Build Advice 1000$ motherboard, cpu, ram, pc case, power supply?

Mar 9, 2020
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I already have a graphic card NVIDIA GEFORCE GTX 1060 3GB and 1 TB SSD, i want to buy a new tower, pc case, cpu, motherboard, ram, powersupply. I use photoshop and illustrator a lot, i want to play new pc games decently, and i want to stream a little, a pc that will run decently without problems 5-6 years, any help? Thanks!
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($274.49 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Thermalright MACHO Rev.C 84.97 CFM CPU Cooler ($54.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: MSI B450 Gaming Plus MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard ($126.81 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL16 Memory ($149.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Define S2 ATX Mid Tower Case ($148.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: EVGA 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($121.38 @ Amazon)
Total: $876.65
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-30 17:36 EDT-0400
 
Mar 9, 2020
18
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PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($274.49 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Thermalright MACHO Rev.C 84.97 CFM CPU Cooler ($54.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: MSI B450 Gaming Plus MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard ($126.81 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL16 Memory ($149.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Define S2 ATX Mid Tower Case ($148.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: EVGA 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($121.38 @ Amazon)
Total: $876.65
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-30 17:36 EDT-0400
This case is a little big, and its always good to save some money, would you change it with something else in lower price?
 

helper800

Distinguished
This case is a little big, and its always good to save some money, would you change it with something else in lower price?
I believe something like this would serve you better for much longer.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 9 3900X 3.8 GHz 12-Core Processor ($418.54 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Thermalright Macho X2 Limited Edition CPU Cooler ($55.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus TUF GAMING X570-PLUS (WI-FI) ATX AM4 Motherboard ($189.99 @ Best Buy)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL16 Memory ($149.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master MasterBox NR600 (w/o ODD) ATX Mid Tower Case ($77.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair RM (2019) 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($144.99 @ Best Buy)
Total: $1037.48
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-31 01:11 EDT-0400


*** Edited to swap out to a different case and a PSU that does not have any issues.
 
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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I don't like that case selection. It does poorly in thermal testing at many review sites.

Also, that Seasonic Focus unit is known to be problematic, unlike some of the newer Focus Plus units that have addressed the issues that those original Focus units had. I'd avoid those like the plague when there are other units still available, even now, that don't have similar issues, unless you live in a region where it's the only decent thing available to you. I'd rather have an EVGA GQ, which itself is not one of the best units out there but IS one of the best units you can actually GET your hands on right now, than one of the original Focus units.

And there is absolutely ZERO chance that a 3900x is a necessary choice for a build of this type. Even the 3700x is probably overkill, but I selected it in order to offer a longer period of relevance since the OP is looking to get 5-6 years out of it. The fact is that most Adobe applications primarily prefer to see strong single core performance and do not typically take great advantage of many cores or threads. Multitasking however, will benefit from it. So if you're running Photoshop or Illustrator (And especially if you run both simultaneously), plus some browser tabs, an office document, whatever, you can definitely see some gains from those cores then but you'd never see an advantage on this type of system from the extra you'd spend on the 3900x which is a rather extreme option for anybody not running highly optimized professional applications designed to leverage those cores and threads or some serious multitasking and maybe throw some VMs in there as well.

IN short, it's WAY overkill, and not necessary at all. The 3700x is already overkill, but not to the same degree. In truth, the 3600 or 3600x would probably do the job just fine, but the 3700x is like having chosen an i7-4790k rather than an i5-4690k, and still being able to just get by with it the last two years or so, and maybe still today, rather than with the i5 you'd definitely be looking for a platform upgrade by now. Much the same between those.

The X570 motherboard, is a complete waste because there is absolutely no PCIe 4.0 devices being used on this system. It's like taking two twenty dollar bills and lighting them on fire. Maybe three.

If you don't like the Define S2, which is a fantastic case and give you plenty of room to work in, expansion and upgrades, then you might want to look at the Meshify C or drop down to something like the Focus G.

The Phanteks Enthoo Pro M is also a very good choice.

You don't want to drop down to a micro ATX sized case, unless you fully intend to specifically target a micro ATX motherboard and graphics card, and understand that you will not only have much less room to work with when installing components but also you will be highly limited in what CPU coolers, graphics cards and other hardware you can install now or later. Even more so for mini ITX.

