Question Windows constantly blue screens. I've tried multiple things to no avail.

sycomania134

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Feb 19, 2014
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So after 1 month of working perfectly fine, out of nowhere my PC has begun to aggresively blue screen like 2 minutes after I turn it on. Everytime there is a different error message, and I can't even keep the thing on long enough to try and troubleshoot it. At first I thought I was the RAM. All the error messages were pointing towards the RAM. So I went out and bought some new sticks, and lo and behold, it's still blue screening. I've tried resetting the CMOS battery, and when I tried to reinstall windows, it blue screened during the setup. Finally, I decided to go out and buy a new motherboard. Again, blue screened while installing windows. This is ridiculous, and I have no idea what the issue could possibly be. Even the repair shop dude told me it's the RAM. The only other thing I could think of is that my Graphics card is defective but I honestly have no idea at this point. Any help would be greatly appreciated. I can post dump files if anyone wants.

Specs are as follows:
RTX 2070 STRIX
RYZEN 5 2600X
16GB 3200MHZ HYPERX FURY (TRIED REPLACING WITH 16GB 3000MHZ CORSAIR VENGEANCE LPX)
AORUS B450 PRO MOTHERBOARD (TRIED REPLACING WITH MSI PRO SERIES B450-A PRO)
GIGABYTE P650B POWER SUPPLY
500GB WD NVME
 

jimmysmitty

Polypheme
Moderator
Could be your SSD. A failing drive, HDD or SSD, could also cause random BSoD and act much like memory. The only real way to test memory is to use a program like Memtest 86+ and run it for a good 8+ hours.

The other possible issue could be PSU:

http://www.jonnyguru.com/forums/showthread.php?14993-Gigabyte-P650B-Review-gecid

The one you have didn't really review well. If the PSU is failing and not providing proper power it could also lead to random BSoD.

Personally I would do this:

  1. Run a memory tester for 8+ hours
  2. If that passes try a new PSU
  3. If that doesn't do it try another SSD
 

sycomania134

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Feb 19, 2014
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Could be your SSD. A failing drive, HDD or SSD, could also cause random BSoD and act much like memory. The only real way to test memory is to use a program like Memtest 86+ and run it for a good 8+ hours.

The other possible issue could be PSU:

http://www.jonnyguru.com/forums/showthread.php?14993-Gigabyte-P650B-Review-gecid

The one you have didn't really review well. If the PSU is failing and not providing proper power it could also lead to random Bsod. The repair place I took it to claims that they ran memtest and results came back normal.

Personally I would do this:

  1. Run a memory tester for 8+ hours
  2. If that passes try a new PSU
  3. If that doesn't do it try another SSD
Hey, thanks for the reply. I was actually suspecting the GPU the most. Unfortunately I don't have a spare rig or a test bench to run the memtest. However the repair place I took it to claims to have ran memory tests which came back normal. I've already swapped RAM sticks with brand new ones though so I don't think it's the RAM unless the new RAM I bought is also defective. I will go out tomorrow and try to buy a new PSU. Any reason you say to test PSU first?
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
There's been a rash of bsod reported due to the 1903 Windows update in May, which are supposed to have been fixed by the latest Oct. 8 KB4517389 cumulative update, but for some ppl, the combination has either worked right and fixed the issues, done really nothing or made things worse and started bsod. What's really bad is that the bsod can happen at anytime from boot to windows load or after windows starts.

Roll back Windows Update
 

jimmysmitty

Polypheme
Moderator
Hey, thanks for the reply. I was actually suspecting the GPU the most. Unfortunately I don't have a spare rig or a test bench to run the memtest. However the repair place I took it to claims to have ran memory tests which came back normal. I've already swapped RAM sticks with brand new ones though so I don't think it's the RAM unless the new RAM I bought is also defective. I will go out tomorrow and try to buy a new PSU. Any reason you say to test PSU first?
That PSU didn't have a strong review. A failing PSU not providing proper power could cause BSoD.

Don't forget it could also be your SSD.

I am not saying what it is for sure. You could be correct that its the GPU although most GPUs that are having issues unless really bad wont crash unless stressed. I had a GPU that had one failing fan and would crash gaming but would pass some stress tests.
 

sycomania134

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Feb 19, 2014
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That PSU didn't have a strong review. A failing PSU not providing proper power could cause BSoD.

Don't forget it could also be your SSD.

