5TB External HDDs Arriving in Three Months?

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back_by_demand

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[citation][nom]amk-aka-phantom[/nom]No... why should it? Different markets, sadly.[/citation]
Some of the SSD market is reliant on people moving from HDD to SSD, usually when the price hits the sweet-spot per person on the cost-per-GB basis, so when the cost of HDDs drops the incentive to move widens the gap, they may be different markets but they are linked at the point people switch camps.
 

mickey21

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[citation][nom]jcb82[/nom]Yippee.. lets get technical! Assuming typical CD-quality music, then you're dealing with PCM 16 bit 44.1khz quality sound, which has an uncompressed bit rate of 1411.1kilobits/second. Convert that to kiloBYTES is 176.4KB/s. Also, 1024 KB = 1 MB, and 1024 MB = 1 GB not multiples of 1000!! So convert to real storage numbers 5*1000/1024 = 4.8828125. 4.8828125*1024*1024*1024/176.4 = 29721542 seconds of music or 344 days of music.[/citation]
Have you considered that he may be talking about how Hard Drive manufacturers calculate TB for their hard drives, which is by 1000, not 1024. Not that I am saying he is right, but not as wrong as you make him out to be.

 

JOSHSKORN

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[citation][nom]oxxfatelostxxo[/nom]Im confused why they would come out with external before internal?[/citation]
Well think about it from a different perspective. Who NEEDS 5 TB of data on their internal HDD? Virtually no one. This way, at least the 5 TB can be shared on a home network if users have the know-how to implement something like that.
 
[citation][nom]dalmvern[/nom]Larger capacity drives usually come out as external first because internal drives have space limitation where externals dont.[/citation]

says the guy on a pentium 4 windows XP PC

5 bucks says he so insecure he will come back and post his complete comuter specs all the way down to the chassis
 

halcyon

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[citation][nom]Benihana[/nom]This is great news! It means that a 5TB Western Digital drive should be in the works![/citation]

That's what I was thinking. I'm looking forward to getting my hands on a 5TB 7200RPM WD drive
 

Kamab

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[citation][nom]soccerdocks[/nom]It cannot hold countless hours of music. At least not music thats worth listening to. I exclusively use lossless audio because 128 and 256 kbs mp3s sound like crap. Most lossless audio files are around 30 megs. That means I can store 165,000 songs on that drive. Thats alot, but no where near limitless.[/citation]

This sounds like the guy at work that told me playing back audio from his 500GB ssd has better sound quality than from a conventional HDD. hahaha
 

jcb82

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I'm surprised that they've not been promoting hybrid SSD/HDD drives more these days. If it were to system-build I'd go with a 64GB SSD drive for my OS and a regular HDD for media and non-essential apps.
 

loubarouba

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can computers even recognize 5tb hard drives? or will an add-on card be necessary?

[citation][nom]tomfreak[/nom]Bring in the affordable >2TB 7200rpm INTERNAL HDD now! I have 3x Samsung 103SJ already.[/citation]

you can get a 2tb WD20EARS hard drive for 75 bucks now...canadian..80 on newegg.ca

[citation][nom]eklipz330[/nom]god damnit i just got a spinpoint f3 1tb hdd, upgrading from 150gb... GAHHH[/citation]

those spinpoints are solid hdds...plus u can never have too many hard drives, i've got 6 hard drives (6.25tb worth and 1 of which is an f3)..i'm kinda a digital hoarder XD
 

Sb1

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[citation][nom]loubarouba[/nom] 1. Can computers even recognize 5tb hard drives? 2. Or will an add-on card be necessary?[/citation]

1. You need the newer UEFI BIOS to read them without any hassle. Just built a new PC for my aunt and uncle, Asus P8Z68-V and it has a great UEFI BIOS, I love it. Crucial M4 128GB SSD, very nice, not the fastest, but rather have good quality than too much speed and RMA's. Especially if not my PC, where Images and what not I could deal with it easier, non tech people, it would be a big PITA.

Got a WD 3TB green drive and the Asus MB and Win7 x64 recognized it just fine. I did run a 6 hour hard drive test on it before I started using it and am happy with it. I like my Samsung HD204UI 2TB drives, but that WD is the one I'd like in my system.

I'm turned off of Seagate right now, but maybe they'll start doing better quality control with these 5TB's? I really, really hope so. I'm hoping that SpinRite 6 will eventually come out with 6.1 to handle these bigger drives. I'm sure it does just fine, but it's an old program, and would feel much more comfortable with a newer version, just in case the bigger drives I'll eventually will be buying run into problems.

