.

So, faced with this, I would like to know if there is any specific software that I could use to further diagnose or even solve the problem.

Thank You.
 

4745454b

Titan
Moderator
You have very old parts. My thoughts are either the cpu, board, our psu is on its way out. By dropping the core to one you lower to power demands so it can work? Replace each part of at a time until it works.
 

Juanbenzo

Commendable
Dec 29, 2016
42
0
1,530
0
You have very old parts. My thoughts are either the cpu, board, our psu is on its way out. By dropping the core to one you lower to power demands so it can work? Replace each part of at a time until it works.
Thank you.

I have already tried that and posted about the results in my old post; changing the PSU doesn't change anything. In fact, I've tried it with a perfectly working 1000w PSU and still.
 

geofelt

Titan
I took the MOBO to tech support and they said they tested it with other CPUs and it worked fine; that's how I eventually found that the problem was the CPU.
Now take one of the other working processors and test it in your motherboard.
If you still get a failure, then, yes, you likely have a bad cpu.
It is most unusual for an intel processor to go bad, but it must happen on occasion.
 

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