Question 2 weeks with new modem, getting worse speeds than with old modem

g-unit1111

Titan
Moderator
So I'm trying to figure out what exactly is wrong with my internet connection. My ISP (Spectrum) says that I'm configured to get 300 MBP/s when the speed tests show that I'm only getting 30 MBP/s, and in some cases less than that. I replaced my old Netgear modem with the Spectrum provided one and even on heavy use (there are 4 desktops, 3 laptops, and a couple of tablets and other connected devices that share this connection). I use the Ookla speed test to determine my speeds, and this is where I am getting those numbers. Should I get in touch with Spectrum to find out what's causing the lags? Or is it because we're in a pandemic and everyone is online? Or is it something wrong with my router? Before I plunk $300 on a new router I want to make absolutely certain that it's what will get me the 300 MBP/s that I am paying for per month.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
More information needed.

Update your post to include ISP (Spectrum) service, make and model information for modem and router, how many wired and wireless devices?

Any switches, Access Points, powerline adapters, etc.?

Overall, my thought is that there is some network misconfiguration or conflict.

A good starting point is to trace and inspect all network related wires and cables. Look for loose connections, signs of damage, kinked or crushed wires, bare conductor being visible.

Look at the router's administration screens. Check for missing or unidentified devices. Check the established DHCP IP address range. Any static IPs?

Ensure that network devices, when applicable, do not have both wired and wireless network adapters enabled.

Only one adapter (either wired or wireless) should be enabled.

Sketch out the network to show all devices and connections to obtain the "big picture view".

Swap in known working (at speed) cables in key locations: e.g. between modem and router or router and switch.

Disconnect all devices except modem, router, and a "main pc" (wired recommended).

Try main pc to router and main pc direct to modem.

Determine if you can obtain higher speeds. (You will not get the full 300 - you should however have more than 30).

If you can obtain the expected speeds via a simple modem --> router ---> main pc setup then start adding other devices one by one. One particular device may drive down network performance.
 

g-unit1111

Titan
Moderator
1. I could not find any information on the make and model of the modem other than it's Spectrum / Charter produced equipment. I took a picture of the back of the device and it has the model number on it. I edited the serial numbers and IP / MAC addresses accordingly:



2. I do have a range extender and that is about it. I do have the make / model of that - it's a Netgear EX6200 and I need that to extend the range of my network into parts of the house where it cannot reach.

3. That's what I am thinking. I am planning on calling Spectrum sometime today.

4. Yeah that's one thing I think could be a problem is that the cabinet where my wifi adapter sits now is home to a rat's nest of cables and my attempts to sort things out have only made it worse. My router right now is a TP Link Archer 2600 and it has relatively basic connectivity with only 3 wires (input to router, input to modem, A/C adapter) so I can't imagine that would be it, though I could certainly give that a shot.

5. There are no wired adapters on this network, it's almost entirely wireless.

6. There are 3 desktop PCs, 4 laptops, 2 tablets, and a few smart devices like Chromecasts, a Ring Bell, and things of that nature.

7. I did that.

8. I attempted to hard wire my laptop to my modem directly but my laptop didn't like the connection. Is there something that I am doing wrong there?

9. Spectrum says that I should be able to, and they did the last time I called them, which is why I got the modem in the first place.

The other thing I could think could be a problem too is that the cable connection in my house hasn't been updated in like 20 years. And it was from the days when we had a monopoly on who our cable provider was (it was a small mom and pop operation that got swallowed by Adelphia, which got swallowed by Time Warner / Spectrum), and they required an A/B switch in order to operate the cable TV. Is it possible that could be the culprit?
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Regards your #8.

On the laptop did you disable the wireless adapter and then enable the wired adapter?

Is that A/B switch still in place? Is it still needed? What was the switch "switching" between? Two TVs?

If viable, temporarily remove the switch from service(?) and see if network performance improves.

Also this:

" TP Link Archer 2600 and it has relatively basic connectivity with only 3 wires (input to router, input to modem, A/C adapter) "

Do you have the router's User Guide?

I found the following link (do verify that the link is a match to your router):

https://static.tp-link.com/Archer C2600_V1_User Guid.pdf

If I follow correctly there should only be one wire between modem and router.

What router ports are in use and what are they connected to?

Connectivity (line diagram):

ISP --- coax ----> modem --- ethernet cable ---> router --- ethernet cable-- -> range extender and other wired devices if any.

Plus ~~~ wireless ~~~~> Wireless devices (aproximately 10).

Did you assign a static IP address to the Range Extender?

Do you have a list of the IP addresses (DHCP or Static as applicable) and MAC's for all of those devices?

The router's admin screens can be used to view attached devices. (See Chapter 9, Section 2 beginning on physically numbered Page 56 in the User Guide linked above.)

Look for possible IP conflicts - especially the Smart devices. Especially if there is some chance that any given device could have reverted its' default IP/configuration.
 

g-unit1111

Titan
Moderator
Regards your #8.

On the laptop did you disable the wireless adapter and then enable the wired adapter?

Is that A/B switch still in place? Is it still needed? What was the switch "switching" between? Two TVs?

If viable, temporarily remove the switch from service(?) and see if network performance improves.

Also this:

" TP Link Archer 2600 and it has relatively basic connectivity with only 3 wires (input to router, input to modem, A/C adapter) "

Do you have the router's User Guide?
1. I tried to do that, I'm not really experienced in all of the networking features of Windows 10 so I'm not really sure how to enable a hard-wired connection. I'm also on a new laptop too, if that counts.

2. No the A/B switch is not in place, but the A/B cables are. I don't know if I would have to have a technician come out and fix that, though because of COVID, that's the last thing I would want to have done right now. But I am willing if it is absolutely necessary.

3. Unfortunately no.

Did you assign a static IP address to the Range Extender?
No.

Do you have a list of the IP addresses (DHCP or Static as applicable) and MAC's for all of those devices?
Yes.

The router's admin screens can be used to view attached devices. (See Chapter 9, Section 2 beginning on physically numbered Page 56 in the User Guide linked above.)
I checked my range extender setup program and it said that I was getting only a 15% signal from my Wifi adapter. I moved it to another area where it would get a better signal, and that worked some as I was able to increase the speed to 78 MPB/s. So it's definitely something to do with my router, I just can't figure out what.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
First use "WIN" + "I" > Network & Internet to explore the current configuration. What do you see in "Change adapter options"?

What you may need to do is disable the wireless network adapter and enable the wired network adapter.

A/B cables: Where, if anywhere, do those cables now go?

Are you able to run "ipconfig /all" via the Command Prompt and post the results?

Likewise for "arp -a".
 

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