[SOLVED] Worth upgrading to a rtx 2060 considering the bottleneck?

franblackkapoli

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Is it worth it?
I'm a small budget type of guy. Underage and all that. Now I have the permission to save up and buy myself a rtx 2060 which would be huge.
However my current cpu is an i7 3770 and my gpu a gtx 1050Ti (can run recent games on low/medium) and my monitor is 1080p 60Hz. I'm gonna have 16Gb 1600 of ram pretty soon because of the bad state of my really old 8gb 1333 current ones. The ram is ddr3 due to the cpu obviously.
I would love to play games on ultra but from youtube the bottleneck seems quite a lot.
 

punkncat

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I would say it depends....

How long before you will be able to budget something newer on the mobo/CPU/RAM side?
If not within a year on the outside, I wouldn't do it. If you are going to be on that system for the foreseeable future I would look to a 570/580 (check your PSU) the RAM you mention, and SSD if you aren't already using one.
 
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franblackkapoli

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I would say it depends....

How long before you will be able to budget something newer on the mobo/CPU/RAM side?
If not within a year on the outside, I wouldn't do it. If you are going to be on that system for the foreseeable future I would look to a 570/580 (check your PSU) the RAM you mention, and SSD if you aren't already using one.
Maybe next year, I'm hoping to buy a new mobo ram and something around an i5 9400 or better(something cheap but worth it). Economics for tech pieces aren't lovely in Portugal. PSU is 550w bronze. I got an ssd but for windows only.
 
Is it worth it?
I'm a small budget type of guy. Underage and all that. Now I have the permission to save up and buy myself a rtx 2060 which would be huge.
However my current cpu is an i7 3770 and my gpu a gtx 1050Ti (can run recent games on low/medium) and my monitor is 1080p 60Hz.
Given the monitor's resolution and refresh rate, the 2060 is overkill.
In order of performance from lowest to highest, the following cards would be more suitable.
  • RX 590
  • GTX 1660
  • GTX 1660Ti
  • Vega 56
I'd say only go for the Vega 56 if you NEVER want to dip below 60fps. My personal recommendation would probably be the 1660 non-Ti.

While a lesser performer, the RX 590 would be suitable for averaging about 60 fps in most games, if there's a huge discount giving it the best bang-for-buck ratio.

This page has those cards, and a few others, with their comparisons in various games at 1920x1080 - the red lines in the graphs indicating average fps, and the black line indicating effectively the minimum fps.
 
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franblackkapoli

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Given the monitor's resolution and refresh rate, the 2060 is overkill.
In order of performance from lowest to highest, the following cards would be more suitable.
  • RX 590
  • GTX 1660
  • GTX 1660Ti
  • Vega 56
I'd say only go for the Vega 56 if you NEVER want to dip below 60fps. My personal recommendation would probably be the 1660 non-Ti.

While a lesser performer, the RX 590 would be suitable for averaging about 60 fps in most games, if there's a huge discount giving it the best bang-for-buck ratio.

This page has those cards, and a few others, with their comparisons in various games at 1920x1080 - the red lines in the graphs indicating average fps, and the black line indicating effectively the minimum fps.
I like the idea of overkill on this case because I rarely buy pc parts and if I buy a gpu I want a long lasting one. Next on the list it would be the cpu mobo and ram and after that an aoc 24" 144hz monitor. I can save up for all that I just need permission to buy it (hardest part amazingly). But the idea of getting a 1660 Ti (or non Ti) seems pretty good too thanks.
 
The argument against buying now for something that will last long(ish) into the future is that it's not that cost effective.

For example, if you're not getting the 144hz monitor until, say, 3 years from now, but you buy a video card today that can handle that - well, when you finally get the monitor, the video card to handle that need would probably cost significantly less than it does today.
 
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franblackkapoli

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The argument against buying now for something that will last long(ish) into the future is that it's not that cost effective.

For example, if you're not getting the 144hz monitor until, say, 3 years from now, but you buy a video card today that can handle that - well, when you finally get the monitor, the video card to handle that need would probably cost significantly less than it does today.
As it turns out I'm just gonna fully upgrade my build, RTX 2060/2070 (prob 2070 tbh) Ryzen 7 2700X 16 gb 2666 ddr4 a new mobo a new psu and a new monitor. in the space of 2 and a half years I'll probably have that. However I might prioritize the cpu mobo and ram combo instead of the gpu. the problem is that my current gpu massively bottlenecks the ryzen 7. And if I buy the rtx 2070 first at least I can run games on ultra/high. But thanks for your answer!
 
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As it turns out I'm just gonna fully upgrade my build, RTX 2060/2070 (prob 2070 tbh) Ryzen 7 2700X 16 gb 2666 ddr4 a new mobo a new psu and a new monitor. in the space of 2 and a half years I'll probably have that. However I might prioritize the cpu mobo and ram combo instead of the gpu. the problem is that my current gpu massively bottlenecks the ryzen 7. And if I buy the rtx 2070 first at least I can run games on ultra/high. But thanks for your answer!
Not necessarily - right now, the "bottleneck," as it were, is really the monitor. Often, though, GPU and monitor sort of go hand-in-hand.

I mean, you could, say, pick up an RX 570 4GB and see a noticeable improvement - it'll handle medium-to-high details, though not max details (definitely better than the 1050Ti, though), at 60fps for 1920x1080, and there are at least two models of that card currently available for $120 in the US.

(disclaimer: if your motherboard doesn't have UEFI, then most likely the modern AMD cards won't work)

Still, if you're comfortable with the performance you're getting now, holding off and socking the money away until you can upgrade everything will get you the most bang for your buck when you get to that point.
 
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franblackkapoli

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Sep 6, 2018
16
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515
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Not necessarily - right now, the "bottleneck," as it were, is really the monitor. Often, though, GPU and monitor sort of go hand-in-hand.

I mean, you could, say, pick up an RX 570 4GB and see a noticeable improvement - it'll handle medium-to-high details, though not max details (definitely better than the 1050Ti, though), at 60fps for 1920x1080, and there are at least two models of that card currently available for $120 in the US.

(disclaimer: if your motherboard doesn't have UEFI, then most likely the modern AMD cards won't work)

Still, if you're comfortable with the performance you're getting now, holding off and socking the money away until you can upgrade everything will get you the most bang for your buck when you get to that point.
I might do that (buy everything at once when I have the money). Thanks for the help and responses.
 
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