[SOLVED] xmp and dcop questions

froggy8

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hi guys,

i have only just found out about this while doing benchmark on it, when i checked my ram, it said something like my ram is not performing right and that i should try xmp. when i changed it to profile 1, it gave me a message saying it is performing good now and at 48 percent. so i thought i would try the 2nd profile and that gave me extra 6 percent at 54. question is is this safe in long run?

also i am thinking about activating dcop too just so i dont waste any of the ram as i think the motherboard limits the rams speed.

many thanks guys
 

boju

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It's safe. Xmp/Docp is just a mode which reads the memory's embedded profile, like a preset, and adjusts motherboard's ram settings accordingly to the memory's specification. Not only does Xmp/Docp allow you to set the maximum speed the modules are capable of but it also sets primary/secondary timings and voltage as well for stability.

Run Cpuz and look under SPD tab to check your ram's Xmp profile speeds. Memory tab will say the frequency they are currently running at. This reading is in single data rate so it'll be halved, times it by two for double data rate.

Docp is a terminology used by Asus on their boards, it is Xmp under a different name. Unlike other motherboard manufacturer's, Asus doesn't pay Intel royalties for the naming scheme. So for Gigabyte, Asrock and others, it'll be Xmp and not Docp.

Ram profiles consists of Jedec and Xmp. Jedec is the standard plug and play speeds. By default and convenience, ram should work straight off without Bios interaction, albeit at lower speeds. Xmp isn't plug and play and requires the user to set the profile in the Bios as you have done to reach maximum safe rated speeds. This will change with DDR5 spec when memory have onboard power regulator module to allow fastest speeds immediately.

Xmp doesn't always assume you'll get the fastest speeds though, lucky for you, you could. Other things to factor in is the motherboard, processor's memory controller and the ram modules themselves.

Motherboard needs to be able to support the desired ram speeds and the cpu's memory controller comes into play if the motherboard can't. Mostly with Intel boards, there are different chipset within the same generation, ie H410, B460, H470 and Z490. Only Z (flagship) chipset allows for upping ram speeds over the cpu's memory controller. The rest will limit speeds to what the cpu is rated for regardless if the motherboard supports Xmp. Amd do it differently and for the most part can achieve maximum rated ram speeds regardless of chipset. Though Amd can be a bit more fussy about the IC chips used on ram, ie Hynix vs Samsung. Depending on the Die's used results can vary.

Motherboard and processor website have the information one would cross reference to determine memory speed potential.
 

boju

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It's safe. Xmp/Docp is just a mode which reads the memory's embedded profile, like a preset, and adjusts motherboard's ram settings accordingly to the memory's specification. Not only does Xmp/Docp allow you to set the maximum speed the modules are capable of but it also sets primary/secondary timings and voltage as well for stability.

Run Cpuz and look under SPD tab to check your ram's Xmp profile speeds. Memory tab will say the frequency they are currently running at. This reading is in single data rate so it'll be halved, times it by two for double data rate.

Docp is a terminology used by Asus on their boards, it is Xmp under a different name. Unlike other motherboard manufacturer's, Asus doesn't pay Intel royalties for the naming scheme. So for Gigabyte, Asrock and others, it'll be Xmp and not Docp.

Ram profiles consists of Jedec and Xmp. Jedec is the standard plug and play speeds. By default and convenience, ram should work straight off without Bios interaction, albeit at lower speeds. Xmp isn't plug and play and requires the user to set the profile in the Bios as you have done to reach maximum safe rated speeds. This will change with DDR5 spec when memory have onboard power regulator module to allow fastest speeds immediately.

Xmp doesn't always assume you'll get the fastest speeds though, lucky for you, you could. Other things to factor in is the motherboard, processor's memory controller and the ram modules themselves.

Motherboard needs to be able to support the desired ram speeds and the cpu's memory controller comes into play if the motherboard can't. Mostly with Intel boards, there are different chipset within the same generation, ie H410, B460, H470 and Z490. Only Z (flagship) chipset allows for upping ram speeds over the cpu's memory controller. The rest will limit speeds to what the cpu is rated for regardless if the motherboard supports Xmp. Amd do it differently and for the most part can achieve maximum rated ram speeds regardless of chipset. Though Amd can be a bit more fussy about the IC chips used on ram, ie Hynix vs Samsung. Depending on the Die's used results can vary.

Motherboard and processor website have the information one would cross reference to determine memory speed potential.
 

froggy8

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Nov 23, 2019
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It's safe. Xmp/Docp is just a mode which reads the memory's embedded profile, like a preset, and adjusts motherboard's ram settings accordingly to the memory's specification. Not only does Xmp/Docp allow you to set the maximum speed the modules are capable of but it also sets primary/secondary timings and voltage as well for stability.