Mid tower ATX, like the Define S2, Define R6, the somewhat smaller Meshify C or the even smaller mid tower Focus G, are much better suited for these kinds of builds. If you have size constraints because of WHERE you will have the system, then you might want to think about whether that is even a good spot for it to be living. Enclosed cabinets are a poor choice of location for a desktop PC even though they are technically designed to house them Those became popular, and still are to some degree, for much lower capability systems, not for enthusiast and performance type machines that need fresh, ambient air in quantity to see the longest lifespan and highest level of performance.

If there are other size considerations as to why you need something smaller, please feel free to share them so we can discuss it. Hard to make recommendations when lacking the facts and requirements of the equation.
 
Reactions: JimFit
PCPartPicker Part List: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/NpMNHB

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($274.49 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: ARCTIC Freezer 34 eSports DUO CPU Cooler ($57.97 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard ($114.99 @ Best Buy)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL16 Memory ($149.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Focus G ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.19 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: be quiet! Straight Power 11 550 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($119.90 @ B&H)
Total: $766.53
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-30 23:37 EDT-0400

Adding a few things from @Darkbreeze's suggestion:
  1. I have worked with Thermalright's Macho series before. It was not the most pleasant experience. It's huge, so it's hard to get into the case, and you might have some fan clearance issues. Not recommended for most builders when you have the Freezer 34 that performs about the same but won't drive you nuts.
  2. The Tomahawk MAX has better VRM and is cheaper
  3. Since you like small cases, this one might suit better. The H510 isn't optimized for good airflow, so there's that.
  4. The BQ! Is a better PSU than the one suggested earlier. It passes Aris' testing so it's all good.
 
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Reactions: JimFit

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
That Tomahawk is not available, even though it shows as available through Best Buy. It's not. I've already had five members tell me they've tried to order it online AND in the stores in person, and it is back ordered, just like it is everywhere. Which is why I have the Gaming Plus, which is less expensive usually (Although not right now because of the lack of supply versus high demand) but has the exact same VRM configuration as the Tomahawk and Pro Carbon, selected. Again, SAME VRM, exactly, all three boards, Gaming Plus, Tomahawk (And Max) and Pro Carbon. And usually the Gaming plus is about ten bucks cheaper, except that, being one of the only B450 boards currently even available, that has R3000 support out of the box AND BIOS flashback, it's gone up in price because nothing else is available unless you want to pay way more for a relatively useless X570 board.

Also, no way the Freezer 34 eSports performs anywhere near the Macho rev.C. No, uh uh. Especially when the Macho rev.B performs within about .25°C of the Noctua NH-D14/D15, which we already know is the best overall air cooler out there. If you're trying to tell me that the little 120mm fan cooler can compete with these big boys, I'm going to tell you in no uncertain terms where you can take that nonsense. Sorry, but while I agree that that cooler is a good option for smaller enclosures, there's no way it's competitive with these bigger coolers that rival most 240mm AIO's.

As seen here, it performs nearly the exact same under full load OC conditions as the NH-D15, but is half the cost.

https://www.techpowerup.com/review/thermalright-macho-revb/6.html

Also, if you look at the noise levels, the Macho rev.B (And therefore, the rev.C, which is the same cooler with only minor changes) is about 6db quieter at max fans than the 212 EVO.

https://www.techpowerup.com/review/thermalright-macho-revb/7.html

While the eSports 34 duo has the SAME noise levels at max fans as the 212 EVO.

https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/arctic-freezer-34-esports-duo-cooler,6352-2.html

Now that is good, considering it is a dual fan design and has the same noise levels as the single fan 212 EVO, but that's not saying much because the 212 EVO is a noisy sumbatch under full load conditions. 6db is a major difference.

Not sure where you get the idea that the Straight power 11 "passes testing", but there are a bunch of rather significant problems with that unit as seen here:

  • Low overall performance difference with the previous model
  • The protection features are not configured correctly
  • No bypass relay in the inrush current protection circuit
  • High Vampire Power
  • Efficiency at 5VSB is much lower compared to the previous model
  • Lower than 70% efficiency with 2% load
  • Not compatible with the alternative sleep mode
https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/be-quiet-straight-power-11-550w-platinum

Honestly, it's not the worst unit out there or even necessarily all THAT bad, but it's definitely not great.

