Windows Experience Index score of 5.9

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William A

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Apr 20, 2014
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What can I do to improve my disk data transfer rate on my primary hard drive? I am running windows 7 and recently replaced my hard drive and my Windows Experience Index score is now only 5.9 which is the score for the hdd. Everything else has a fairly high score: processor 7.5, ram 7.5, graphics 7.4, and gaming graphics 7.4. Should I have got a different hdd? Any help would be welcome. Thanks
 

BennyJi

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Hi there,

The Windows Experience Index Score is a very innacurate measure of PC performance and shouldn't have too much stock put in it so don't worry too much about it.

However if you're intent on getting a higher score you should look into getting a SSD for your main Hard drive. That is what gave me a 7.9 on the scoring setup whereas every other HDD I had used was the stock standard 5.9 score.

Just to reiterate though, it is not worth purchasing newer components in order to raise the windows score only. It is not an accurate representation of performance.

Regards
 

Melissa2008B

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I have the same situation and am wondering if switching to SSD might radically improve my speed.

We don't do gaming, but we do watch videos online. On my PC, it's not too bad, but I cant help wondering if Windows 7 is capable of using the quad cores to their capability, of if they're not being used at all, and if my 8 GB RAM is being used to the best of its abilities.

 

BennyJi

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Hi,

A SSD is not a cure all. It will allow for data to be accessed quicker off that, but if the problem lies elsewhere you will not see any drastic improvement.

Increasing speed is a very vague request so if you could clarify that a little better we could make some headway.

Regards
 


The above poster is correct. Also, you reference a quad core and 8GB RAM which should be more than enough for the use you described (online video). Where exactly are you seeing slowness? If only things that are done online are slow, you might have trouble with your internet connection. Try resetting the internet router (unplug it and turn it back on after a minute).

On the other hand if things other than internet-related actions are slow there may be an issue somewhere in the PC. The common causes would be what I said above for the internet or malware or issues in the operating system. To help diagnose the latter, first tell us what loads on startup. If you have a bunch of things that start with Windows, that extra software could be partly to blame. To find other problems, do a clean boot then press CTRL-ALT-DEL and bring up the task manager. Observe the CPU activity in the "performance" tab for a few minutes. After a clean boot on an idle desktop the CPU activity should be near zero. If there's substantial CPU activity over a few minutes that indicates a background process (likely malware of some sort) is slowing the PC.

Instructions for a clean boot: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/929135

 
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