[SOLVED] Workstation CPU

n3cw4rr10r

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AMD 4th Gen Ryzen 9 5900X Processor 3.7GHz/4.8GHz Max Boost-Hi-Perf. Sealed Liquid Cooling Dual Fan Radiator-64MB Cache 12-Core/24-Thread 105W TDP AM4 Socket 7nm

11th Gen Intel Core i7-11700KF (Without Graphics) 8-Core, 16-Threads, 16MB Cache, 3.6GHz to 5.0GHz w/Intel Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Freq. Hi-Perf. Liquid Cooled Single Fan w/Artic Silver 5 Thermal Compound

The workstation will be primarily used for Solidworks. Any reason to choose one over the other? Cost is Identical.

Other basic specs:

32gb DDR4-3600
Nvidia A2000 12gb
650 Gold PSU
 

Eximo

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Puget has a short list, but doesn't include the latest hardware.


5900X is the winner in these tests. They have another article with older CPUs, but they also include Xeons and Threadrippers and a lot more multi-threaded tests, which really would lean you towards Threadripper.
 

Eximo

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Does Solidworks have any particular recommendations? The only real difference is that the Intel chip is a monolithic design and the AMD chip uses two separate CPU dies and an I/O die. So certain tasks can be slower on AMD, but that can easily be made up with the extra 4 cores.

Costs of 10th gen seems to be on the rise. I compromised and went with the i9-10900F with 10 cores.
 

n3cw4rr10r

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Mar 14, 2013
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Does Solidworks have any particular recommendations? The only real difference is that the Intel chip is a monolithic design and the AMD chip uses two separate CPU dies and an I/O die. So certain tasks can be slower on AMD, but that can easily be made up with the extra 4 cores.

Costs of 10th gen seems to be on the rise. I compromised and went with the i9-10900F with 10 cores.
Solidworks doesnt care. Here are their recommended specs:

https://www.goengineer.com/hardware-recommendations-for-solidworks
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
Puget has a short list, but doesn't include the latest hardware.


5900X is the winner in these tests. They have another article with older CPUs, but they also include Xeons and Threadrippers and a lot more multi-threaded tests, which really would lean you towards Threadripper.
 

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