May 21, 2021
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Mobo
Asus Tuf gaming 570x-pro (wifi)
CPU Zen 3 5600x cooled with an galahad 360 aio
GPU RX 6800 Asus Tuf
Ram GSkill TridentZ neo 3600 F4-3600c16d-16gtznc 32gbs
Storage 2X NVMe WD 850 1TB each
Case Phanteks P500A
PSU Seasonice Prime PX0-850 80+platinum.

Little about me. I've been playing on a gaming laptop for the past 8 to 10 years haswell (i7 and gtx 970) before then I had a desktop with an OC AMD black edition CPU and I think a 500 series GPU. Awhile ago for me.
So with that out of the way here's the meat and potatoes of the post. I'm overclocking my 5600x and this is what I've got so far. 1.375v @4.75 all core OC @ 72c . My cinebench scores stock with multi 10695 single 1512 after OC multi 12014 and single of 1568. To get 4.80Ghz stable I have to volt all the way to 1.45v and only got 200 more on my multi score (Didn't do a single). My friend said wow that's kinda hot @72c but said that might be fine for AMD since he OC his i9 9900k to 5.0Ghz all core @ 50c, I do know that anything around 90 is bad. I'm looking for opinions, tips/tricks, other people experience and, is it worth it (to you if you where in my shoes).

Thanks
 
Worth it for gaming? Absolutely not.
Worth it for getting the extra 200 points? Only you can decide that.

I wouldn't want my 5600x to get to (or above) 90C in any scenario. Although, 90C is considered high but okay for the 5600x.
 
May 21, 2021
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Worth it for gaming? Absolutely not.
Worth it for getting the extra 200 points? Only you can decide that.

I wouldn't want my 5600x to get to (or above) 90C in any scenario. Although, 90C is considered high but okay for the 5600x.
I did forget to mention something. When I got my 72c it was after adjusting the fan curve before I got 74c. When I did my 4.8 OC it was before that adjustment and I got 80c.
 

DSzymborski

Polypheme
Moderator
72 isn't really a problem. These are hot chips. I've got a 360 AIO, a total of 8 fans, and my office is about 18C, and my 5900X runs a bit hotter than my old 8700K. Chips these days are designed to give themselves de facto overclocks as long as the cooling handles it.
 
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Personally, I would just enable PBO, and leave it alone. In lighter threaded applications, some of your cores can boost higher, than an all core overclock will get you.
I did enable PBO and noticed and got a cinebench score around 11800. I don't remember the exact number. I wanted to see if I could get higher numbers than that. I did but not by much.
 
.... I wanted to see if I could get higher numbers than that. I did but not by much.
Try PBO with curve optimizer, I understand it can return better results.

Maybe just experimenting is going to be OK but 1.45V is really high for a fixed, 24/7, overclock even if you are managing to keep temps in check. Being a fixed overclock the CPU is seeing that voltage 100% of the time, never resting. That's the formula for degradation, when the CPU goes unstable on you in a few months and starts random crashes in mid-game. When you go back to stock, maybe with PBO, it may return to stability but it won't return BM's anywhere close to what it can now since it runs hotter so the algorithm pulls clocks further.
 
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May 21, 2021
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Personally, I would just enable PBO, and leave it alone. In lighter threaded applications, some of your cores can boost higher, than an all core overclock will get you.
I've been playing with PBO and I feel like I'm probably doing it wrong. Granted and single or applications I do get higher boosts but my score is not that further up. My multi-thread performance is nowhere near my static clock. If you're interested I could share some of my settings. But just turning on PBO and not adjusting any of the settings definitely netted me lower scores.
 
I've been playing with PBO and I feel like I'm probably doing it wrong.
...
You might not be doing it wrong so much as looking at it wrong.

The benefit comes mostly from greater assurance of processor longevity by leaving the boosting algorithm in control of the process. With Ryzen 5000 the process node has matured and the algorithm is tweaked enough that it's very close to all-core results even under extreme heavy loads.You can definitely push voltage high enough, and with good enough cooling collect benches that beat even a well tuned PBO (no mystery, that's what LN2 overclocking is all about) but you're dooming your CPU to an early grave if you want to drive it 24/7 that way.

So if leaving it stock with PBO is getting you cinebench scores as close as they do, is it really worth it?
 