The GQ I recommended is an excellent unit overall. It has none of the shortcomings seen with the Straight power 11. True, the GQ models are known for slightly higher fan noise levels, but considering this unit is about 200w more than that GTX 1060 is ever going to pull, he's never going to see a peak anywhere near capacity anyhow, and even with a higher draw graphics card the difference isn't that dramatic except on the test bench with nothing else going on. For right now, for somebody who can't wait for better units to get back into stock and prices to come down, it's a very good option.




 

helper800

Distinguished
I don't like that case selection. It does poorly in thermal testing at many review sites.

Also, that Seasonic Focus unit is known to be problematic, unlike some of the newer Focus Plus units that have addressed the issues that those original Focus units had. I'd avoid those like the plague when there are other units still available, even now, that don't have similar issues, unless you live in a region where it's the only decent thing available to you. I'd rather have an EVGA GQ, which itself is not one of the best units out there but IS one of the best units you can actually GET your hands on right now, than one of the original Focus units.

And there is absolutely ZERO chance that a 3900x is a necessary choice for a build of this type. Even the 3700x is probably overkill, but I selected it in order to offer a longer period of relevance since the OP is looking to get 5-6 years out of it. The fact is that most Adobe applications primarily prefer to see strong single core performance and do not typically take great advantage of many cores or threads. Multitasking however, will benefit from it. So if you're running Photoshop or Illustrator (And especially if you run both simultaneously), plus some browser tabs, an office document, whatever, you can definitely see some gains from those cores then but you'd never see an advantage on this type of system from the extra you'd spend on the 3900x which is a rather extreme option for anybody not running highly optimized professional applications designed to leverage those cores and threads or some serious multitasking and maybe throw some VMs in there as well.

IN short, it's WAY overkill, and not necessary at all. The 3700x is already overkill, but not to the same degree. In truth, the 3600 or 3600x would probably do the job just fine, but the 3700x is like having chosen an i7-4790k rather than an i5-4690k, and still being able to just get by with it the last two years or so, and maybe still today, rather than with the i5 you'd definitely be looking for a platform upgrade by now. Much the same between those.

The X570 motherboard, is a complete waste because there is absolutely no PCIe 4.0 devices being used on this system. It's like taking two twenty dollar bills and lighting them on fire. Maybe three.

If you don't like the Define S2, which is a fantastic case and give you plenty of room to work in, expansion and upgrades, then you might want to look at the Meshify C or drop down to something like the Focus G.

The Phanteks Enthoo Pro M is also a very good choice.

You don't want to drop down to a micro ATX sized case, unless you fully intend to specifically target a micro ATX motherboard and graphics card, and understand that you will not only have much less room to work with when installing components but also you will be highly limited in what CPU coolers, graphics cards and other hardware you can install now or later. Even more so for mini ITX.

Mid tower ATX, like the Define S2, Define R6, the somewhat smaller Meshify C or the even smaller mid tower Focus G, are much better suited for these kinds of builds. If you have size constraints because of WHERE you will have the system, then you might want to think about whether that is even a good spot for it to be living. Enclosed cabinets are a poor choice of location for a desktop PC even though they are technically designed to house them Those became popular, and still are to some degree, for much lower capability systems, not for enthusiast and performance type machines that need fresh, ambient air in quantity to see the longest lifespan and highest level of performance.

If there are other size considerations as to why you need something smaller, please feel free to share them so we can discuss it. Hard to make recommendations when lacking the facts and requirements of the equation.
He was specifically saying he wanted to stream games for 5-6 years. This means that something overkill now will age significantly better later on. I was not aware of issues with specific Seasonic PSU's so that probably warrants a change. The temp "issues" with that NZXT case are overblown a bit imo, I picked it because cases are preference and I prefer aesthetic and there are few cases in that price range that look that good to me that also perform good enough. Cases are also largely preference and he could easily find a decent case either way for 70-90 dollars. The x570 motherboard may not have many benefits now with PCIe 4.0, however, he is going to own the computer for 5-6 years and he may add in storage options in the future that can take advantage of this increased bandwidth, and the same goes for upgraded GPU's of the future. The reasoning on the parts for my build aside from the PSU are all completely valid and based on the OP's preferences and are still within his budget.
 
