ZaReason Rolls Out First Linux Ultrabook

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crabdog

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Problem is that all of these linux distros even in the latest LTS versions are still riddled with bugs and errors. Ubuntu is the most reliable of them all but you have to take on Unity along with it.
 

master_chen

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[citation][nom]crabdog[/nom]Problem is that all of these linux distros even in the latest LTS versions are still riddled with bugs and errors. Ubuntu is the most reliable of them.[/citation]

Just say that you can't into Archie. >:3
 

manicmike

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You aren't paying for Linux, per se, but rather the effort of having someone else install it for you. Just like if you have Geek Squad install Windows for you, you could do it yourself, but you're paying someone else to do it instead.
 

volvavite

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[citation][nom]crabdog[/nom]Problem is that all of these linux distros even in the latest LTS versions are still riddled with bugs and errors.[/citation]
If you see a bug, report it, and help the community on solving it. That being said, Ubuntu 12.04.1 LTS is rock solid, at least on my experience.
[citation][nom]crabdog[/nom]Ubuntu is the most reliable of them all but you have to take on Unity along with it.[/citation]
Unity is great, IMO, but you can always try Linux Mint, or Xubuntu, for example. They all benefit of the reliability of Ubuntu, and Xubuntu is an official derivative that is an LTS for 12.04 as well.
I use Xubuntu 12.04 on my eeePC and it is fast and awesome.
 

myromance123

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Once I start working, I really hope to buy one of ZaReason's or System76's computers.
Just to make it clear, when my local Ubuntu team used to sell Ubuntu, I purchased Ubuntu discs. Why? Because it's worth it.

I feel sad that Tom's started the article with:
ZaReason's UltraLap is a reminder that even Linux will not bring down the price of still-expensive Ultrabooks to a more affordable level.

I guess the writer's over at Tom's don't favor Linux much. Thanks for updating me on ZaReason's new machine though.
 
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The big advantage of buying from ZaReason is that you don't have to guess if there will be issues using all of the hardware under Linux. They designed each one with that goal in mind and do thorough testing before they start selling them.
 

baconeater

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Call me crazy, but get a $799 HP or Asus ultrabook and put FREE linux on it. I think the mainstream companies have the power of economies of scale to have lower ultrabook prices.
 

warbler boy

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I'm running Ubuntu on a cheap Toshiba Portege Z830 ultrabook and it works great. Even keyboard backlighting works and Unity is sweet.
 
The main pricing issue with Ultrabooks is the expensive Intel processor with wimpy Intel graphics! Give me a slightly bulkier AMD system with an A4 or A6 CPU with several times the graphics speed for hundreds of dollars less any day. . .
 

matt_b

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[citation][nom]master_chen[/nom]Linux is free.By buying a laptop with pre-installed Linux, you pay for Linux.[/citation]
Exactly. I have contacted Dell in the past about the pricing issue between Windows and Linux being the same. Their CS person told me that it is in fact much cheaper to produce the Linux computer OS cost wise. The extra cost is due to them having to pull a Windows computer off of the assembly line and install the different OS - hence the extra cost: labor. Unless there is some first-rate support for from these guys, I prefer doing the same as master_chen and pocket the difference myself.
 
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There should be an option to buy with 'no operating system' so you can install it yourself. Thus no additional charge for advanced users.
 

aicom

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[citation][nom]linux4life[/nom]There should be an option to buy with 'no operating system' so you can install it yourself. Thus no additional charge for advanced users.[/citation]

The issue is the OEMs actually get paid to put bloatware on systems. That's why Windows PCs can be sold so cheap (at or slightly below BOM).
 
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I'd just like to interject for a moment. What you’re referring to as Linux, is in fact, GNU/Linux, or as I’ve recently taken to calling it, GNU plus Linux. Linux is not an operating system unto itself, but rather another free component of a fully functioning GNU system made useful by the GNU corelibs, shell utilities and vital system components comprising a full OS as defined by POSIX.

Many computer users run a modified version of the GNU system every day, without realizing it. Through a peculiar turn of events, the version of GNU which is widely used today is often called “Linux”, and many of its users are not aware that it is basically the GNU system, developed by the GNU Project. There really is a Linux, and these people are using it, but it is just a part of the system they use.

Linux is the kernel: the program in the system that allocates the machine’s resources to the other programs that you run. The kernel is an essential part of an operating system, but useless by itself; it can only function in the context of a complete operating system. Linux is normally used in combination with the GNU operating system: the whole system is basically GNU with Linux added, or GNU/Linux. All the so-called “Linux” distributions are really distributions of GNU/Linux.
 

aicom

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[citation][nom]stalledman[/nom]I'd just like to interject for a moment. What you’re referring to as Linux, is in fact, GNU/Linux, or as I’ve recently taken to calling it, GNU plus Linux. Linux is not an operating system unto itself, but rather another free component of a fully functioning GNU system made useful by the GNU corelibs, shell utilities and vital system components comprising a full OS as defined by POSIX.Many computer users run a modified version of the GNU system every day, without realizing it. Through a peculiar turn of events, the version of GNU which is widely used today is often called “Linux”, and many of its users are not aware that it is basically the GNU system, developed by the GNU Project. There really is a Linux, and these people are using it, but it is just a part of the system they use.Linux is the kernel: the program in the system that allocates the machine’s resources to the other programs that you run. The kernel is an essential part of an operating system, but useless by itself; it can only function in the context of a complete operating system. Linux is normally used in combination with the GNU operating system: the whole system is basically GNU with Linux added, or GNU/Linux. All the so-called “Linux” distributions are really distributions of GNU/Linux.[/citation]

Just take mentioning Linux positively as a win. No use trolling and reducing your
 

cookoy

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i'm using Ubuntu 12.04 LTS on a cheap laptop. It just works. And Unity is fine too. You can install a lot of apps but some apps are really crappy. I just uninstall them and look for other alternatives. Not Ubuntu's or Linux's fault but sloppy work from independent developers.
 

mattw0308

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[citation][nom]halcyon[/nom]I have 12.04 LTS in a VM, it works fine but is saddled with Unity. No thanks.[/citation]

The desktop is just another program that can be (un)installed and selected at login time. I have been using the Cinnamon desktop for Ubuntu 12.04 and it's nice and snappy without all the weirdness of Unity. I do have to point out that Unity represents a significant effort to modernize the desktop and has some pretty useful tools once you get used to them.
 

crabdog

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Wow, you don't need to say much to get slammed in the comments here. There must be more Linux fanbois than I had imagined.
That being said, I've had VoyagerOS running on my DELL N5110 for the last 6 months and it's been brilliant. It's based on Xubuntu 12.04 and is rock solid. I've tried pretty much every single major distro released in the last 6 months - I currently have 20 distros installed in my VMWare workstation covering all DE's and flavors of Linux but I'm just being honest when I say that there are still a lot of problems with most of them, including the big name releases.
Things are looking up though with Ubuntu (and Linux in general) gaining popularity, the rumored addition of Steam for Linux and possibly new proprietry drivers from Nvidia which will finally address the Optimus problem, even though Bumblebee has been working very well for me already.
 
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