Run Cpuz and look under SPD tab to check your ram's Xmp profile speeds. Memory tab will say the frequency they are currently running at. This reading is in single data rate so it'll be halved, times it by two for double data rate.

Docp is a terminology used by Asus on their boards, it is Xmp under a different name. Unlike other motherboard manufacturer's, Asus doesn't pay Intel royalties for the naming scheme. So for Gigabyte, Asrock and others, it'll be Xmp and not Docp.

Ram profiles consists of Jedec and Xmp. Jedec is the standard plug and play speeds. By default and convenience, ram should work straight off without Bios interaction, albeit at lower speeds. Xmp isn't plug and play and requires the user to set the profile in the Bios as you have done to reach maximum safe rated speeds. This will change with DDR5 spec when memory have onboard power regulator module to allow fastest speeds immediately.

Xmp doesn't always assume you'll get the fastest speeds though, lucky for you, you could. Other things to factor in is the motherboard, processor's memory controller and the ram modules themselves.

Motherboard needs to be able to support the desired ram speeds and the cpu's memory controller comes into play if the motherboard can't. Mostly with Intel boards, there are different chipset within the same generation, ie H410, B460, H470 and Z490. Only Z (flagship) chipset allows for upping ram speeds over the cpu's memory controller. The rest will limit speeds to what the cpu is rated for regardless if the motherboard supports Xmp. Amd do it differently and for the most part can achieve maximum rated ram speeds regardless of chipset. Though Amd can be a bit more fussy about the IC chips used on ram, ie Hynix vs Samsung. Depending on the Die's used results can vary.

Motherboard and processor website have the information one would cross reference to determine memory speed potential.
many thanks for that

this is my set up

Mainboard: ASRock Z87 Extreme 4
Processor: Intel i5 4570S 2.90GHz
Memory: Kingston Hyper Beast 16GB PC3-12800
GPU 1: nVidia GeForce GTX 480
Power: Corsair CX600 Modular
Case: typhoo pro
Hard Disk: Seagate 1TB
ssd: 256gb
hard disk: 2tb

i am guessing my cpu and motherboard can handle the ram.
 

froggy8

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It's safe. Xmp/Docp is just a mode which reads the memory's embedded profile, like a preset, and adjusts motherboard's ram settings accordingly to the memory's specification. Not only does Xmp/Docp allow you to set the maximum speed the modules are capable of but it also sets primary/secondary timings and voltage as well for stability.

Run Cpuz and look under SPD tab to check your ram's Xmp profile speeds. Memory tab will say the frequency they are currently running at. This reading is in single data rate so it'll be halved, times it by two for double data rate.

Docp is a terminology used by Asus on their boards, it is Xmp under a different name. Unlike other motherboard manufacturer's, Asus doesn't pay Intel royalties for the naming scheme. So for Gigabyte, Asrock and others, it'll be Xmp and not Docp.

Ram profiles consists of Jedec and Xmp. Jedec is the standard plug and play speeds. By default and convenience, ram should work straight off without Bios interaction, albeit at lower speeds. Xmp isn't plug and play and requires the user to set the profile in the Bios as you have done to reach maximum safe rated speeds. This will change with DDR5 spec when memory have onboard power regulator module to allow fastest speeds immediately.

Xmp doesn't always assume you'll get the fastest speeds though, lucky for you, you could. Other things to factor in is the motherboard, processor's memory controller and the ram modules themselves.

Motherboard needs to be able to support the desired ram speeds and the cpu's memory controller comes into play if the motherboard can't. Mostly with Intel boards, there are different chipset within the same generation, ie H410, B460, H470 and Z490. Only Z (flagship) chipset allows for upping ram speeds over the cpu's memory controller. The rest will limit speeds to what the cpu is rated for regardless if the motherboard supports Xmp. Amd do it differently and for the most part can achieve maximum rated ram speeds regardless of chipset. Though Amd can be a bit more fussy about the IC chips used on ram, ie Hynix vs Samsung. Depending on the Die's used results can vary.

Motherboard and processor website have the information one would cross reference to determine memory speed potential.
here is the picture of the cpuz

https://i.postimg.cc/TPcVBrzw/ram-1.jpg


look at the spd one, its showing 2 ram as xmp but the other 2 as jedec, im confused by this as i have 4 ram but it seems i have only activated 2?
 

boju

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That's not all your ram, that's showing specs for a single stick in slot #1 out of 4. This memory module has four profiles, the standard Jedec speeds of 609 & 666 and then Xmp 2400 & 2133, going left to right. Currently, speeds for all ram is running at 2133. 1066*2 under memory tab = 2133 DDR.

Xmp 2400 should be faster.

Kingston Hyper Beast 16GB PC3-12800 is 1600MHz ram, you actually have PC3-19200 version.
 
