Question Wire connecting gpu gets hot

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Karadjgne

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There's only 2 connector on any psu that's capable of 150w 12vDC and that's a 6+2pin/8pin pcie and the EPS connector. Since the EPS will be in use, that leaves your 6pin pcie. A pcie can carry 5A per pin, and a 6pin has 2x 12vDC pins, the other 4 are ground/sense. A 6pin is physically capable of upto 120w. If you are using adapter to make a 6pin to 8pin, (8pin has 3x 12vDC, 180w) you are asking a normally 75w connector to max out rating at 120w, which is still less than the 150w demanded by the gpu. That's called melting wire time.

A decent 650w has 2x 6+2, and 2x 6pin pcie. You have a single 6pin. Simple fact is that a cheap POS psu that was never, ever, intended to be used as a psu in a gaming rig with a powerful gpu. Actually POS is an understatement, at minimum politeness is a fire hazard.

It's your choice, but personally I like my pc, so you don't intend to burn it down or blow it up when melted wiring starts shorting out or catching fire inside. But again it's your choice.

Replace the psu. It's that simple. No if's, ands or buts. It's a fire hazard, it's detrimental to you and your pc.
 
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Karadjgne

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Dec 26, 2012
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No. The gpu wants 150w, and it's pulling 150w through a wire(s) rated at 120w and remain in specs. Resistance isn't really changing, voltage isn't changing, so to get the power, amperage is way up. Which creates a lot of heat.

Ever look at the battery cables in a car? Big. Imagine a wire half that size going to the starter. You'd burn it out trying to start the car.
 
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May 3, 2019
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It doesn't really matter what Wattage a PSU is, it's about quality.
A quality 450w PSU will be stable at 450w max - and probably can get 20% more than that (like many high quality PSUs)
When you have a cheap one, think of it like cheap speakers.
Cheap speakers say they are 500watts PMPO which is a lie anyway.
So a 650watt psu, from a cheap brand is cheap because it lies and uses cheap components to make it cheap.

Name your country and how much money you have then we can look at see what the best available PSU there is where you are.
I found one......is antec NE 650W good enough
 
May 3, 2019
17
0
10
Best answers
0
There's only 2 connector on any psu that's capable of 150w 12vDC and that's a 6+2pin/8pin pcie and the EPS connector. Since the EPS will be in use, that leaves your 6pin pcie. A pcie can carry 5A per pin, and a 6pin has 2x 12vDC pins, the other 4 are ground/sense. A 6pin is physically capable of upto 120w. If you are using adapter to make a 6pin to 8pin, (8pin has 3x 12vDC, 180w) you are asking a normally 75w connector to max out rating at 120w, which is still less than the 150w demanded by the gpu. That's called melting wire time.

A decent 650w has 2x 6+2, and 2x 6pin pcie. You have a single 6pin. Simple fact is that a cheap POS psu that was never, ever, intended to be used as a psu in a gaming rig with a powerful gpu. Actually POS is an understatement, at minimum politeness is a fire hazard.

It's your choice, but personally I like my pc, so you don't intend to burn it down or blow it up when melted wiring starts shorting out or catching fire inside. But again it's your choice.

Replace the psu. It's that simple. No if's, ands or buts. It's a fire hazard, it's detrimental to you and your pc.
Thanks for helping....i will change it with better psu
 

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