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I have a old 2009 HP Pavilion DV4 laptop that was being just only to play mp3’s for a couple years on Windows 10 when it started restarting for no reason. Without looking up a solution first, I decided to reinstall the OS when the suggested Windows fixes didn’t work. Using a bootable USB, I kept having issues with the Windows 10 install restarting and couldn’t finish the install. Afterwards, I deleted all the partitions and tried again a few times with no better luck.

Since it was originally a Windows 7 computer I figured it W7 would work. Since the hard drive partitions were all removed from the previously failed Windows 10 install I deleted everything and started again. Using two different Windows 7 bootable USBs, I’m still having issues with the install where it restarts before it can finish. Sometimes it will get past the Expanding Windows Files and restart as soon as it reaches Installing features. Sometimes it will restart at Expanding Windows Files.

Any help or suggestions?
 
Sep 3, 2021
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So it was a stick of ram that was faulty. Since I wasn't able to load the Memtest program I tried the Windows install by removing a stick of memory (since I had 2) to see if it went through and everything installed on the first try! I never expected the ram to go bad since its been working the last 12 years.

I downloaded the Memtest86, the older version since I dont have UEFI, but couldn't get it to load with a bootable USB option and my BIOS didnt have anything to check the voltage readings.

Thank you all for your replies.

I'd suggest failure on either motherboard, RAM or PSU.

To check RAM
Can use Memtest86+. It ships with most Linux iso images (there is a menu at boot to select "check RAM" or similar) and you don't need to load any OS. Let Memtest run for some hours, overnight if possible.

To check PSU
Normally, I'd suggest a software but since you can't load Windows we skip this step (cannot do).
Instead - go into bios menu, and look after live voltage readings. Check if the voltages are within acceptable range (you simply post the result here).

Be aware the PSU may still be faulty because such readings won't pick up sudden voltage spikes or high ripple voltages that can cause unstability for the system.

To check motherboard
If all the other components checks out being in good condition, the motherboard is the only thing left. Unfortunately there isn't a good way of checking the health status of a motherboard just like that.
 

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Bad hard drive? Failing PSU? A computer that old it could be a lot of things, but if it's rebooting during the Windows 10 install, it's definitely hardware.
 
I'd suggest failure on either motherboard, RAM or PSU.

To check RAM
Can use Memtest86+. It ships with most Linux iso images (there is a menu at boot to select "check RAM" or similar) and you don't need to load any OS. Let Memtest run for some hours, overnight if possible.

To check PSU
Normally, I'd suggest a software but since you can't load Windows we skip this step (cannot do).
Instead - go into bios menu, and look after live voltage readings. Check if the voltages are within acceptable range (you simply post the result here).

Be aware the PSU may still be faulty because such readings won't pick up sudden voltage spikes or high ripple voltages that can cause unstability for the system.

To check motherboard
If all the other components checks out being in good condition, the motherboard is the only thing left. Unfortunately there isn't a good way of checking the health status of a motherboard just like that.
 
Sep 3, 2021
2
0
10
1
So it was a stick of ram that was faulty. Since I wasn't able to load the Memtest program I tried the Windows install by removing a stick of memory (since I had 2) to see if it went through and everything installed on the first try! I never expected the ram to go bad since its been working the last 12 years.

I downloaded the Memtest86, the older version since I dont have UEFI, but couldn't get it to load with a bootable USB option and my BIOS didnt have anything to check the voltage readings.

Thank you all for your replies.

I'd suggest failure on either motherboard, RAM or PSU.

To check RAM
Can use Memtest86+. It ships with most Linux iso images (there is a menu at boot to select "check RAM" or similar) and you don't need to load any OS. Let Memtest run for some hours, overnight if possible.

To check PSU
Normally, I'd suggest a software but since you can't load Windows we skip this step (cannot do).
Instead - go into bios menu, and look after live voltage readings. Check if the voltages are within acceptable range (you simply post the result here).

Be aware the PSU may still be faulty because such readings won't pick up sudden voltage spikes or high ripple voltages that can cause unstability for the system.

To check motherboard
If all the other components checks out being in good condition, the motherboard is the only thing left. Unfortunately there isn't a good way of checking the health status of a motherboard just like that.
 
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