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froggy8

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That's not all your ram, that's showing specs for a single stick in slot #1 out of 4. This memory module has four profiles, the standard Jedec speeds of 609 & 666 and then Xmp 2400 & 2133, going left to right. Currently, speeds for all ram is running at 2133. 1066*2 under memory tab = 2133 DDR.

Xmp 2400 should be faster.

Kingston Hyper Beast 16GB PC3-12800 is 1600MHz ram, you actually have PC3-19200 version.
how do i change it to xmp 2400?
 

froggy8

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its quite strange but it shows profile 1 as 2400 but profile 2 is 2133.

when i did the benchmark, profile 1 came up as 48 percent but profile 2 came up with 54 percent which to me is better.
 
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froggy8

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They compare equal hardware so 2133 ram will be compared to 2133mhz ram, the same for 2400 means that you can't compare 2133mhz to 2400mhz via their tool.

Would be nice to see the link for the whole benchmark, gives bios info as well for instance.
do you mean this:

https://i.postimg.cc/8CN1ZTyV/bench.jpg

If that's all you play then 2133 or 2400 isn't going to matter a whole lot. Flash games aren't taxing at all, so really, just stick with whichever ram speed you're comfortable with.
thank you will just stick with what i have got for now.
 

Karadjgne

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There's an extremely minute possibility that someone else using cpu benchmark has the exact same setup as you. So what they do is comparisons per item, based on that item. You are hitting 61% with hyperx 2133 because it's balanced against other hyperx 2133, which has different subtimings or other software using it etc, so you are better off than 61% of them. When using it set to 2400, you are judged against other 2400 users, whom probably have adjusted timings tighter or overclocked their pc or streamlined it in other fashion, so you are at 45% better than the worst.

It's not a reflection of your performance, but a reflection of your performance vrs others out there with 2400MHz ddr3 ram.

Use either profile, doesn't really matter to Intel, anything above 1600 is beyond stock memory controller speeds, so it's only real advantage will be in very few games or apps that can actually benefit from the faster ram. And I do mean very few.

With Intels, the balance of speed vs timings is more important than speeds alone. 2133 cl9 is faster than 2400 cl11. Picture it as 2133 being the speed your legs are moving, but CL being the amount of strides to cover the distance. 9 long strides at 2133 takes less time than someone moving their feet at 2400 taking 11 shorter strides. The first running at a lope, the second shuffling like a geisha. The total distance being the same.

Games use small files, as do most things, the code description of a gun type object is tiny, so they zip right through the ram quickly and don't take much effort to do so. It's with the extra large files like photoshop and video editing etc use where those huge files have to move through the ram at the same speed as the small files that ram speeds can matter.

It's all about how fast you can get the data in the door, across the floor and out the other door. Doing that with a bus load of little kids in a steady stream is easy. Trying to do it with the same amount of 6'6" 450lb men is a whole different ballgame.
 
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froggy8

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No copy what is in the search bar when the results open and post here.

As said does it likely make little to no difference so just enjoy the game.
sorry i didnt understand what you mean, nothing shows up on the search bar when i have got my results.

There's an extremely minute possibility that someone else using cpu benchmark has the exact same setup as you. So what they do is comparisons per item, based on that item. You are hitting 61% with hyperx 2133 because it's balanced against other hyperx 2133, which has different subtimings or other software using it etc, so you are better off than 61% of them. When using it set to 2400, you are judged against other 2400 users, whom probably have adjusted timings tighter or overclocked their pc or streamlined it in other fashion, so you are at 45% better than the worst.

It's not a reflection of your performance, but a reflection of your performance vrs others out there with 2400MHz ddr3 ram.

Use either profile, doesn't really matter to Intel, anything above 1600 is beyond stock memory controller speeds, so it's only real advantage will be in very few games or apps that can actually benefit from the faster ram. And I do mean very few.

With Intels, the balance of speed vs timings is more important than speeds alone. 2133 cl9 is faster than 2400 cl11. Picture it as 2133 being the speed your legs are moving, but CL being the amount of strides to cover the distance. 9 long strides at 2133 takes less time than someone moving their feet at 2400 taking 11 shorter strides. The first running at a lope, the second shuffling like a geisha. The total distance being the same.

Games use small files, as do most things, the code description of a gun type object is tiny, so they zip right through the ram quickly and don't take much effort to do so. It's with the extra large files like photoshop and video editing etc use where those huge files have to move through the ram at the same speed as the small files that ram speeds can matter.

It's all about how fast you can get the data in the door, across the floor and out the other door. Doing that with a bus load of little kids in a steady stream is easy. Trying to do it with the same amount of 6'6" 450lb men is a whole different ballgame.
many thanks for that, so many good answers, i can only give out 1 trophy :(
 

froggy8

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ASK THE COMMUNITY