News Windows 11's Blue Screen of Death Could Be Turning Black

Apr 1, 2020
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Typical Microsoft, instead of making a useful change, like generating an error summary and detail log along with a direct link to the error glossary webpage, which are placed on the desktop for easy viewing on the next boot, they make an insignificant change of changing the error screen color...
 

Shadowclash10

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May 3, 2020
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At least at one point, users of Windows 10 Insider Builds got green screens of death,
My main PC is on the Beta Channel of the Insider program, and I get green BSODs, so I suppose that's still ongoing.
 

Giroro

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Jan 22, 2015
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Well Microsoft gave it there best and their best wasn't good enough.... or even adequate
....or even an attempt at something new.

I've already decided there's no chance I downgrade to Windows 11's slower GUI (as in it takes more clicks to see less information).
So I'm totally ambivalent on the OS starting after this post ... until they either figure out how to make a settings menu that is more functional than the control panel, or they invent a file system that is better at taking advantage of a fast SSD.
At a minimum, they should get around to fixing some of the "behind the scenes" problems that have been persisting for over a decade.
Maybe they could do more to stop their hardware partners from flooding out the market with barely-functional garbage.
Fix the problems, do a clean sheet rewrite, add some actual OS-level features instead of just screwing around with mandatory pre-installed apps. Do any amount of work to improve the actual "thing that makes your computer go". The GUI was fine (not great, but at least usable). That's the last thing they should have tried changing.

A new GUI isn't good enough.
Trying to force different/more of their wildly unpopular apps is not good enough.
"It can still run Microsoft teams" and "you can install an emulator" are not selling points for an operating system.
What real changes are they making to justify a new version number, or that people should even try out the worse UI/UX?

I don't need another inferior reskin of Windows NT 6.1.

And I'm no "change is bad" purist here either. I actually liked Vista a lot. It was the first home version of Windows that could easily connect to networks and maintain a consistent connection. But, the changes need to have a point. What is the point of Windows 11?
Why should anybody bother paying enough attention to even find out when it will release?
 

excalibur1814

Distinguished
Sep 12, 2009
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Well Microsoft gave it there best and their best wasn't good enough.... or even adequate
....or even an attempt at something new.

I've already decided there's no chance I downgrade to Windows 11's slower GUI (as in it takes more clicks to see less information).

Damned if they do, damned if they don't. Yes, sure, for an Admin a couple of things do take longer. Right clicking the Start button is at least a rescue to get to the Task Manager etc.

Either way, it's the future, so we're in it for the long game. Embrace the changes. People said the same things about Windows 10, that you're saying about 11.
 

randomizer

Champion
Moderator
Typical Microsoft, instead of making a useful change, like generating an error summary and detail log along with a direct link to the error glossary webpage, which are placed on the desktop for easy viewing on the next boot, they make an insignificant change of changing the error screen color...
To be fair, for the majority of users this wouldn't be any more helpful than burying it in the event log, as documentation about BSOD error codes is completely unintelligible for a non-technical user.
 

waltc3

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Aug 4, 2019
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Haven't had either a GSOD or a BSOD in many moons. Also, in some W11 screens Microsoft is opting for large white fonts on a jet black background--which looks much better than the usual pale white on blueish backgrounds, imo. Cause of most Win10/11 crash screens seems to be pushing the ram clocks and timings--at least, that has been true for me. All-core CPU overclocking is the next greatest cause of instability for me. Total stability is a wonderful thing...;)
 

Shadowclash10

Prominent
May 3, 2020
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Well Microsoft gave it there best and their best wasn't good enough.... or even adequate
....or even an attempt at something new.

I've already decided there's no chance I downgrade to Windows 11's slower GUI (as in it takes more clicks to see less information).
So I'm totally ambivalent on the OS starting after this post ... until they either figure out how to make a settings menu that is more functional than the control panel, or they invent a file system that is better at taking advantage of a fast SSD.
At a minimum, they should get around to fixing some of the "behind the scenes" problems that have been persisting for over a decade.
Maybe they could do more to stop their hardware partners from flooding out the market with barely-functional garbage.
Fix the problems, do a clean sheet rewrite, add some actual OS-level features instead of just screwing around with mandatory pre-installed apps. Do any amount of work to improve the actual "thing that makes your computer go". The GUI was fine (not great, but at least usable). That's the last thing they should have tried changing.

A new GUI isn't good enough.
Trying to force different/more of their wildly unpopular apps is not good enough.
"It can still run Microsoft teams" and "you can install an emulator" are not selling points for an operating system.
What real changes are they making to justify a new version number, or that people should even try out the worse UI/UX?

I don't need another inferior reskin of Windows NT 6.1.

And I'm no "change is bad" purist here either. I actually liked Vista a lot. It was the first home version of Windows that could easily connect to networks and maintain a consistent connection. But, the changes need to have a point. What is the point of Windows 11?
Why should anybody bother paying enough attention to even find out when it will release?

This is why it's more akin to 21H2 rather than a totally new OS.
 

Shadowclash10

Prominent
May 3, 2020
183
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To be fair, for the majority of users this wouldn't be any more helpful than burying it in the event log, as documentation about BSOD error codes is completely unintelligible for a non-technical user.
Agreed. I would argue that the Windows 8/10/11 BSOD is actually better overall for the majority of users, because it tells the user basically all they need to know - their PC has run into a problem, so it needs to restart.
 

mikeebb

Distinguished
Nov 2, 2014
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Making it black is a great move for readability (as long as they keep the text white, and don't yield to the modern temptation of using a medium grey). EDIT: perhaps not so great if it can be confused (briefly, admittedly) with normal black shutdown screens.

Appreciate the instructions for registry hacking if we want to experience it now.

Another approach was described by Russinovich in 2019 at https://techcommunity.microsoft.com/t5/windows-blog-archive/8220-blue-screens-8221-in-designer-colors-with-one-click/ba-p/723977
 
Typical Microsoft, instead of making a useful change, like generating an error summary and detail log along with a direct link to the error glossary webpage, which are placed on the desktop for easy viewing on the next boot, they make an insignificant change of changing the error screen color...
Stop Errors do provide a summary/log in the Event Viewer and I believe by default it generates a dump of RAM so you can use a tool like WhoCrashed to figure out what caused it. In addition, the Stop Error screen provides a QR code and a text link to Microsoft's website and the error to look for. The thing is, Stop Errors should be an extremely rare occurrence and involves troubleshooting that may be more advanced than what Grandma Betty knows about computers. Adding some unknown looking thing on a desktop may further fuel uneasiness in what a non computer-savvy user is already experiencing.

Basically, everything you need to get started with troubleshooting is already there.

The other thing is a Stop Error means, as far as the OS knows, something has gone horribly wrong that the computer can't recover from it. So whatever mechanisms its doing is limited to being as simplistic as possible. The last thing you want is your last resort error handling routine to fail because it's trying to work on something that caused the error to happen in the first place.
 

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