Question Would the ethernet wall outlet in my room support a additional router ?

Sep 17, 2021
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So I recently did a cable run from within the walls directly to my main router (about 30 ft away) and speeds are good but i would still like to purchase a gaming router from Asus for additional low latency features and packet priority etc would this result in what's called " double NAT "?
appreciate the help !
 
Maybe you should buy a router with a big shinny sticker that says "TURBO" on it. Gaming routers are all marketing to silly gamers who think there is some magic that will make them more "skilled" in a games.

So first all gaming routers do is have some pre configured QoS settings. Any somewhat quality router has QoS setting you can configure yourself.

So first you must actually have a problem QoS can fix. All QoS does is decide which data goes first. When you have a high speed internet connection pretty much all data is being send immediately there is never a data queue and there is no choice to be made. So in these cases QoS does nothing and can actually slow down a very faster internet connection because of all the CPU overhead. In addition you can only really fix UPLOAD overload connections not so much download which is much more common. Real QoS would have to be done on the ISP side before the data is sent to you. By the time your router gets the data the bandwidth is already consumed and packets are already delayed or discarded. There are very fancy forms of QoS that can partially fix this but so called "gaming" routers do not use this method.

Pretty much the only people that need to worry about QoS are people that have slower DSL connections almost everyone else faster connections and will never exceed their bandwidth.

In your case you have a addition issue even if you have a slow internet connection. It is not the double NAT that will only affect your ability to host games. The problem is say you have a machine connected to the main router using up all the bandwidth. Your secondary router can not even see this traffic so it can do nothing. Any form of QoS must be on the main router that has the actual internet connection because that is where the data queue actually occurs

Stop believing gamer forums and facebook posts where you have people parrot marketing garbage with no actual knowledge. Very technically adding any router to the path will actually increase your latency because of the overhead.....but it is so tiny you can't measure it.
 

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Maybe you should buy a router with a big shinny sticker that says "TURBO" on it. Gaming routers are all marketing to silly gamers who think there is some magic that will make them more "skilled" in a games.

So first all gaming routers do is have some pre configured QoS settings. Any somewhat quality router has QoS setting you can configure yourself.

So first you must actually have a problem QoS can fix. All QoS does is decide which data goes first. When you have a high speed internet connection pretty much all data is being send immediately there is never a data queue and there is no choice to be made. So in these cases QoS does nothing and can actually slow down a very faster internet connection because of all the CPU overhead. In addition you can only really fix UPLOAD overload connections not so much download which is much more common. Real QoS would have to be done on the ISP side before the data is sent to you. By the time your router gets the data the bandwidth is already consumed and packets are already delayed or discarded. There are very fancy forms of QoS that can partially fix this but so called "gaming" routers do not use this method.

Pretty much the only people that need to worry about QoS are people that have slower DSL connections almost everyone else faster connections and will never exceed their bandwidth.

In your case you have a addition issue even if you have a slow internet connection. It is not the double NAT that will only affect your ability to host games. The problem is say you have a machine connected to the main router using up all the bandwidth. Your secondary router can not even see this traffic so it can do nothing. Any form of QoS must be on the main router that has the actual internet connection because that is where the data queue actually occurs

Stop believing gamer forums and facebook posts where you have people parrot marketing garbage with no actual knowledge. Very technically adding any router to the path will actually increase your latency because of the overhead.....but it is so tiny you can't measure it.
When you install Merlin on an Asus router, you can get advanced QOS algorithms like FQ_Codel and CAKE. Both of which are also traffic shaping algorithms which work on both download and upload. If say you have 2 kids in your house with a 100mbps connection. 1 kid launches a game update which is 60GB. That'll saturate the internet connection for at least 10 minutes. The other kid is trying to game but will be laggy and stutter for those 10 minutes. If you have FQ_Codel or Cake enabled, they'll step in and throttle the entire connection to 85mbps because you're supposed to set your limit to 10-15% below your average ISP speed. Then they'll throttle the console update down to 80mbps and keep 5mbps for the kid that's gaming. Both parties will be somewhat happy with the situation. I've used it, installed it on multiple friends houses, and use it on my own house. I've also tested multiple scenarios with several computers, tablets and game consoles in my house. I do believe in these algorithms. They don't solve everything, and aren't perfect. You may get an occasional stutter, but for situations where people are hogging bandwidth, it really does traffic shape in an equitable manner.

The downside is these algorithms are very CPU intensive. Even the best Asus ARM SOC routers can only manage to traffic shape up to about 300-400mbps. If you have an internet plan which is less than that, then you're fine. But if you have a higher internet plan, these algorithims will limit your top speed to whatever the CPU can handle.

For the OP, it really depends on the situation, QOS won't help with latency unless you're getting buffer bloat. This will be seen as large lag spikes in your connection. If you're just trying to shave 10ms on average off your connection, QOS won't do that for you. So if say your have a 200mbps connection, and 3 people are watching youtube and netflix while you game, then QOS will likely do nothing for you as you are nowhere near your top speed.

Also adding another router would put you into a double NAT situation. You don't want that, you should upgrade your main router if you want QOS features. Now, if you're using wifi for your PC, then adding another access point to that location would help with signal strength and fix lag related to interference noise. But it's much better to just run an ethernet cable directly to your PC.
 
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