Question Would 2 routers provide higher bandwidth/reduce bandwidth-related problems?

SirJimie

Reputable
Apr 3, 2015
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4,510
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Hi guys.

I currently have rather poor internet speeds (7Mbps down, 1Mbps up), and due to the mostly large number of devices connected to our router (+ bandwidth-hogging devices, e.g. streaming devices), the internet becomes essentially unusable besides general internet browsing.

I am currently using a Modem Router provided by my ISP. So I was thinking, would it be possible to connect another 3rd party router (e.g. TP-Link Router) to my current existing Modem Router, and then connect all the bandwidth hogging devices to one router and then the rest of the devices to the other. Would this help improve bandwidth-related issues or would it not have any impact at all?

I am not entirely knowledgeable of the networking aspect of IT, so my apologies if I may be asking a silly question.

I would also appreciate it if this isn't a particularly good solution, then what other solutions could I try to minimise bandwidth-related network issues and to minimise latency/ping problems on the network?

I like to do a fair bit of online gaming, hence why I don't want high latency.
 

davidgirgis

Reputable
Feb 24, 2016
230
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Routing should occur on only one device on your network.
You may connect your TP-Link to your ISP's router, but it may not improve your bandwidth much, if at all.

Only one device should function as the DHCP server on your network. It leases/gives out a different IP Address to each connected device.

I know, a lot of terms, right?

In the router's setup, you should be able to enable/disable DHCP server.

To proceed with your suggestion, I recommend disabling DHCP on your ISP's modem/router. This means that it will function as a modem only.

Then, connect the TP-Link wireless router to one of the wired Ethernet ports on the back of your ISP's modem/router. Everything should work just fine.

The bandwidth limitation could be your ISP, your networking hardware being old or hasn't been updated in a while, or both.

Connect one device at a time, to help troubleshoot the problem. Have you asked your ISP for a better/more up to date plan that has better download speeds?
 

Mr.Spock

Prominent
Dec 8, 2019
521
55
590
27
it might help to understand your flavor of internet service and expected speeds

DSL or cable or fiber? from what you stated looks like DSL?

Hi guys.

I currently have rather poor internet speeds (7Mbps down, 1Mbps up), and due to the mostly large number of devices connected to our router (+ bandwidth-hogging devices, e.g. streaming devices), the internet becomes essentially unusable besides general internet browsing.

I am currently using a Modem Router provided by my ISP. So I was thinking, would it be possible to connect another 3rd party router (e.g. TP-Link Router) to my current existing Modem Router, and then connect all the bandwidth hogging devices to one router and then the rest of the devices to the other. Would this help improve bandwidth-related issues or would it not have any impact at all?

I am not entirely knowledgeable of the networking aspect of IT, so my apologies if I may be asking a silly question.

I would also appreciate it if this isn't a particularly good solution, then what other solutions could I try to minimise bandwidth-related network issues and to minimise latency/ping problems on the network?

I like to do a fair bit of online gaming, hence why I don't want high latency.
 

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