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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I'll give you the PCIe 4.0 being viable as an option for upgrades over the course of 5 years. That could definitely be something of a bonus if he opts for a PCIe 4.0 NVME M.2 drive or graphics card down the road. If he doesn't, then it's still pointless. If he sticks with SATA drives of any type and doesn't upgrade to a graphics card that is an upcoming 4.0 compatible model, then it will have been an unnecessary and unhelpful feature that you paid for. Personally, I'd probably want to have it on any new board I bought, but I would NOT be inclined to purchase an X570 motherboard simply due to the annoyance of the chipset fans and the fact that they are a rushed product that feedback has shown to not be worth the extra investment over the comparable B450 or X470 models.

Still, could go either way on that. Personally, I'd probably recommend WAITING a week or two and looking at the B550 release that is supposed to offer PCIe 4.0 support without the chipset fans and with better VRM configurations across the whole of the product stack.

I really don't think the thermal issues with the H510 are overblown. It has a seriously restricted intake configuration and if aesthetics were all we cared about, we'd all just by Raidmax cases and power supplies. I don't argue against looks also being important, but if the primary functionality of features and cooling are not top notch then it's pointless to pay for or bother with anything more evolved than the Focus G or something similar. Plus, EVERY case on the market, not including a few of the 175+ dollar models (Normal prices, not current ones), is going to seriously be needing at LEAST the addition of one supplementary fan, if not two or three depending on the case model and whether an AIO is going to be used or not. So that is another consideration and expense, for most people. With any of these higher core count CPUs, TERRIFIC cooling should be a HIGH priority if you want ANY chance of them being capable of maintaining their boost profiles at an acceptable level.
 
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helper800

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I'll give you the PCIe 4.0 being viable as an option for upgrades over the course of 5 years. That could definitely be something of a bonus if he opts for a PCIe 4.0 NVME M.2 drive or graphics card down the road. If he doesn't, then it's still pointless. If he sticks with SATA drives of any type and doesn't upgrade to a graphics card that is an upcoming 4.0 compatible model, then it will have been an unnecessary and unhelpful feature that you paid for. Personally, I'd probably want to have it on any new board I bought, but I would NOT be inclined to purchase an X570 motherboard simply due to the annoyance of the chipset fans and the fact that they are a rushed product that feedback has shown to not be worth the extra investment over the comparable B450 or X470 models.

Still, could go either way on that. Personally, I'd probably recommend WAITING a week or two and looking at the B550 release that is supposed to offer PCIe 4.0 support without the chipset fans and with better VRM configurations across the whole of the product stack.

I really don't think the thermal issues with the H510 are overblown. It has a seriously restricted intake configuration and if aesthetics were all we cared about, we'd all just by Raidmax cases and power supplies. I don't argue against looks also being important, but if the primary functionality of features and cooling are not top notch then it's pointless to pay for or bother with anything more evolved than the Focus G or something similar. Plus, EVERY case on the market, not including a few of the 175+ dollar models (Normal prices, not current ones), is going to seriously be needing at LEAST the addition of one supplementary fan, if not two or three depending on the case model and whether an AIO is going to be used or not. So that is another consideration and expense, for most people. With any of these higher core count CPUs, TERRIFIC cooling should be a HIGH priority if you want ANY chance of them being capable of maintaining their boost profiles at an acceptable level.
I have a 3900x and it regularly got to the 4.6 boost on 2 cores and 4.55 on 4 with the stock cooler, which also kept it below 75 for about 8 minutes of stress testing with cpu-z. I am not going to argue that the NZXT case has amazing airflow, but to call it anything less than adequate is a misrepresentation. I am also not going to get into an argument to justify why I value aesthetics with cases more than you do as it would be pointless which is why I was saying that it was my opinion. I have an x570 motherboard and have no issue with the chipset fan making noise even at 2670 rpm.
 
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OK, that's a lot of things to talk about. For the motherboard, I agree. I didn't check that deeply, my mistake. The Gaming Plus is the best that @JimFit can get.

