Question Wire connecting gpu gets hot

May 3, 2019
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So I've got gtx 1070 paired with 650w psu and whenever i do benchmark or game, the wire connecting to gpu gets very hot......what might be the problem.
 

Satan-IR

Honorable
What is the PSU make and model?

How hot is it to touch? Hot is kind of relative unless you can measure it in degrees C for example.

Wires get warm/hot because of their resistance to the current going through them. If the proper wire gauge is chosen when deigning and implementing the design it's mostly OK.

If it's not the gauge necessary for tolerating the current going though (or if because of bad design or failing components an over-current goes through) and the circuit is under heavy load for long it might get too hot and then it's a fire hazard, not to mention it would ruin the PSU and potentially any components connected to it specially the graphic card.
 
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So I've got gtx 1070 paired with 650w psu and whenever i do benchmark or game, the wire connecting to gpu gets very hot......what might be the problem.
What manufacturer/model GTX1070 and PSU?
Are you using any adapters for connecting PSU to graphics card?
Does the graphics card have single 8pin PCIE connector or 6pin+8pin?
Did you OC the graphics card?
 
Reactions: Nepszy
May 3, 2019
17
0
10
0
What manufacturer/model GTX1070 and PSU?
Are you using any adapters for connecting PSU to graphics card?
Does the graphics card have single 8pin PCIE connector or 6pin+8pin?
Did you OC the graphics card?
Gpu is msi armor oc......psu is cheap 650w...
It has single 8 pin and I haven't done any overclocking......and did underclocking of power usage to min
 
May 3, 2019
17
0
10
0
What is the PSU make and model?

How hot is it to touch? Hot is kind of relative unless you can measure it in degrees C for example.

Wires get warm/hot because of their resistance to the current going through them. If the proper wire gauge is chosen when deigning and implementing the design it's mostly OK.

If it's not the gauge necessary for tolerating the current going though (or if because of bad design or failing components an over-current goes through) and the circuit is under heavy load for long it might get too hot and then it's a fire hazard, not to mention it would ruin the PSU and potentially any components connected to it specially the graphic card.
Its pretty cheap 650w psu.....the wire connecting to gpu gets extremly hot and to run my gpu without wire getting hot I have to underclock gpu power usage to min
 

Satan-IR

Honorable
Its pretty cheap 650w psu.....the wire connecting to gpu gets extremly hot and to run my gpu without wire getting hot I have to underclock gpu power usage to min

I would suggest you replace the PSU with a good quality unit as soon as possible.

What's the point of having a decent graphics card which you have to clockdown to use safely?

More importantly the sooner you get rid of a low quality device that is in fact a fire hazard the better.
 
Reactions: Nepszy
The PCI Express supplementary power cable is getting hot because the wire gauge of the cable is too light/thin to properly handle the electric current being drawn through it by the graphics card. The heating of the wire will cause a voltage drop at the graphics card's PCI Express supplementary power connector causing the graphics card to be unstable. Your underclocking reduces the current draw resulting in less voltage loss and better graphics card stability.

The solution? Use a better quality power supply unit.
 
Reactions: Nepszy
May 3, 2019
17
0
10
0
The PCI Express supplementary power cable is getting hot because the wire gauge of the cable is too light/thin to properly handle the electric current being drawn through it by the graphics card. The heating of the wire will cause a voltage drop at the graphics card's PCI Express supplementary power connector causing the graphics card to be unstable. Your underclocking reduces the current draw resulting in less voltage loss and better graphics card stability.

The solution? Use a better quality power supply unit.
Thanks for the help......but is it possible that gpu is the faulty
 
May 3, 2019
17
0
10
0
I would suggest you replace the PSU with a good quality unit as soon as possible.

What's the point of having a decent graphics card which you have to clockdown to use safely?

More importantly the sooner you get rid of a low quality device that is in fact a fire hazard the better.
Thanks for suggestion.....will 600w 80+ bronze good enough for gtx 1070 and i5 8600k
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
At 650w, most decent psus have a minimum capacity of 2x 6+2pin pcie, some have upto 2x 6+2pin and 2x 6pin pcie. The single 6+2pin on your psu shows how little faith in the ability the psu manufacturer has. If only 150w is for gpu, where else is all that wattage going. Nowhere really, as that unit will probably melt down if subjected to more than a 60% load.
 
Reactions: Nepszy
May 3, 2019
17
0
10
0
At 650w, most decent psus have a minimum capacity of 2x 6+2pin pcie, some have upto 2x 6+2pin and 2x 6pin pcie. The single 6+2pin on your psu shows how little faith in the ability the psu manufacturer has. If only 150w is for gpu, where else is all that wattage going. Nowhere really, as that unit will probably melt down if subjected to more than a 60% load.
It has only 6 pin PCIe and I'm using LP4 to 8 pin PCIe
 
It doesn't really matter what Wattage a PSU is, it's about quality.
A quality 450w PSU will be stable at 450w max - and probably can get 20% more than that (like many high quality PSUs)
When you have a cheap one, think of it like cheap speakers.
Cheap speakers say they are 500watts PMPO which is a lie anyway.
So a 650watt psu, from a cheap brand is cheap because it lies and uses cheap components to make it cheap.

Name your country and how much money you have then we can look at see what the best available PSU there is where you are.
 
Reactions: Nepszy

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