I am not saying what it is for sure. You could be correct that its the GPU although most GPUs that are having issues unless really bad wont crash unless stressed. I had a GPU that had one failing fan and would crash gaming but would pass some stress tests.
The thing about the ssd is that it crashed while trying to install windows of a usb...
 

sycomania134

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Feb 19, 2014
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BSOD often are software related. Boot up in safe mode and see if the problem persists.
Hi, thanks for the reply. I'm currently trying to get windows installed (and failing because it keeps BOSDing on me) but the repair guy claims that he was able to boot into safe mode. I've replaced the motherboard, tried swapping out the RAM, and formatted the HDD so really can't see how it could be software at this point.
 

Flayed

Proper
Oct 8, 2019
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Hi, thanks for the reply. I'm currently trying to get windows installed (and failing because it keeps BOSDing on me) but the repair guy claims that he was able to boot into safe mode. I've replaced the motherboard, tried swapping out the RAM, and formatted the HDD so really can't see how it could be software at this point.
Yes that would point to hardware failure. I guess you will have to swap the PSU then CPU. I would have swapped the PSU first as they tend to fail more often.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
If it'll boot to safe mode, it's extremely unlikely to be hardware, be it ssd or psu or mobo. More likely it's driver related, as that can be an issue during full boot, yet not in safe mode, as safe mode doesn't load any drivers except what's necessary for the system.

You could try booting to command prompt and typing SFC /SCANNOW to see if it's corrupted system file.
 

sycomania134

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Feb 19, 2014
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If it'll boot to safe mode, it's extremely unlikely to be hardware, be it ssd or psu or mobo. More likely it's driver related, as that can be an issue during full boot, yet not in safe mode, as safe mode doesn't load any drivers except what's necessary for the system.

You could try booting to command prompt and typing SFC /SCANNOW to see if it's corrupted system file.
Hi, thanks for the reply. Everything pointed to driver or memory issues, but I swapping out the memory with a brand new kit didn't fix it. As for drivers, I got a new motherboard, and formatted the SSD. I can't do any troubleshooting on the PC because I can't actually get the OS to install without a bluescreen.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Did the motherboard come with media? A USB or cd?

You did format ntfs and not fat32?

Have you tried power down, unplug data cable (or remove m.2 from slot) from mobo, power up, insert USB (leave it plugged in), power down, reconnect ssd, power up?
 

sycomania134

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Did the motherboard come with media? A USB or cd?

You did format ntfs and not fat32?

Have you tried power down, unplug data cable (or remove m.2 from slot) from mobo, power up, insert USB (leave it plugged in), power down, reconnect ssd, power up?
The motherboard came with a CD but I can't use it seeing as I don't have an optical drive.

I don't understand your second question but I did not try your third step. The issue has been persisting since before I tried to reinstall windows so I don't see how removing the m.2 would make a difference.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
There's multiple types of file systems, windows 10 uses NTFS. The usb will use Fat32, since it's smaller than 32Gb. A file sysyem being How the drive is organized. Years ago, windows was fat32, windows XP first used NTFS in normal home use. But when you format a drive, it should ask which file system you want, and to install windows it should have NTFS, if the format was fat32 instead, you can get issues. Trying to put a square peg in a round hole.

Powering up with the usb in, and not the drive starts the install process, then gets put on hold while you power down and install a functional drive. I'm not sure I can explain well enough other than it's basically sets dominance of the usb over the drive, whereas having the drive in first sets the drive as dominant and the USB as secondary, even if it's booting first. Like master/slave on the old ide drives.

As to persistent bsods, there's an assumption that they are all from the same source as prior. I can't see ram or memory issues from a faulty gpu. That could be caused by a faulty psu, but not a faulty ssd. Not now that you say you formatted the ssd, which removes any software issue, but that could be an issue with new install of windows, but wouldn't give a ram error. New mobo and new ram, so doubtful the fault lies with either of those, which goes back to psu being the only piece of hardware that can affect everything and any anything at any time, but even then, usb/ssd runs on 5v rail, the rest of the pc runs on 12v rail except the logic circuitry which runs 3.3v rail, so youd need to have a problem with all 3 rails for it to affect gpu/ram, mobo and ssd.

Which makes me wonder if the bsod you currently get are not related to the bsod you originally got, but a series of bsod for an entirely different reason. Which would explain why you can't nail down a single culprit.
 
Hi, thanks for the reply. I'm currently trying to get windows installed (and failing because it keeps BOSDing on me) but the repair guy claims that he was able to boot into safe mode. I've replaced the motherboard, tried swapping out the RAM, and formatted the HDD so really can't see how it could be software at this point.
Some thoughts here:

There aren't many things that can cause Windows to BSOD during install, since most services are naturally not running and the GPU is running without a driver using native output. This more or less confirms hardware, so the problem comes to narrowing down a specific component.