But the Gaming Plus, Tomahawk, and Pro Carbon does not have the same VRMs. At least the Gaming Plus and the Tomahawk does have the same VRM configuration, but the latter has a beefier heatsink. You can even judge by simply looking at it. The Pro Carbon, on the other hand, has an entirely different VRM configuration. Waiting for B550 boards can also be an option, which means that you would also get access to Comet Lake and Ryzen XT.

I might have held some grudge towards Thermalright Macho coolers, but then again it was one of the most annoying cooler that I have dealt with. Installation was a pain. It was huge, the fan mounts/clipping system is dumb, and getting it on to the case was just a plain nightmare. I might be emotional when I said "about the same", so probably was not backed up by any kind of data. I'll try not to say anything like that again.

But I will still hold my stance to always beware of the difficulties that you are going to face when installing this big boy cooler.

Now for EVGA GQ. I feel that @Darkbreeze is wrong here. It does not have "protection features are not configured correctly" as Aris suggested. Go to page 3 and read all the readings. He was referring that it was not correctly configured relative to what is promised, NOT that it is broken or anything. All the rails are still within specs, and they all work as they intended to. Vampire power is inconsistent within Aris' reviews, sometimes he'd say it's a problem and sometimes not even when they have the same value. Interestingly, in EVGA GQ's (750 W) case, both the 115V and the 230V vampire powers are higher than the BeQuiet SP, and Aris did not even mention it.

Meanwhile, the BQ SP is one of the cheapest Platinum units out there, with good performance all-around and actually one of the quietest PSUs ever built. EVGA GQ, on the other hand failed on Aris' ripple and transience tests. It is also extremely noisy and with EVGA's tendency to screw up protection configs on <2018 units, it could be safe to assume that the GQ has broken protections as well as it cannot be proven otherwise.

This is why you don't only read the first page of Aris reviews. There's more to them than just page 1.

However, the problem is that B&H does not seem to have it in stock yet. It's about time that I check PCPartPicker's stock seriously, then. Here's a good one that's actually in stock (only 2 left!):

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07Z8J1973
 
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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Heatsink is not "VRMs". Heatsink is heatsink. The actual voltage regulation module components are 100% identical. The Tomahawk has been tested with the 3950x, with no problems, which means the Gaming plus could run that CPU with no problems, which definitely means it can run the 3700x, 3800x or 3900x with no problems.

The Pro carbon does NOT have a different VRM configuration. It is EXACTLY the same.

Multiple tier lists and VRM spreadsheets, as well as reviews, show the Gaming Plus, Tomahawk and Gaming Pro carbon as well as the B450-A Pro, having the same 4+2 RT8894A CPU VCC controller, same highside mosfet 2x 4C029N and lowside mosfet 2x 4C024N. They are all the same from what I've seen and from what every experienced Ryzen enthusiast I've talked with has said. If you know something different, let's see the evidence because there is no sense in not knowing if it's true.

All the big coolers are a PITA to install. There's just no getting around that because, well, they're BIG. But once installed they are dynamic performers. Thermalright and Noctua are top shelf, no question. There are no air cooler manufacturers that can compete on the same level for both overall cooling AND sound levels, as these two. There just aren't. Reviews bear this out year after year after year, model after model after model.

We're not talking about the 750w GQ, which is what you referenced, and we KNOW that from one model to the next, even within the same series, there can be and are major differences. Aris has not done a review of the 650w model, only the 750w model, so we can't realistically apply that review to the whole series. It just doesn't work that way. Yes they are usually somewhat similar but they are almost never the same. Especially with EVGA's series. Take the B3 models for example. Three of the models in that series blew up in Aris testing and another was outstanding. We've seen Seasonic use COMPLETELY different platforms within the same series, and others have done so as well.

In fact, OW specifically calls out the fact that the 850w platform and the 650w platform are different, which MOST LIKELY means the 750w platform is different as well. Generally, 550-650w share one platform while 750-850w models share a different one, for most series out there and it's pretty common for most manufacturers.

This unit is acceptable in all areas of Oklahoma wolf's testing including full power at 50°C and considering what's out there right now, that's good enough for any user, especially when they don't have much choice. If you read closely through his review, it's actually a pretty damn good unit compared to a lot of what's out there. Again, the unit you recommended is fine. It's not garbage either, as I said.

