Question Wondering if I did these fans right

May 5, 2019
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Hello, I just recently got 3 new fans the Thermaltake Riing Plus 12. I have 2 on the front panel and one on the top as exhaust and it seems only like half of my gpu is getting the air and the other half isn't and msi afterburner is saying the gpu temps are up at 80 which isn't really reasonable with fans. If anyone knows what I'm doing wrong here and can help id greatly appreciate it. Thanks!
View: https://imgur.com/a/vVNn4ES
 

R_1

Judicious
Herald
look at the sag on the GPU! its acting like a wing directing the air upwards. you need a support to level the GPU.

it does not take a lot especially if the pc is stationary

have any legos.
getting rid of the sag will help a bit. you may also cut a piece of cardboard to direct the fan output to the gpu
 
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hotaru251

Reputable
Oct 30, 2014
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assuming it isnt just camera angle playing tricks... if your GPU is at a serious sag it could be blocking some of the air to it and/or in extreme case not having the gpu's heatsink making proper contact.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
The exhaust at top is in a bad place. The intake fans are good, but a good portion of the airflow is lost out of the exhaust before it ever makes it to the cpu cooler. That top exhaust should be as near to the back of the case as possible, so that all the airflow actually travels towards the cpu cooler area.

What are the rpms of the intakes when the gpu is under that kind of usage? The bad part about most RGB fans is lackluster performance compared to plain fans, gotta make room in the motor housing for the RGB circuitry...

Did you adjust the curves for higher rpm? With 2 exhausts, especially the power of that AIO's fan, the intakes should be a good 300-400 ish rpm higher than the exhausts, or you'll get next to nothing by the gpu.
 
Last edited:
First of all, 80c. is a normal operating temperature for a GPU under load.
It is typical for a gpu to target 80c. as an operating temperature and then try to deliver the best performance possible, meeting that target.

As others noted, your gpu is sagging and should be corrected to prevent damage. It should not be impacting temperatures.

The two front intakes is very good.
Whatever intake air that comes in will exit somewhere taking component heat with it.
You could replace them with higher RPM versions but at the cost of more noise.
I would not bother.

I think you could remove the top exhaust fan and you would see no difference.

To help airflow around the graphics card, remove the unused slot covers at the rear.
That will allow more airflow around the bottom of the graphics card.

You could also install a slot blower like this:
https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA1K68W27711&Description=slot blower&cm_re=slot_blower-_-9SIA1K68W27711-_-Product
 
May 5, 2019
16
0
10
0
The exhaust at top is in a bad place. The intake fans are good, but a good portion of the airflow is lost out of the exhaust before it ever makes it to the cpu cooler. That top exhaust should be as near to the back of the case as possible, so that all the airflow actually travels towards the cpu cooler area.

What are the rpms of the intakes when the gpu is under that kind of usage? The bad part about most RGB fans is lackluster performance compared to plain fans, gotta make room in the motor housing for the RGB circuitry...

Did you adjust the curves for higher rpm? With 2 exhausts, especially the power of that AIO's fan, the intakes should be a good 300-400 ish rpm higher than the exhausts, or you'll get next to nothing by the gpu.
All 3 at once were at 1500 rpm and the right side of the gpu was fine but the left was super hot.
 
May 5, 2019
16
0
10
0
First of all, 80c. is a normal operating temperature for a GPU under load.
It is typical for a gpu to target 80c. as an operating temperature and then try to deliver the best performance possible, meeting that target.

As others noted, your gpu is sagging and should be corrected to prevent damage. It should not be impacting temperatures.

The two front intakes is very good.
Whatever intake air that comes in will exit somewhere taking component heat with it.
You could replace them with higher RPM versions but at the cost of more noise.
I would not bother.

I think you could remove the top exhaust fan and you would see no difference.

To help airflow around the graphics card, remove the unused slot covers at the rear.
That will allow more airflow around the bottom of the graphics card.

You could also install a slot blower like this:
https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA1K68W27711&Description=slot blower&cm_re=slot_blower-_-9SIA1K68W27711-_-Product
So the sag does not factor in the left side of the gpu being hotter than the right?
 
May 5, 2019
16
0
10
0
The exhaust at top is in a bad place. The intake fans are good, but a good portion of the airflow is lost out of the exhaust before it ever makes it to the cpu cooler. That top exhaust should be as near to the back of the case as possible, so that all the airflow actually travels towards the cpu cooler area.

What are the rpms of the intakes when the gpu is under that kind of usage? The bad part about most RGB fans is lackluster performance compared to plain fans, gotta make room in the motor housing for the RGB circuitry...

Did you adjust the curves for higher rpm? With 2 exhausts, especially the power of that AIO's fan, the intakes should be a good 300-400 ish rpm higher than the exhausts, or you'll get next to nothing by the gpu.
Also, do you think the exhaust fan can even be moved more torwards the back because theres not that much room with the aio fan.
 

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