May 21, 2021
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You might not be doing it wrong so much as looking at it wrong.

The benefit comes mostly from greater assurance of processor longevity by leaving the boosting algorithm in control of the process. With Ryzen 5000 the process node has matured and the algorithm is tweaked enough that it's very close to all-core results even under extreme heavy loads.You can definitely push voltage high enough, and with good enough cooling collect benches that beat even a well tuned PBO (no mystery, that's what LN2 overclocking is all about) but you're dooming your CPU to an early grave if you want to drive it 24/7 that way.

So if leaving it stock with PBO is getting you cinebench scores as close as they do, is it really worth it?
Stock my cinebench is 10,835, with my static overclock I get 12, 108. I've always tried to get the most juice I can out of my processor. I have no plans on farming coin but playing games. So I won't be pushing it 24/7. Didn't realize these chips were so fragile. Of overclocked and the chips in the past I've had them last for years. But these are different chips, and it looks like from some responses they might be getting this boost treatment due to the fact that they can't handle much. But playing with PBO got me 11, 800
 
I do not have a 5600, but my 3600 on a prime X570-P will do 4.4 all core boost @1.28v.
I turned off PBO, Asus optimizer etc....
Set CPU multi to 44
Set voltage to 1.28
Set line load calibration to a middle range.
Exit and Save.
In windows use Ryzen balanced plan.

You will need to play around with the voltage to see what your chip will handle and still be stable.
Some are reporting 1.25v stability.
The above gets me 4.4 boost on heavy loads and gaming.
Feeding a video card for folding causes one core to boost to 4.4 and the others bounce around from 300mhz to 900mhz with short burst up occasionally.
Then it could be that you got unlucky in the silicone lottery and you need that much voltage for all cores to be stable@ that speed.
But a 1.45v overclock will shorten your chips life dramatically.
 
May 21, 2021
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I do not have a 5600, but my 3600 on a prime X570-P will do 4.4 all core boost @1.28v.
I turned off PBO, Asus optimizer etc....
Set CPU multi to 44
Set voltage to 1.28
Set line load calibration to a middle range.
Exit and Save.
In windows use Ryzen balanced plan.

You will need to play around with the voltage to see what your chip will handle and still be stable.
Some are reporting 1.25v stability.
The above gets me 4.4 boost on heavy loads and gaming.
Feeding a video card for folding causes one core to boost to 4.4 and the others bounce around from 300mhz to 900mhz with short burst up occasionally.
Then it could be that you got unlucky in the silicone lottery and you need that much voltage for all cores to be stable@ that speed.
But a 1.45v overclock will shorten your chips life dramatically.
Right now I've got a static overclock of 4.75ghz @ 1.375v after playing with the fan curve she bumps between 71 and 72 c under full load. That's me playing with the things to get my static overclock. I've been doing a lot of playing with PBO having a really hard time with it. I make changes but it seems like it won't boost over 4.599
 
May 21, 2021
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I do not have a 5600, but my 3600 on a prime X570-P will do 4.4 all core boost @1.28v.
I turned off PBO, Asus optimizer etc....
Set CPU multi to 44
Set voltage to 1.28
Set line load calibration to a middle range.
Exit and Save.
In windows use Ryzen balanced plan.

You will need to play around with the voltage to see what your chip will handle and still be stable.
Some are reporting 1.25v stability.
The above gets me 4.4 boost on heavy loads and gaming.
Feeding a video card for folding causes one core to boost to 4.4 and the others bounce around from 300mhz to 900mhz with short burst up occasionally.
Then it could be that you got unlucky in the silicone lottery and you need that much voltage for all cores to be stable@ that speed.
But a 1.45v overclock will shorten your chips life dramatically.
No I have a 5600x, cpuz told me so. However I found out what was going on. My motherboard has the same PBO settings into locations one is under AI tweaking and the other is under advanced. The only difference is that the one under advanced also has curve optimizer options. My point is if they both don't match in both categories I only boost to 4.4. opposed to my settings in a little bit but I'm getting multi-core boosting to 4.7 and single core boosting to 4.8 but I'm going to try to push the single core boosting a bit further.

I was able to get my static overclock to 4.75 GHz at 1.375v with thermals of 72c
 

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