Also, I don't need you to tell me how to read reviews. I've been reading reviews since probably before you even knew what a power supply was. That is to say, I'm old, and have been doing this a rather long time, so yeah, I fully get it that reading the entire review is important beyond just the bullet points.

Either of these units, especially in the current market conditions, is a good enough choice and better than what 75% of users out there have in their systems, so really either of them "works" for me.
 
Reactions: JimFit
Heatsink is not "VRMs". Heatsink is heatsink. The actual voltage regulation module components are 100% identical.
I've never said otherwise. The wording might not be precise, but I clarified it on the next post. I know, I have a habit of this. I was just saying that the Tomahawk has "better VRM" that referred to thermally better VRM as as result of the beefier heatsink.

The Pro carbon does NOT have a different VRM configuration. It is EXACTLY the same.
It does have the same VCore VRM controller and MOSFETs. The count for the MOSFETs, chokes and caps are, however, different. That is not the same in my books.

We're not talking about the 750w GQ, which is what you referenced, and we KNOW that from one model to the next, even within the same series, there can be and are major differences

Generally, 550-650w share one platform while 750-850w models share a different one, for most series out there and it's pretty common for most manufacturers.
Actually, not this case. The 650 and the 750 shares the same FSP ACRF-based design. Caps, chokes, and HS might be different as they depend on what is available at their particular manufacturing date. Orion PSU DB seems to agree as well.

https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/evga-gq-series-750w-psu,4396-3.html

This unit is acceptable in all areas of Oklahoma wolf's testing including full power at 50°C and considering what's out there right now, that's good enough for any user, especially when they don't have much choice. If you read closely through his review, it's actually a pretty damn good unit compared to a lot of what's out there. Again, the unit you recommended is fine. It's not garbage either, as I said.

Also, I don't need you to tell me how to read reviews. I've been reading reviews since probably before you even knew what a power supply was. That is to say, I'm old, and have been doing this a rather long time, so yeah, I fully get it that reading the entire review is important beyond just the bullet points.

Either of these units, especially in the current market conditions, is a good enough choice and better than what 75% of users out there have in their systems, so really either of them "works" for me.
Good enough, but not better than the BQ. That was the whole point of my post! Ripple data might not be as bad, it's still worse than the BQ. Oklahoma didn't test its short-period transience and protection features either, so Aris's GQ 750 is the best info we have to date.

And sorry, I didn't mean to be rude or disrespect the elders, but I just want to tell you something worth telling. Aris reviews are full of data that you really have to read each page carefully. Most of us don't have the time for that. I am reading a lot of them because currently I have completely nothing else to do.

You probably have been reading reviews not just before I knew about PSUs. You probably have been reading reviews before I was born 🤣.

UPDATE: B450 Gaming Plus MAX is out of stock as well. The B450A-PRO seems to be the only choice now, with a disgusting price of $220. Might as well look at some X570s to ensure compatibility then.
 
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I appreciate the help and i learned a lot of stuff from this discussion (although many of the things you are discussing are difficult for me to follow because i don't know much about computers and english is not my first language.)

@Darkbreeze The reason i want a smaller case is because of the dust it collects and because i don't know if i can use all this space. I have my case on the floor, my previous case was a Thermaltake Soprano.

From your list the only one that is not available in my country is EVGA 650 GQ v2,,they bought them all.
Can you suggest another one?

Considering the GPU, i think its better to have an option to upgrate to a GPU PCIe 4.0 later, i don't know when i will buy a new GPU, maybe 1-2 years from now?

Is it a waste of money to buy a better CPU ? Is AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor more than enough for my needs?


I thank you all for replying to my thread, i hope this discussion helped someone that is looking to buy a new pc.
 
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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Ok, so let's simplify things because it does no good to look at hardware availability for a country that you are not in. What ACTUAL country are you in and if there are specific online retailers you can or would prefer to purchase from, please provide links to them so we can look at what they offer in order to help you make appropriate selections. It would be much to your advantage to outline hardware that is actually available to you, not to me or the next guy that might be in the UK or Australia. Or Timbuktu.

And don't say "Oh yeah, I'm actually IN Timbuktu" because then I'm going to say forget it, there's no hardware available to you worth using anyhow. LOL. Ok, just kidding.
 
