[SOLVED] 2000W PSU vs Dual-PSU for Workstation (Deep Learning, Machine Learning, Crypto Mining)

Dec 9, 2021
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original post edited to reflect some updates (check the bottom of the post for an explanation)

Hi All,

I'm planning a new PC with an AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X and 4x Nvidia 3080 3090 and I'm undecided about getting a single 2000 W PSU or 2 smaller PSUs in a dual-PSU setup (using the Add2Psu adapter).

The OuterVision Power Supply Calculator recommends 1908 W for my build (with x4 3080): https://outervision.com/b/9Of8MZ
The OuterVision Power Supply Calculator recommends 2036 W for my build (with x4 3090): https://outervision.com/b/YiYgQ6

This instead is the list of the components (it should be 4x 3080 but PCPartPicker doesn't allow me to add more than 1 GPU): https://pcpartpicker.com/list/98kRfP
This instead is the list of the components (it should be 4x 3090 but PCPartPicker doesn't allow me to add more than 1 GPU): https://pcpartpicker.com/list/rgYqYg

The PC case is yet to be decided depending on the PSU choice too, in case I opt for the dual-PSU.
For the cooling I'm going to use IceGiant ProSiphon Elite for the CPU, meanwhile for the GPUs I will setup a custom water-cooling system once I can get the 3rd/4th GPU (right now I cannot get even a single Founder Edition).

This machine is going to be used for my work-from-home, to train deep learning models for work (hence the 4x GPUs), machine learning models for data science competitions like Kaggle (hence the 64 cores for training in parallel with Scikit-Learn and similar Python libraries), probably some crypto mining (which could eat most of the computing power while I'm not working) and no gaming whatsoever.

Budget is not a huge concern as I use it for work but I have another blue print for a cheaper machine with an AMD 3970X in case I decide to spend less.
My goal is to get a great workstation for a non-business price (less than pre-built deep learning machines) and keep it for 5+ years.

At the following link they say that a 1600W/1800W PSU is ok for 4x3080 and a 2000W one is ok for 4x3090: https://timdettmers.com/2020/09/07/which-gpu-for-deep-learning/

For my case I trust more think the OuterVision calcs are more reliable.

I've searched the websites of many PSU producers (https://www.ranker.com/list/the-best-power-supply-manufacturers/computer-hardware up to Zalman) and these are all the 2000W+ PSUs I've found:
I've read few reviews and forum/reddit threads but I'm not really convinced on any of them, maybe the SilverStone HELA 2050 Platinum but is not yet available.

I've also read the following thread: https://linustechtips.com/topic/300961-high-wattage-psus-useless-2000w-80-platinum-psu/

My main goals are the following:
  • get a reliable and safe power supply to run my machine heavily (the plan is to use it 24/7 across deep learning, machine learning, crypto mining)
    • "reliable" to avoid any downtime given that I'll use the machine for work
    • "safe" to avoid any potential damage to the expensive hardware
  • keep the noise at a minimum given that I'll keep it in my bedroom and run it while sleeping
  • I'm not really planning of overclocking the CPU, GPUs, etc., but I could test it in case I see fit
My questions are the following:
Pardon me for the long thread and thanks for all your answers!

Edits:
  • 10-Dec-2021
    • today I've been able to make an online order for an NVIDIA FE 3090 on a GPU drop as it popped up on the NVIDIA website (sold via an European partner online shop). I was hoping to get a 3080 Ti and/or a 3080 as well and re-sell the 3090 later on but I haven't been able so I'll probably stick to the 3090 and modify my build. I've been quite lucky to get an FE as the website was mostly down during the process.
    • I've found this interesting blog post from Lambda Labs (a maker of deep learning workstations) which gives some good information on multi-GPU build with NVIDIA RTX 30 series cards: https://lambdalabs.com/blog/deep-learning-hardware-deep-dive-rtx-30xx/
    • The above 2 points are skewing my decision towards a dual-PSU setup.
 
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For my case I trust more the OuterVision calcs.
You be you. ;-)

OuterVision REALLY over-estimated. Which isn't a bad thing, per se.

If you have the cash for a 2000W PSU, I'll entertain that idea.

The EVGA and the FSP Cannon are both pretty much the same FSP PSU. I'm not a fan of FSP.

The GameMax PSU is a fire hazard.

That leaves the Super Flower or the SilverStone.

