Question wireless router with wifi-6 and 10Gbps ports

velocci

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thanks for the suggestion. maybe i'm asking for too much right now. if I were to get a wifi router without the 10Gbps ports and have all my wired devices plugged into a 10Gbps switch and that switch is plugged into the router, then when I transfer files from one 10Gbps device to another, will it the transfer speeds be upto 10Gbps or will it slow it down to the wifi router's 1Gbps speed?
 

Jennifer W

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Don’t know of any.
You’d have to get a 10G switch and a 10Gbps BaseStation
Be ready to spend money.

Ubiquiti has some of the best prices and their 10G (XG) switches run about $600, while their 10G (XG) AP/BaseStation run $800-$1500 depending on which one you get... and even then that’s mainly for 802.11AC use. You’ll also need a router/firewall to go with that, as well as some way to run the Unifi Client.
So yeah.

What exactly are you trying to do? Do you just want to support 10G on your wired LAN, or do you actually want all the various frequencies supported by WiFi6, or are you just after WiFi throughput?

And to answer your question from above, if you have a 10G NIC connected to a 1G NIC, the connection will auto-negotiate down to 1G. Both ends need to be support 10G in order to negotiate at that speed.
You’re limited by whatever the slowest end is.

Also be aware that some devices that are 10G may not be capable of negotiating down to 5G or 2.5G speeds (which are showing up on some higher end desktop motherboards), because they are not really that common. 1G/10G is common.... 1/2.5/5/10 (and various combinations of those) are not that common.
I have a few SFP+ MMF modules and DAC’s that can do 1G/10G... but not 2.5G or 5G (AFAIK).
 

velocci

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Right now I have a netgear WIND4500 I think is the model. Its old. Just want to upgrade. I figured might aswell get a 10G router with Wifi 6, but I guess I'm being too ambitious right now. but obviously the 10G is just for wired devices. so I'm thinking of getting just a regular 1G router and down the line I can get a 10G switch. If i plug all my wired devices into the 10G switch and two 10G devices want to transfer files to each other, they would do so at 10G right, even though the router is only 1G? So another way of asking the question is will the data go from 10G device to 10G switch to the other 10G device or will it go from the 10G device to the 10G switch to the 1G router to the 10G switch and then to the other 10G device? wow, that sounds confusing. i hope i'm making sense. Jennifer W above said it would go at 1G speeds but DeauteratedDog said it would go at 10G speeds.
 
You slightly misunderstood jennifer post. That was referring to if you plug a 10g end device into a 1g port on say a switch. That connection between that device and the switch will negotitate to 1g.

The confusion comes in part because the data can pass between actual end devices can pass a different speeds. You only think there is a direct connection between the 2 end device. The switch is in the middle making things work.

Lets say you have 1 pc connected to the switch at 10g and a second device connected at 1g. The traffic will pass between the first pc and the switch at 10g. The buffer will be moved to the port going to the 1g device and sent at 1gbit. This works fine as long as the 10g device does not try to send too much data. The switch has buffers that can hold a small amount. What normally happens is the software farther up the in the data communication will detect packet loss when data is sent too fast. It will send at a lower logical rate even though physically the data is being sent between the switch and the end device at 10g.

Still this does not matter what the router is connected at. The switch is handling all this stuff. If both end devices have 10g ports then the data runs at 10g all the way.
 

velocci

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ok thanks. so if I get a new router, i will just get one with 1G ports. But I'm also considering just getting an AP or extender for now and upgrading the router later. The whole reason for this is that my router is old and now that my wife is home, she wants to work on her laptop outside where the signal keeps dropping. so either I upgrade the router to something with more coverage (and my thought was since I'm doing this, i might aswell get wifi 6 and 10G) or get an AP or extender. So I started this thread to learn more about the router, and another thread to learn more about the AP/extender. And of course I can't decide. I'm like Sheldon in Big Bang Theory when he's deciding between a Sony Play Station or MS XBox. :)
 
Another thing that will make your decision even harder is wifi6 is already obsolete. Wifi6e which is pretty much the same but with the additional new 6g radio band. This extra radio band is going to be far more important than anything we have seen in years. The main problem with wifi6 is it uses a very dense data encoding and it attempts to use all the available bandwidth. It guarantees everyone stomps on each other and degrades the signals. Not sure when we will see wifi6e stuff. Likely first part of next year.