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Ok, so let's simplify things because it does no good to look at hardware availability for a country that you are not in. What ACTUAL country are you in and if there are specific online retailers you can or would prefer to purchase from, please provide links to them so we can look at what they offer in order to help you make appropriate selections. It would be much to your advantage to outline hardware that is actually available to you, not to me or the next guy that might be in the UK or Australia. Or Timbuktu.

And don't say "Oh yeah, I'm actually IN Timbuktu" because then I'm going to say forget it, there's no hardware available to you worth using anyhow. LOL. Ok, just kidding.
Everything on the list is available in the same or lower prices, the only thing that is out of stock is EVGA 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply , can you suggest me another one so i can order the pieces? Thank you very much!

what is available from EVGA here


https://www.bestprice.gr/cat/2608/trofodotika-ypologiston/f/1_2853/evga.html
 
Oh, so you're from Greece? Hmm... Good then. This is what you should do first, tell me where you are from and tell me your favourite local online store for reference, because choosing a PSU is very confusing.

https://www.foxstore.gr/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=3762 -> Cheap unit that will get the job done
https://kavatza.gr/hy-anavathmisi/trofodotika/be-quiet/be-quiet-straight-power-11-550w-platinum-bn305 -> One I suggested earlier

Motherboard:
https://www.foxstore.gr/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=75146
 
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Reactions: JimFit

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yeah, looks like it's all Greek to me. Ba da bing. Ok, done with the lame jokes. For now.

Let's ask an important question though, because I see a lot of users, daily in fact, that buy a power supply based on what they need at that moment but then end up changing graphics cards not long after and discovering that what they have, while fine for the previous configuration is not nearly enough for what they are upgrading to and now they again have to replace the power supply. So, is there any chance you may be upgrading or changing graphics cards to a higher tiered model at ANY point in the next two years?

If so, any idea what you might be targeting as a card model when you do so?
 
Mar 9, 2020
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Oh, so you're from Greece? Hmm... Good then. This is what you should do first, tell me where you are from and tell me your favourite local online store for reference, because choosing a PSU is very confusing.

https://www.foxstore.gr/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=3762 -> Cheap unit that will get the job done
https://kavatza.gr/hy-anavathmisi/trofodotika/be-quiet/be-quiet-straight-power-11-550w-platinum-bn305 -> One I suggested earlier

Motherboard:
https://www.foxstore.gr/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=75146
Thank you very much! We use this site www.bestprice.gr its a search engine for prices, it will look for the cheaper price that is available. they have included every store and compare prices daily, sometimes i can get better deals than Amazon!

Yeah, looks like it's all Greek to me. Ba da bing. Ok, done with the lame jokes. For now.

Let's ask an important question though, because I see a lot of users, daily in fact, that buy a power supply based on what they need at that moment but then end up changing graphics cards not long after and discovering that what they have, while fine for the previous configuration is not nearly enough for what they are upgrading to and now they again have to replace the power supply. So, is there any chance you may be upgrading or changing graphics cards to a higher tiered model at ANY point in the next two years?

If so, any idea what you might be targeting as a card model when you do so?
We Greeks say, its all chinese to me! lol! Anyway! Yes probably i will upgrade after 2-3-4 years, the GPU i have i bought last year on Christmas so its very early to replace it and i don't think there are games that demanding right now, also i don't care play games at higher settings. As long as they don't drop bellow 60 fps i am okay!

Do you think that the future of GPU is PCIe 4? Should i buy a motherboard that supports PCIe4 so i can support video cards that will be available after 3 years? If you can't understand what i am asking please tell me to rephrase, thanks!
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Well, the future of any add in PCI devices are going to have to be PCIe 4.0 because that's all that's going to be available before long. Of course, they'll be backwards compatible so that doesn't really matter that much except that as devices themselves, cards, motherboards, CPUs, add support for PCIe 4.0 we will hopefully begin to see some improvements but it feels like it's almost a useless improvement aside from storage devices because most graphics cards don't max out the PCIe 3.0 bus as it is. That will change, slowly, over time.

I don't think right now it matters about that and if you get a motherboard that isn't a PCIe 4.0 card you're not going to really lose anything because newer devices on boards that support it right now don't really show any significant benefit anyhow.

