Question 10900KF. Do I need (any real benefit) to overclock?

mahanddeem

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Hello,
I picked up a 10900KF and an Asus Z590-A Prime with a Corsair Vengeance 3600MHz 8GBx2 kit. I have an Asus 1080Ti from my previous build. I use Noctua D15S cooler.

Currently running the CPU with Asus MCE (multicore enhancement) enabled with removing all limits. Set SVID behavior to typical (I had a freeze on Best Scenario)
SP is 63 :(

Now the system is stable, voltage at load around 1.28v. With most settings at Auto.

I use a 1440p G sync monitor and mostly do gaming (multiplayer shooters) on the machine with occasional video rendering.

Does it really benefit me to overclock? or leave it at stock Intel settings?

I did some quick testing to sync all cores to 5.1 (AVX at 4.8) with around vcore 1.264v and did quick benching and gaming and was also fine. just wanted to test the CPU (before the return period ends). Some benches seems %2 to 4% lower!

I don't see it common in the internet for a 10900K to be oc'ed to 5.3GHz all cores synced with a reasonable voltage/temps. While I can see 2 cores can (at stock) run 5.3GHz.

Thanks
 
Hello,
I picked up a 10900KF and an Asus Z590-A Prime with a Corsair Vengeance 3600MHz 8GBx2 kit. I have an Asus 1080Ti from my previous build. I use Noctua D15S cooler.

Currently running the CPU with Asus MCE (multicore enhancement) enabled with removing all limits. Set SVID behavior to typical (I had a freeze on Best Scenario)
SP is 63 :(

Now the system is stable, voltage at load around 1.28v. With most settings at Auto.

I use a 1440p G sync monitor and mostly do gaming (multiplayer shooters) on the machine with occasional video rendering.

Does it really benefit me to overclock? or leave it at stock Intel settings?

I did some quick testing to sync all cores to 5.1 (AVX at 4.8) with around vcore 1.264v and did quick benching and gaming and was also fine. just wanted to test the CPU (before the return period ends). Some benches seems %2 to 4% lower!

I don't see it common in the internet for a 10900K to be oc'ed to 5.3GHz all cores synced with a reasonable voltage/temps. While I can see 2 cores can (at stock) run 5.3GHz.

Thanks
Hey there,

TBH, no, you don't need to OC. It's a stellar gaming CPU, which pumps out seriously solid FPS in terms of gaming, and is pretty damn good at everything else at stock/boost speeds.

If you absolutely need the max performance from a CPU, then OC might yield you a few percent more FPS! However, when you think about it, that translates to all but a few more FPS, and if the difference was 140fps at stock or 150 OC'ed, would you notice the difference. The answer is no, the human eye cannot see the difference.

Other than small percentage increases in synthetic benchmarks, there is no reason to OC that chip.

With that said, I myself love to OC my CPU's and do so as best I can. Is it necessarily needed, probably not.
 
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mahanddeem

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Hey there,

TBH, no, you don't need to OC. It's a stellar gaming CPU, which pumps out seriously solid FPS in terms of gaming, and is pretty damn good at everything else at stock/boost speeds.

If you absolutely need the max performance from a CPU, then OC might yield you a few percent more FPS! However, when you think about it, that translates to all but a FPS, and if the difference was 140fps at stock or 150 OC'ed, would you notice the difference. The answer is no, the human eye cannot see the difference.

Other than small percentage increases in synthetic benchmarks, there is no reason to OC that chip.

With that said, I myself love to OC my CPU's and do so as best I can. Is it necessarily needed, probably not.
Thanks mate. I tend to agree with you in all of the above, EXCEPT the fact the human can not feel a difference between 140fps and 150fps, I know I can. but definitely does not worth the extra voltage maybe
 
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Thanks mate. I tend to agree with you in all of the above, EXCEPT the fact the human can not feel a difference between 140fps and 150fps, I know I can. but definitely does not worth the extra voltage maybe
:tearsofjoy: Do you know what!? In my last post, I was going to add that "anyone who claims they can see or feel the difference between 140 or 150 FPS is talking out their rear end!" :sweatsmile::tearsofjoy: I decided not to, because it's very much a subjective thing.

No, long-term, it's not worth the extra voltage.

Edit: Perhaps I should have been more specific in terms of FPS. Maybe 144hz v 165hz would have been a better comparison. I just rattled off 140-150hz as a generic comparison.
 
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Currently running the CPU with Asus MCE (multicore enhancement) enabled with removing all limits. Set SVID behavior to typical (I had a freeze on Best Scenario)
That's the worst thing you can do and is not intel stock settings.
Go into bios and manually put in the default intel spec numbers for pl1 pl2 and tau, then download intel extreme tuning utility and use that only for whatever software might benefit from different clocks than what default gives you, you can make profiles in it for each software separately.
 

mahanddeem

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That's the worst thing you can do and is not intel stock settings.
Go into bios and manually put in the default intel spec numbers for pl1 pl2 and tau, then download intel extreme tuning utility and use that only for whatever software might benefit from different clocks than what default gives you, you can make profiles in it for each software separately.
Thanks.
What are the default settings for p1, p2 and tau please? I want your insight on this rather than googling them.
And what do you mean "...might benefit from different clocks than what default gives you.."?

This?
 
Yes, those are the correct numbers.
And what do you mean "...might benefit from different clocks than what default gives you.."?
Light workloads that use all cores will be limited to 4.8 Ghz for 56 seconds, so for things like the rare game that uses all cores you can make a profile with tau unlimited and higher core clocks for all core, games run with much less power draw so it's much easier to pull off.
 

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