Question would my pc bottleneck

Jacob_214

Commendable
Aug 2, 2017
7
0
1,510
0
i have a $1200 budget, im 16 and buying it with my own money. recommendations to make it better? im also aiming for an rgb build too just keep that in mind if you are to make recommendations / a new pcpartpicker list ty. I STRICTLY DO NOT WANT AN AMD GPU! NVIDIA ONLY.

this is my current planned rig and was wondering if it will bottleneck.
https://pcpartpicker.com/user/efekt408/saved/dqkykL
 

Ak74Egy

Reputable
Jun 4, 2016
297
3
4,965
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First off, no you wouldn't bottle neck, but I think for you budget you can do much better, this could be better IMO, for an extra $40 if you can fork it out:

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($329.00 @ B&H)
Motherboard: Asus ROG STRIX B450-F GAMING ATX AM4 Motherboard ($119.89 @ OutletPC)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($94.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Corsair MP510 240 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($44.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($41.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB XC ULTRA GAMING Video Card ($469.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT H500 ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Best Buy)
Power Supply: SeaSonic EVO Edition 620 W 80+ Bronze Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($69.89 @ OutletPC)
Total: $1240.73
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-08-21 00:53 EDT-0400
 
What screen resolution and refresh rate will you be gaming at? It might be worth spending a bit more on the CPU if you will be using a 1080p high refresh rate monitor. Perhaps something like a Ryzen 3600 for $200, which can offer around 15% more performance than an overclocked 2600 in CPU-limited scenarios, albeit at a somewhat higher price. At 1440p or higher resolution the 2600 might be alright though.

Aside from that, I would not spend $90 on a 256GB SATA SSD, considering you can now get 1TB SSDs with similar performance for around $100. You won't likely benefit from a "Pro" SSD unless you are using it for some task that writes constantly to the drive, where the increased number of available write cycles could be of some use. And aside from your OS and applications, you won't be able to store many games on such a small drive, so you would be stuck loading them from the slow hard drive instead. You would probably be better off replacing both with something like a 1TB Intel 660p NVME SSD for under $100. That drive should provide better read performance than a SATA SSD, and while it might not be the best option for heavy sustained write workloads, it should be good for most typical usage scenarios, like loading games and applications.
 

Jacob_214

Commendable
Aug 2, 2017
7
0
1,510
0
What screen resolution and refresh rate will you be gaming at? It might be worth spending a bit more on the CPU if you will be using a 1080p high refresh rate monitor. Perhaps something like a Ryzen 3600 for $200, which can offer around 15% more performance than an overclocked 2600 in CPU-limited scenarios, albeit at a somewhat higher price. At 1440p or higher resolution the 2600 might be alright though.

Aside from that, I would not spend $90 on a 256GB SATA SSD, considering you can now get 1TB SSDs with similar performance for around $100. You won't likely benefit from a "Pro" SSD unless you are using it for some task that writes constantly to the drive, where the increased number of available write cycles could be of some use. And aside from your OS and applications, you won't be able to store many games on such a small drive, so you would be stuck loading them from the slow hard drive instead. You would probably be better off replacing both with something like a 1TB Intel 660p NVME SSD for under $100. That drive should provide better read performance than a SATA SSD, and while it might not be the best option for heavy sustained write workloads, it should be good for most typical usage scenarios, like loading games and applications.
1920x1080 64Hz - thank you for the storage recommendation definitely would be looking into that more
 

Jacob_214

Commendable
Aug 2, 2017
7
0
1,510
0
First off, no you wouldn't bottle neck, but I think for you budget you can do much better, this could be better IMO, for an extra $40 if you can fork it out:

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($329.00 @ B&H)
Motherboard: Asus ROG STRIX B450-F GAMING ATX AM4 Motherboard ($119.89 @ OutletPC)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($94.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Corsair MP510 240 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($44.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($41.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB XC ULTRA GAMING Video Card ($469.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT H500 ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Best Buy)
Power Supply: SeaSonic EVO Edition 620 W 80+ Bronze Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($69.89 @ OutletPC)
Total: $1240.73
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-08-21 00:53 EDT-0400
i can go 1400 max if i really wanted too but i need money for peripherals etc. thank you guys for the recommendations. 101% will be looking into it more
 
One other thing worth pointing out, the recently-released RTX 2060 SUPER performs within about 4-5% of a 2070 when the cards are not CPU-limited, and features the same 8GB of VRAM, with prices starting around $400. Or there are some 2070s priced as little as $430 for that bit of extra performance.

Either of these cards are probably overkill for a 1080p 64Hz display though. They're arguably a better fit for a 1080p 144Hz screen, or for 1440p. You might want to consider looking into a monitor upgrade, since while these cards can push 100-200fps in most recent games at 1080p, you'll only get limited benefit out of that if your monitor is only redrawing the scene 64 times per second. There are a number of 1080p 144Hz screens priced around $200 or so.
 

Serinox

Commendable
Jun 23, 2017
221
3
1,765
41
I would suggest something like this:

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor ($133.00 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 RGB Black Edition 57.3 CFM CPU Cooler ($38.99 @ Best Buy)
Motherboard: Gigabyte X470 AORUS ULTRA GAMING ATX AM4 Motherboard ($139.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($94.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Intel 660p Series 1.02 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($94.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital RE 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($39.63 @ Amazon)
Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB Video Card ($499.99 @ Best Buy)
Case: NZXT H500 ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Best Buy)
Power Supply: SeaSonic FOCUS Plus Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($83.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Total: $1195.56
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-08-21 02:47 EDT-0400


I would recommended not to spend more on the cpu right now and rather upgrade it in a year to ryzen 4000 series if need be. But the 2600 should be up to the task anyways.
 

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