2. The right addon cards should work just fine. I thought I read many months ago that some models come with one?

I was thinking of an addon card and such and more DDR2 RAM for my Intel 775 (Q6600) PC. But I'm just going to hold off and build all new and I'll get UEFI BIOS, USB 3.0 and PCIe 3.0 that just came out.

Of course it helps I'm close to a Micro Center though. Their CPU, MB combo's are very, very competitive.

 

halcyon

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[citation][nom]__-_-_-__[/nom]also 5 platers are hard to place on a single 3.5HDD, with external they can make it bigger.[/citation]
Are you saying that a 5-platter drive is physically bigger (hard drive casing) than a 3-platter drive?
 
I've never trusted Samsung's products & I still don't trust them. They don't really last as long as other well known products,bar the HP although,they could even be worse.
thanks.http://www.uklv.info/g.php

you must be rough with your gear man cause i have a 5+ year old samsung LCD monitor still running strong with no issues or dead pixels HP is nothing but cheap crap and is cheaper low wuality crap than samsung and thats says somtething

FAIL at spreading the hate :hello:

 

danwat1234

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[citation][nom]dalmvern[/nom]Larger capacity drives usually come out as external first because internal drives have space limitation where externals dont.[/citation]
The drives in the desktop external enclosures are always standard height 3.5" drives, not thicker. So you can usually hack open the case and throw it in your computer case, no problem.
Super high capacity 2.5" external drives may be different. For instance, Seagate GoFlex Freeagent uses a 4-platter 1.5TB drive that is 14-15mm thick instead of the normal 9.5mm (2platter) or 12.5mm(3platter) form factor.
 

danwat1234

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[citation][nom]halcyon[/nom]Are you saying that a 5-platter drive is physically bigger (hard drive casing) than a 3-platter drive?[/citation]
Nope, they can stuff up to 5 platter in a standard height 3.5" drive case. They just sometimes put those drives in external enclosures so they can I guess jack up prices more.
 

killerb255

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[citation][nom]Igot1forya[/nom]When will the industry realize that these values are meaningless.[/citation]

When the average Joe is no longer a technology consumer (IOW: never). Believe it or not, there are plenty of people out there that have no clue what a gigabyte is.
 

valu3hunt3r

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[citation][nom]jcb82[/nom]I'm surprised that they've not been promoting hybrid SSD/HDD drives more these days. If it were to system-build I'd go with a 64GB SSD drive for my OS and a regular HDD for media and non-essential apps.[/citation]

Why do that when you can have people buy a SSD and HDD separate (2 separate items, 2 separate markets, 2 separate revenue streams) and use the SSD for OS and the mechanical HDD/s for storage.

Alternatively on Intel Z68 chipsets you could have your cake and eat it too with Intel Smart Response Technology - SRT [http://www.hardocp.com/article/2011/05/11/intel_smart_response_technology_srt/].

Beyond all that; hybrid drives would not be the most ideal of storage devices because it would be cost prohibitive (data chips and controllers for SSD drives are not cheap and it will be a few more years before these become as cheap and widespread as mechanical HDDs, meaning these hybrid drives would be more expensive) for pure storage purposes (NAS/File Servers/DAS/etc.) where cheap and reliable access to data is more important than speed.

RAID + a copy for a separate offsite backup gets expensive very quickly with SSDs; which wouldn't see them being used to their full potential while sitting idle 90% of their uptime anyway.

As to the article itself, isn't this the same tech that was developed by Samsung previously before Seagate purchased their HDD division?
 

ngoy

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[citation][nom]molo9000[/nom]5TB drives? Those would be sweet for my NAS...No problem with seagate unreliability when using RAID 5[/citation]

Ummm, yeah you have a problem. Do you have any idea how long it would take to rebuild a 5TB drive in an array? Probably 2 days. And Seagate's current reliability is so suspect you probably would have 2 more drives fail in that time if one already did. (I'm assuming you are joking about having no problems with seagate unreliability) I went from WD to Seagate and now am on Samsung. This is over the course of the past 25 years or so. I don't remember the first manufacturer of the first 32MB hard drive I bought, but most people don't remember MFM, RLL, ESDI or the really old drive interfaces anyways. Or having to manually figure out interleaving for drives, etc...

Anyways, I don't know why anyone downrated your comment presumably on Seagate reliability. They suck. And that the series is discontinued, you can't even find the reviews on newegg without knowing the old part number. I don't even think the 3+4+5 star ratings even added up to 60%. I've basically decided that the 4+5 star review better add up close to over 75% before I even bother with that hard drive anymore, because backing up anything over 1TB is a pain in the rear end and is an enormous time sink.

So I'll buy if the reviews add up, but I sure am not holding my breath. I've had 3 seagates of different sizes die in less than 3 months of use (one was within a week), and all my computers are plugged into UPS.
 
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