Wireless Travel Guide

Michael

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Dec 31, 2007
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Archived from groups: alt.cellular,alt.cellular.verizon,alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

About 15 years ago a company in Florida called Cellular Directions published
something like this in book form however, it was more of a roaming guide for
plain old cell phone customers like myself, and was intended to help us
determine whether their might be coverage wherever we were driving or
visiting. If you will remember, back then coverage was a lot more sporadic,
the cellular providers were a lot of small independents and we didn't have
huge companies like Verizon, AT&T, Cingular, etc, that provided nationwide
coverage and published national coverage maps, so the book was of great
benefit, Back then I did a lot of cross country driving (and the books were
only $15) so I always had one on hand to tell where I could find coverage.
In addition, back then we didn't have follow me roaming so the books
published roamer access numbers, allowing folks back home to reach you on
the road if they know where you were.

Over the years, the system expanded so fast (requiring a commensurate
expansion of the book) and updates became so frequent, that Cellular
Directions could no longer afford to publish it as a $15 book for end users.
I believe they sold out to someone who put it on the web in subscription
form for about $300 per year. Too rich for this end user's blood, plus
accessing the web for information from you car while on the road just wasn't
practical so I stopped buying.

Having looked at the new website and its prices, I think the concept is
good. But considering the price, it's simply not practical for the average
cell phone customer.

Michael




"Keith" <shwemp@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1c5117d9.0405251159.2cd16826@posting.google.com...
> Has anyone purchased this?
> http://www.telecompublishing.com/WirelessTravelGuide.shtml
>
> Would like to get some feedback if possible.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Keith A.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.cellular,alt.cellular.verizon,alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

Yep, I got the fifth edition last year for Christmas. I cannot say I don't
enjoy it somewhat just due to the very geeky nature of such a book but on
the whole the book is woefully out of date. i.e. Airtouch instead of
Verizon and nothing updated. The included maps are about as wrong as wrong
can be for Oregon.
They're just 1980's style computer drawn ovals (literally) with no attempt
to approximate actual coverage. In most cases the depicted coverage area
seems to resemble what was originally available in like 1985 or something,
as the book only really shows coverage in major cities (and then with those
dumb ovals drawn which clearly don't represent actual coverage even in
1985).

Although the book clearly states that they endeavor to test the phone
numbers listed in the book, I've literally not found one of those numbers
that actually work (at least in my area). I was really under-impressed what
you get for $50 or whatever we paid for it.

It does has an amazing myriad of cellular service phone numbers and
addresses (if you can find one that is still valid)...

-Dan


"Keith" <shwemp@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1c5117d9.0405251159.2cd16826@posting.google.com...
> Has anyone purchased this?
> http://www.telecompublishing.com/WirelessTravelGuide.shtml
>
> Would like to get some feedback if possible.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Keith A.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.cellular,alt.cellular.verizon,alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

In article <P6SdnRqP8ut_KS7dRVn-hQ@adelphia.com>,
"Michael" <mpmorgan(no spam)@adelphia.net> wrote:

> About 15 years ago a company in Florida called Cellular Directions published
> something like this in book form however, it was more of a roaming guide for
> plain old cell phone customers like myself, and was intended to help us
> determine whether their might be coverage wherever we were driving or
> visiting. If you will remember, back then coverage was a lot more sporadic,
> the cellular providers were a lot of small independents and we didn't have
> huge companies like Verizon, AT&T, Cingular, etc, that provided nationwide
> coverage and published national coverage maps, so the book was of great
> benefit, Back then I did a lot of cross country driving (and the books were
> only $15) so I always had one on hand to tell where I could find coverage.
> In addition, back then we didn't have follow me roaming so the books
> published roamer access numbers, allowing folks back home to reach you on
> the road if they know where you were.
>
> Over the years, the system expanded so fast (requiring a commensurate
> expansion of the book) and updates became so frequent, that Cellular
> Directions could no longer afford to publish it as a $15 book for end users.
> I believe they sold out to someone who put it on the web in subscription
> form for about $300 per year. Too rich for this end user's blood, plus
> accessing the web for information from you car while on the road just wasn't
> practical so I stopped buying.
>
> Having looked at the new website and its prices, I think the concept is
> good. But considering the price, it's simply not practical for the average
> cell phone customer.

