Question Windows repair and data recovery

Feb 18, 2022
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Not sure if Im in the right thread, if not please direct me. Thank you
I work at a pc parts store and we were just given permission to now repair PC's as well. I am doing my research but I would like some advice on software that would recover and fix data as well as other cloning from HDD to SSD (since in newer PC's legacy is not an option anymore and makes it difficult for the PC to accept a different storage). The top one that I have seen so far for this is EaseUs. Just need some help picking the right one for the money and on whether someone has advice on EaseUs or others. Thank you again in advance
 

Lafong

Respectable
I used Easeus briefly 10 or 12 years ago and thought it was ordinary. It was a very large installation as I recall.

System backup: Macrium Reflect and Aomei Backupper

Personal file backup; SyncBackFree, Free File Sync, many others.

Data and partition recovery: Photorec; Test Disk, Recuva, Getdataback (not free); Active @ File Recovery (not free); Ontrack EasyRecovery Professional (not free); Minitool Partition Wizard.

They have various functions and associated learning curves.
 

howtobeironic

Reputable
Jun 16, 2018
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Over the top of everything said here, I was a regular user of PhotoRec, but the recent issue I had was solved off with DMDE instead, which just opened my eyes to that magnificent piece of data recovery software. It's a sophisticated (and kind of hard to navigate through) thing that has full carving abilities of PhotoRec, and on top of that, it can build out virtual filesystems and RAID configurations looking at what's in the drive, which is WAY better than to sort through 30000 unnamed PDF files any other carver puts in front of you. Top that up with a few tools like a builtin hex editor and SMART readings, and it's a full data recovery set in one piece. Free for personal use (4000 files recovered per operation but you can recover unlimited batches of 4000), pretty affordable one-off prices for commercial.

I'd also keep a Linux-installed pendrive somewhere with dd-rescue installed in it (or buy the Windows GUI version, if you don't want to), it's always safer to operate on a bitstream copy of the disk rather than the actual one.
 

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