[SOLVED] Would an Ethernet splitter solve my router congestion issue?

Aug 10, 2019
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My Ethernet (100 mbps down, 10 mpbs up) frequently drops packets under periods of high load, such as online gaming or streaming. The network is shared between three PCs, all connected to a good-quality router. Both housemates had the same issue when tested, but they don't mind it.

I found that by connecting my Cat5 directly to the modem, the packet loss and choke goes away completely. This isn't a viable fix because our modem has only one Cat5 port (reserved for the router).

Would you expect a standard female-to-male Ethernet splitter to solve this issue? If I plugged my Cat5 into one female end and the router to another other, would this let me bypass whatever congestion is occurring through the router?
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Splitter-Ethernet-RJ45-Cable-Adapter-1-Male-To-3-Female-Port-LAN-Network-Plug/707888612
Thank you!
 
No, those splitters don't do anything.

But then I don't know what exactly your prob is, 100 mbit should be good enough for 3 users. U didn't say whether all 3 users, 1 or 2 or 3 are on WIFI, which is subceptible to EMI, and for all I know you are on old 802.11g.
 
Aug 10, 2019
3
0
10
0
No, those splitters don't do anything.

But then I don't know what exactly your prob is, 100 mbit should be good enough for 3 users. U didn't say whether all 3 users, 1 or 2 or 3 are on WIFI, which is subceptible to EMI, and for all I know you are on old 802.11g.
All 3 on Ethernet. The router (Netgear R6400) has four Cat5 ports, 3 connected to our individual PCs and 1 to a printer on standby. Any known issues with this router regarding packet loss during gaming? Firmware update or downgrade possibly?
 
Those cable splitter things do not function the way you think they do. They are not really used for adding more ports, they must be used in pairs. There is very little valid use for them.

What you would want is a switch BUT it will not work anyway. In addition to only having 1 port the modem only will give you 1 IP address.....I suppose you could pay the isp for more if they offer it. This means either the router or your pc gets the IP both will not function at the same time.

This is why you have a router its purpose is to share that single IP address.

All the ports on your router are gigabit speed so it is not likely you have any bottleneck in the ports or cabling.

Try to unplug the other pc and run only your PC connected to the router. Maybe one of the other devices is causing some conflict or it is using lots of bandwidth.

You could try to factory reset the router and then configure only the wifi passwords and admin passwords. There could be some firewall or QoS setting in the router that was configured by accident.
 

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