From what people are seeing in real life tests you only get about 600mbps rates on wifi6 so there is no need for 10g.

The coverage is not better for wifi6 it is still subject to the same maximum radio output allowed. The radio waves for all forms of wifi go the same distance as long as the router is transmitting full power. In some ways you could say the coverage for wifi6 is less. This gets into the messy question of combining the concept of speed and the concept of signal level which are not really directly related. Since wifi6 is using qam1024 to get more speed and this more easily corrupted than simpler encodings the distance you can get this level of data encoding is actually less even though the signal itself goes the same distance. You just can't decode the complex encoding sometimes especially when neighbors signal interfere.

And remember most wifi problems are the end devices not the router. Many portable devices have low power radios and small antenna.
 

velocci

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the 10G would be for my wired devices. if this is the problem with wifi6, then I will get an extender or AP and get the router in a few years. what if I have a wifi 6e router and my device is wifi6? will it benefit from 6e?
 
Not really the 6 and 6e are comptible on the 5g band but there is no way to use the extra bandwidth. If I remember correctly there is 800mhz of full power bandwidth in the 6g range. There is only 190mhz split into 2 parts in the 5g band in most countries. 802.11ax uses 160mhz blocks.

Pretty much to get the advantage people have to upgrade again. But that is what the equipment producers want, more money for them from people replacing equipment.

I don't follow extenders because they are the last possible choice. If you do not plan to use the wifi repeater option you are paying extra for something you will not use.

If you are not going to buy actual AP just buy a router with the types or radios you want. Any router can run as a AP, most modern devices have a special setting. Note you really only want AP when things like PoE power or some other similar features are important. The wifi itself is not any different.
 
Most ap that run poe only have 1 port. If you want real AP look at ubiquiti. Most people using PoE want to ceiling mount the unit or there is not easy to access power plug nearby, If you need multiple ports I would use a router. For $200 you can get tri-band routers, Still a router that has a 1200-1750 number will likely work just as well and costs less than $75 in many cases
 

velocci

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I don't need to mount it on the ceiling. I have 4 network ports in the area that I would put it. I port on the back of the AP is all I need. so you're saying a $75 router can be just as good as an AP? If that's the case, I can get that and use it as my main router and use my existing WIND4500 as the AP. but i'm not sure if the old router can be used as an AP.
 
Any router can be used as a AP. Might as well try it before you buy something new maybe it will be good enough for a year or so until wifi 6e is out and can be considered.

So if it does not have a setting that lets it be a AP what you do is plug into a LAN port. Disable the DHCP server. Set the lan IP to not conflict with the main router best outside the DHCP range the main router gives out. So if the main router uses 192.168.1.1 assign your "ap" 192.168.1.250
 
The connect via the wifi SSID and talk to the main router via mac addresses. It really is no different than internal to your main router you just do not see the cables. The wifi chips in the main router are in a way connected to the internal switch chip which then connects to the router chip. In this case it just has a extra switch and a real cable between the 2 switch chips and the router. It all will appear to the main router as being connected to the same lan. The router chip does not really know where data comes from it all is just data coming in on the connection to the lan.
 

velocci

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sorry I don't quite follow that. so other than changing the IP address of the "extender router" and disabling DHCP, what else do I need to do to it? do I have to have a different SSID for it or the same?
 

velocci

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ok i looked it up on youtube and found this video. its easy, all you do is change the IP address, disable DHCP and put the SSID name to be the same as the new one and password should be the same. am i missing anything?
 
Yes it is very easy and as you found everyone has made a youtube video on it.

It is a personal preference if you make the SSID the same or different. It they are the same the end devices will attempt to connect to the best connection based on signal strength. If they are different then you must manually tell the device where to connect. The devices sometimes are not the smartest and will stay connected to the first signal even when you move next to the other router. I tend to like to control it with different SSID but some people don't like the hassle.
 

velocci

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if you're going to make them different SSID's, why not connect this "AP router" directly to the modem instead of the main router? would that give better performance to the "AP router"?
 
A actual modem only gives you 1 IP address. That is the key function of a router in a home install...to share that 1 ip address with all the end clients.

Most modems only have 1 ethernet port anyway because of this restriction.

If you were to somehow hook multiple devices to the modem 1 random device would get a IP address and none of the others would work.

The different SSID is just a name think of it like the port number on a router. It really doesn't matter which you connect to it is all one single lan network.
 

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