If you don't plan to upgrade the graphics card for maybe as long as 4 years, then there is no point in targeting a higher capacity power supply at this time and I'd agree that any high quality 550w unit is more than enough. A very good 450w unit would even be suitable but given current conditions a 550w is probably a better choice because you are unlikely to find a very good 450w unit at all, much less at a reasonable price.

The link to that Straight power 11 unit on the kavatza website give me a 404 error, so looks like that one is no longer available or something.

This is a better unit than either of those others, immediately available AND less expensive.

https://www.foxstore.gr/index.php?route=product/product&path=1_942_968_471&product_id=18700
 
Reactions: JimFit
Mar 9, 2020
18
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Well, the future of any add in PCI devices are going to have to be PCIe 4.0 because that's all that's going to be available before long. Of course, they'll be backwards compatible so that doesn't really matter that much except that as devices themselves, cards, motherboards, CPUs, add support for PCIe 4.0 we will hopefully begin to see some improvements but it feels like it's almost a useless improvement aside from storage devices because most graphics cards don't max out the PCIe 3.0 bus as it is. That will change, slowly, over time.

I don't think right now it matters about that and if you get a motherboard that isn't a PCIe 4.0 card you're not going to really lose anything because newer devices on boards that support it right now don't really show any significant benefit anyhow.

If you don't plan to upgrade the graphics card for maybe as long as 4 years, then there is no point in targeting a higher capacity power supply at this time and I'd agree that any high quality 550w unit is more than enough. A very good 450w unit would even be suitable but given current conditions a 550w is probably a better choice because you are unlikely to find a very good 450w unit at all, much less at a reasonable price.

The link to that Straight power 11 unit on the kavatza website give me a 404 error, so looks like that one is no longer available or something.

This is a better unit than either of those others, immediately available AND less expensive.

https://www.foxstore.gr/index.php?route=product/product&path=1_942_968_471&product_id=18700
So these?

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($274.49 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Thermalright MACHO Rev.C 84.97 CFM CPU Cooler ($54.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: MSI B450 Gaming Plus MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard ($126.81 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL16 Memory ($149.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Define S2 ATX Mid Tower Case ($148.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: RM550x power supply unit 550 W ATX Black
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
No doubt, that would be a very solid build. But I know you mentioned not liking that case before and since your case is something you are likely to keep for a very long time, maybe forever in some cases, it's kind of important to make SURE you get something that can not only accommodate all your hardware and has all the features you NEED, but also that you like. If you don't LIKE it, the rest seems less important.

There are definitely some options for you like I said before that you might want to look at. I like the Define R6 and it's one of the better cases you can get in my opinion, but I actually like the Define S2 better because it is the same case but without the drive cages in the way blocking airflow between the front intake fans and the rest of the case.

And as much as I like the Define S2, the Meshify S2 might be an even better choice because it has much better cooling performance due to the full mesh front panel that allows unrestricted airflow.

Aside from those though there are definitely a lot of other choices out there that are really good options.

The Lian Li PC-001 Dynamic and Antec P120 Crystal are both good choices. So are the Phanteks Enthoo Pro M, Be Quiet Silent base 801, Corsair Crystal 460X and on the budget side of things the Fractal design Focus G, Cougar MX330-G, Phanteks P400 and Be Quiet Pure base 500 are all pretty good cases. In particular I think any of the Fractal design cases, the Phanteks Enthoo Pro M, the Cougar MX330-G and both the PC-001 Dynamic and P120 crystal are very good but there are certainly many more cases out there that are very solid choices.

For me, I think the items of most concern are simply that there are at least five fan locations including at least two front, two top and one rear, plus a suitable amount of room on the right hand side of the motherboard tray for cable management, and I really prefer it if there is a full mesh or at least very unrestricted front opening especially with systems that we know are going to have a fairly high TDP and a moderately capable discreet graphics card. Having no top to bottom drive cages in the left compartment of the case is a plus to me, because it impedes airflow, but I can live with it in some cases. Dust filters for the front intake and for the bottom PSU vent are also big, important considerations. It makes a huge difference on keeping the inside of your rig clean.

These are all things that later on you might kick yourself in the ass about if you don't consider them now.
 

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