The SilverStone was recently reviewed here: https://www.techpowerup.com/review/silverstone-hela-2050-w/

But I would like to address the "negative" points made in the review.

"Relative performance" is "not impressive" and "low efficiency with low loads" and "loose load regulation" because he's comparing a 2050W PSU with 1800W and lower PSUs. The higher the wattage, the more the voltage will drop and the lower the low load efficiency will be, etc. So it's not a fair assessment unless he gets other 2000W PSUs to compare against. The "poor hold up time" is along the same lines. He reviews hold up time with 100% load. If 100% load is 2050W, then you're going to need super gigantic caps or really high bus voltage to obtain anything near 16ms. Given that a "selling point" is the small size, you're not going to have room for that extra bulk cap.

The SuperFlower has been around forever. But they're REALLY hard to find because SuperFlower is a really small company with a really small factory and they'd rather crank out PSUs that they can sell in volume than a 2000W PSU that they may sell one a month of.

Also, what region are you in? You're going to need 230V mains to run any of these.
 
Last edited:
For my case I trust more the OuterVision calcs.
You be you. ;-)

OuterVision REALLY over-estimated. Which isn't a bad thing, per se.

If you have the cash for a 2000W PSU, I'll entertain that idea.

The EVGA and the FSP Cannon are both pretty much the same FSP PSU. I'm not a fan of FSP.

The GameMax PSU is a fire hazard.

That leaves the Super Flower or the SilverStone.

The SilverStone was recently reviewed here: https://www.techpowerup.com/review/silverstone-hela-2050-w/

But I would like to address the "negative" points made in the review.

"Relative performance" is "not impressive" and "low efficiency with low loads" and "loose load regulation" because he's comparing a 2050W PSU with 1800W and lower PSUs. The higher the wattage, the more the voltage will drop and the lower the low load efficiency will be, etc. So it's not a fair assessment unless he gets other 2000W PSUs to compare against. The "poor hold up time" is along the same lines. He reviews hold up time with 100% load. If 100% load is 2050W, then you're going to need super gigantic caps or really high bus voltage to obtain anything near 16ms. Given that a "selling point" is the small size, you're not going to have room for that extra bulk cap.

The SuperFlower has been around forever. But they're REALLY hard to find because SuperFlower is a really small company with a really small factory and they'd rather crank out PSUs that they can sell in volume than a 2000W PSU that they may sell one a month of.

Also, what region are you in? You're going to need 230V mains to run any of these.
 
Last edited:
Dec 9, 2021
2
0
10
0
You be you. ;-)

OuterVision REALLY over-estimated. Which isn't a bad thing, per se.
Ehehe... thank you jonnyguru! I actually realised it by reading few other comments. Not such a bad thing (better than the opposite) but still, I would have preferred a more accurate estimate.

If you have the cash for a 2000W PSU, I'll entertain that idea.

The EVGA and the FSP Cannon are both pretty much the same FSP PSU. I'm not a fan of FSP.

The GameMax PSU is a fire hazard.

That leaves the Super Flower or the SilverStone.

The SilverStone was recently reviewed here: https://www.techpowerup.com/review/silverstone-hela-2050-w/

But I would like to address the "negative" points made in the review.

"Relative performance" is "not impressive" and "low efficiency with low loads" and "loose load regulation" because he's comparing a 2050W PSU with 1800W and lower PSUs. The higher the wattage, the more the voltage will drop and the lower the low load efficiency will be, etc. So it's not a fair assessment unless he gets other 2000W PSUs to compare against. The "poor hold up time" is along the same lines. He reviews hold up time with 100% load. If 100% load is 2050W, then you're going to need super gigantic caps or really high bus voltage to obtain anything near 16ms. Given that a "selling point" is the small size, you're not going to have room for that extra bulk cap.

The SuperFlower has been around forever. But they're REALLY hard to find because SuperFlower is a really small company with a really small factory and they'd rather crank out PSUs that they can sell in volume than a 2000W PSU that they may sell one a month of.
Many thanks for all the "color"! This is extremely useful.
Apart from this, today I've bought an FE 3090 so I'm probably going to modify my build to 4x3090.
What would you suggest in that case?

Also, what region are you in? You're going to need 230V mains to run any of these.
I'm UK based and we use 230V for the sockets here so I guess I shouldn't have much problems in this regard.
 
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