Question Windows damaged my laptop

Oct 23, 2020
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List of issues:
* Can't boot into any OS normally, have to use a live Linux USB, go into the grub commandline, and type in a bunch of commands just to get into my Ubuntu install

* It takes anywhere between 3 to 5 and a half minutes from power-on to getting into the bios

* SSD (the drive with Windows on it) is completely inaccessible, it shows the directories inside it on the grub command line and shows the partitions when I type lsblk in terminal but otherwise it doesn't even show up in my file manager, fdisk, or gparted.

* Even booting into a Live USB takes a couple minutes, these boot times are extremely abnormal as my laptop has pretty great hardware.

* If I just let the computer boot without opening the BIOS, it shows a black screen with white text in the middle that says
"Reboot and select proper Boot Device or Insert Boot Media in selected Boot device".

What happened:
I tried to see if Windows would handle video game streaming a bit better than Linux because my game was being a little too slow to play while streaming. I updated OBS (I don't normally use Windows), loaded it up, set up the stream in-browser via youtube, and clicked start stream. I moved around in the game a bit, noticed a lot of stuttering and some freezing, was about to stop the test stream when the entire OS froze for a good 10 minutes before giving me the blue screen of death with the stupid frowning emoticon, saying it was 100% done sending the crash report to Microsoft for over an hour before I decided to turn it off.

TL;DR: I tried to stream for 5 seconds on Windows and it practically bricked my computer and possibly corrupted or destroyed my SSD and now I can only post this by using a live USB I had laying around and <Mod Edit> grub to boot into my linux hard drive.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

hang-the-9

Titan
Moderator
Windows (or any OS) does not destroy hardware, but stressing hardware that is close to failure may cause issues. Could be your run of the programs in Windows generated enough heat to finish damaging whatever was on the edge. You are applying causality in the wrong way, it's similar to say your friend being in the car with you and your engine blows up, do you blame your friend for the engine issue because it worked fine before he got in the car? Did you swap the SSD to see if it fixed your issues?
 
Oct 23, 2020
4
0
10
0
Windows (or any OS) does not destroy hardware, but stressing hardware that is close to failure may cause issues. Could be your run of the programs in Windows generated enough heat to finish damaging whatever was on the edge. You are applying causality in the wrong way, it's similar to say your friend being in the car with you and your engine blows up, do you blame your friend for the engine issue because it worked fine before he got in the car? Did you swap the SSD to see if it fixed your issues?
No, I can't afford to go and buy a brand new SSD, and regardless the data inside my current one is too important to just forget about, also I don't think this is simply an SSD issue because it wasn't having a single issue before, it wasn't slowing down or showing any signs of failure, and otherwise I would still be able to boot into Linux normally, but I can't. It takes me 10 minutes to get into my Ubuntu installation because I have to type 6 lines into grub which I have to load up in a USB and about half those commands take a while to load. That's why I made this thread and want to find out a way to at least recover the data and fix the boot issue, not talk about how I "blew up the engine" for doing something my hardware handled just fine on Linux even though I was using the same exact software on Windows.
 

hang-the-9

Titan
Moderator
No, I can't afford to go and buy a brand new SSD, and regardless the data inside my current one is too important to just forget about, also I don't think this is simply an SSD issue because it wasn't having a single issue before, it wasn't slowing down or showing any signs of failure, and otherwise I would still be able to boot into Linux normally, but I can't. It takes me 10 minutes to get into my Ubuntu installation because I have to type 6 lines into grub which I have to load up in a USB and about half those commands take a while to load. That's why I made this thread and want to find out a way to at least recover the data and fix the boot issue, not talk about how I "blew up the engine" for doing something my hardware handled just fine on Linux even though I was using the same exact software on Windows.
Connect your disk to another system and see if you can read the data using that or using the USB Linux boot. Data recovery of an SSD is not easy, that is why backups are done. A platter drive is easier in this way, but due to how an SSD works it fails in different ways. You did not say anything about a data recovery from the disk in your post, so the simple fix for an SSD that does not is to replace it. If the disk is bad without replacing it you won't get a usable system. You may just have a corrupted file system but the fact the system is acting poorly with the disk connected points more to a disk issue than a file system issue.
 
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