SSD failure is possible, and easy to confirm. Just check the drives SMART status; there's plenty of apps that can do so. I don't think this is it though, based on your description.

RAM is likely, except you already swapped it. It's possible a RAM slot itself has failed however, and that would explain things. In the short term, try running with just one stick in one slot. If the problem persists, run with a different stick in a different slot. Just to rule out RAM.

GPU is possible but unlikely if BSODs occur during Windows install. I'd also expect BSODs to correspond with high GPU usage, and that doesn't sound like the case here.

PSU/Motherboard are hard to test without swapping them, but are likely the culprits if not any of the above.
 

sycomania134

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Feb 19, 2014
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Some thoughts here:

There aren't many things that can cause Windows to BSOD during install, since most services are naturally not running and the GPU is running without a driver using native output. This more or less confirms hardware, so the problem comes to narrowing down a specific component.

SSD failure is possible, and easy to confirm. Just check the drives SMART status; there's plenty of apps that can do so. I don't think this is it though, based on your description.

RAM is likely, except you already swapped it. It's possible a RAM slot itself has failed however, and that would explain things. In the short term, try running with just one stick in one slot. If the problem persists, run with a different stick in a different slot. Just to rule out RAM.

GPU is possible but unlikely if BSODs occur during Windows install. I'd also expect BSODs to correspond with high GPU usage, and that doesn't sound like the case here.

PSU/Motherboard are hard to test without swapping them, but are likely the culprits if not any of the above.
Hey thanks for the reply. I've already tested motherboard by swapping it out with a brand new one, and the problem still persisted. I guess it's most likely the PSU or SSD at this point?
 

Giannis_Mag

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May 24, 2017
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I'm pretty sure that if it was a PSU problem it would definitely go down randomly , without viewing the blue screen. Wattage and Voltage failing results to dead or low electricity and restarts or shuts down the pc without alert. If its a PSU overvoltage problem.....then I dont know. Recommend you to change the ssd or even the cpu.
 

jimmysmitty

Polypheme
Moderator
I'm pretty sure that if it was a PSU problem it would definitely go down randomly , without viewing the blue screen. Wattage and Voltage failing results to dead or low electricity and restarts or shuts down the pc without alert. If its a PSU overvoltage problem.....then I dont know. Recommend you to change the ssd or even the cpu.
Yes and no. I have seen cases where the PSU provides enough power but not enough for proper function and will cause a BSoD.

Thats also why I said it could be a possibility but also could be a faulty drive or other component, minus the ones he already tried changing.

i bet it's cpu as well.
Possibly but I doubt it. The odds of a faulty CPU are 1 in well a very big number. In my years of repairing CPUs I have only seen about 3 actual faulty CPUs. I even dropped one once on concrete and it still worked fine, it was just a test CPU so it was no big deal anyways.
 
lol, i've seen 3-4 cpus die here at work, one while i was using the pc, but it just died suddenly. Since the OP swapped the mobo and ram, it's less likely those are the culprits, but he should still test the ram with memtest86
 

jimmysmitty

Polypheme
Moderator
So we have taken out Motherboard, RAM and SSD. That leaves us with PSU, GPU and CPU. If it were me I would rank them like this:

  1. PSU
  2. GPU
  3. CPU
Thats in order from most likely to least likely in my mind.

On a side note I did have a random thought. Have you tried setting this up outside of your case on a test bed? It may be possible a faulty USB port on the case is causing the issues. Just another idea.
 

sycomania134

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Feb 19, 2014
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So we have taken out Motherboard, RAM and SSD. That leaves us with PSU, GPU and CPU. If it were me I would rank them like this:

  1. PSU
  2. GPU
  3. CPU
Thats in order from most likely to least likely in my mind.

On a side note I did have a random thought. Have you tried setting this up outside of your case on a test bed? It may be possible a faulty USB port on the case is causing the issues. Just another idea.
It's probably not the the USB port seeing as it was crashing even before I wiped Windows and on 2 different motherboards. I'm gonna test the PSU now but my friend brought up that it could be a faulty memory controller on the CPU, which I guess makes sense seeing as most of my dump errors are memory related.
 

jimmysmitty

Polypheme
Moderator
It's probably not the the USB port seeing as it was crashing even before I wiped Windows and on 2 different motherboards. I'm gonna test the PSU now but my friend brought up that it could be a faulty memory controller on the CPU, which I guess makes sense seeing as most of my dump errors are memory related.
As I said its plausable but I wouldn't put it as the number 1. CPUs are very rarely faulty and hard to kill, lots of protections and tons of Q/A go into them.
 

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