Would J.R.R. Tolkien have enjoyed playing 3E?

G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

Dirk Collins wrote:
> What do you believe about that?

I'm pretty sure there are references to this in The Silmarillon, actually.

- Ron ^*^
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

Dirk Collins <dirk.collins@Earthlink.Net> writes
>Would J.R.R. Tolkien have enjoyed playing 3E?
>What do you believe about that?

Personally, I don't think so. D&D isn't scholastic in nature, and
Tolkien was primarily a scholar.

--
Ian R Malcomson
"Once the game is over, the king and the pawn go back in the same box"
 

Matthias

Distinguished
Jul 1, 2003
137
0
18,680
Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

On Fri, 01 Apr 2005 00:37:15 GMT, Dirk Collins <dirk.collins@Earthlink.Net>
wrote:

>What do you believe about that?
>
>Re,
>Dirk

As I understand it, Tolkein didn't want The Source Material (aka LOTR)
published. The whole saga was meant to be an experiment in language development.
He was trying to create a language from scratch -- literally -- using a whole
lotta backstory and customized mythology and evolving cultures, all of which
contribute to the development of his invented languages.

Later on, his books get published as fiction and everyone loves them.

After that, somebody makes a tabletop war-game based on the books.

Some years beyond that, the war-game evolves into a character-based adventuring
game where storytelling becomes as important as winning the battle or the war,
and finally into a "roleplaying game" where acting becomes as integral to the
experience as the simulated combat and storytelling.

I don't know about Tolkein, but I think I might feel that "my baby" has gotten
all dirtied up and cheapened by this strange game that was turned into a pastime
for a small group of mainly adolesents who could hardly appreciate the work that
had to go into the creation of an entirely fictional yet functional and
realistic language.

--

Matthias (matthias_mls@yahoo.com)

"Scientists tend to do philosophy about as well as you'd expect philosophers to
do science, the difference being that at least the philosophers usually *know*
when they're out of their depth."
-Jeff Heikkinen
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

Suddenly, Matthias, drunk as a lemur, stumbled out of the darkness and
exclaimed:

> As I understand it, Tolkein didn't want The Source Material (aka LOTR)
> published. The whole saga was meant to be an experiment in language
> development.
>

On the extra material for the LoTR movies, several of his friends and some
Tolkien scholars say that he envisioned Middle Earth as a shared universe
where other people would write stories or songs, paint paintings, etc.

--
Billy Yank

Quinn: "I'm saying it us, or them."
Murphy: "Well I choose them."
Q: "That's NOT an option!"
M: "Then you shouldn't have framed it as one."
-Sealab 2021

Billy Yank's Baldur's Gate Photo Portraits
http://members.bellatlantic.net/~vze2xvw6/
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

Dirk Collins wrote:
> What do you believe about that?

I fail to see how it's relevant. D&D has just about as much to do with
tolkein's origional writings (by origional I mean the first time he
wrote them, not that they were origional thoughts and stories) as
stick-ball has to do with watching Field of Dreams. And I'm not
particularly fond of tolkein as a storyteller, so while he mayh or may
not enjoy D&D I would not enjoy having him at my table.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

On Mon, 04 Apr 2005 14:37:08 GMT, Anivair scrawled:

> I fail to see how it's relevant. D&D has just about as much to do with
> tolkein's origional writings (by origional I mean the first time he
> wrote them, not that they were origional thoughts and stories) as
> stick-ball has to do with watching Field of Dreams. And I'm not
> particularly fond of tolkein as a storyteller, so while he mayh or may
> not enjoy D&D I would not enjoy having him at my table.
>

I wouldn't really like to have a corpse at the table either.

--
http://www.rexx.co.uk

To email me, visit the site.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

On Mon, 04 Apr 2005 15:16:39 +0000, Rexx Magnus wrote:

> I wouldn't really like to have a corpse at the table either.

Hey, lets not discriminate against undead gamers. If they can't find
acceptance among fantasy freaks, where can they turn?

Rob
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

Matthias wrote:
> On Fri, 01 Apr 2005 00:37:15 GMT, Dirk Collins
<dirk.collins@Earthlink.Net>
> wrote:
>
> >What do you believe about that?
>
> As I understand it, Tolkein didn't want The Source Material (aka
LOTR)
> published.

This is grossly inaccurate. Tolkien wrote LOTR because his publisher
asked him to write a sequel to THE HOBBIT.

--
Justin Bacon
triad3204@aol.com
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

Rob van Riel wrote:
> Rexx Magnus wrote:
> > I wouldn't really like to have a corpse at the table either.
>
> Hey, lets not discriminate against undead gamers. If they can't find
> acceptance among fantasy freaks, where can they turn?

Indeed. That corpse just might smell better than some gamers I've met.
 

Tim

Distinguished
Mar 31, 2004
1,833
0
19,780
Archived from groups: rec.games.frp.dnd (More info?)

>> I wouldn't really like to have a corpse at the table either.
>
> Hey, lets not discriminate against undead gamers. If they can't find
> acceptance among fantasy freaks, where can they turn?

They can always join a Goth Band.