You mean they publish the accurate maps the Carriers promised to in the
industries "Consumer Code" but never did?
 

Michael

Distinguished
Dec 31, 2007
1,319
0
19,280
Archived from groups: alt.cellular,alt.cellular.verizon,alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

I don't know about consumer code promises made by the carriers (for that
matter, this is the first I've even heard of them). <G>

While I lacked the means to verify their accuracy, the way the maps depicted
coverage and even fringe areas suggested that professional site surveys had
been done. They were very similar to television site surveys I used to see
back in the 1960's when I was an antenna technician.

When Cellular Directions stopped publishing a hard copy book and went to web
subscriptions, they told me that the cellular industry was growing by such
leaps and bounds (not only adding new cities but adding new cell sites in
existing service areas) that they would have to publish a new book each
month, just to keep up. Because that was too expensive (and lacked accuracy
unless you bought a new book each month) they went the web instead.


"Røbert M" <rmarkoff@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:rmarkoff-1A5F8A.18055525052004@news05.east.earthlink.net...
> In article <P6SdnRqP8ut_KS7dRVn-hQ@adelphia.com>,
> "Michael" <mpmorgan(no spam)@adelphia.net> wrote:
>
> > About 15 years ago a company in Florida called Cellular Directions
published
> > something like this in book form however, it was more of a roaming guide
for
> > plain old cell phone customers like myself, and was intended to help us
> > determine whether their might be coverage wherever we were driving or
> > visiting. If you will remember, back then coverage was a lot more
sporadic,
> > the cellular providers were a lot of small independents and we didn't
have
> > huge companies like Verizon, AT&T, Cingular, etc, that provided
nationwide
> > coverage and published national coverage maps, so the book was of great
> > benefit, Back then I did a lot of cross country driving (and the books
were
> > only $15) so I always had one on hand to tell where I could find
coverage.
> > In addition, back then we didn't have follow me roaming so the books
> > published roamer access numbers, allowing folks back home to reach you
on
> > the road if they know where you were.
> >
> > Over the years, the system expanded so fast (requiring a commensurate
> > expansion of the book) and updates became so frequent, that Cellular
> > Directions could no longer afford to publish it as a $15 book for end
users.
> > I believe they sold out to someone who put it on the web in subscription
> > form for about $300 per year. Too rich for this end user's blood, plus
> > accessing the web for information from you car while on the road just
wasn't
> > practical so I stopped buying.
> >
> > Having looked at the new website and its prices, I think the concept is
> > good. But considering the price, it's simply not practical for the
average
> > cell phone customer.
>
> You mean they publish the accurate maps the Carriers promised to in the
> industries "Consumer Code" but never did?
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.cellular,alt.cellular.verizon,alt.cellular.sprintpcs (More info?)

"Michael" <mpmorgan(no spam)@adelphia.net> wrote in message news:<P6SdnRqP8ut_KS7dRVn-hQ@adelphia.com>...

> I believe they sold out to someone who put it on the web in subscription
> form for about $300 per year. Too rich for this end user's blood, plus
> accessing the web for information from you car while on the road just wasn't
> practical so I stopped buying.
>
> Having looked at the new website and its prices, I think the concept is
> good. But considering the price, it's simply not practical for the average
> cell phone customer.

From what I understand, the Wireless Travel Guide installs on your
local drive, no internet connection required to browse the content.

Also, pricing starts at $77 for a 1 year subscription.

Nonetheless, that's still way too much $$ to be attractive for most
potential users. The previous Cellular Travel Guide (5th edition) was
$19.95, and that included a 700+ page book. The new edition ships on
a CD (which costs close to nothing to duplicate) at 4 times the price.
Frankly I'm very skeptical about this business model.