[SOLVED] 9700k overclock

zdtaft

Prominent
Sep 29, 2018
21
0
510
0
Hello just got my first gaming pc built and was looking into overclocking.trying for 5.0 overclock.i ve read some specs and was just wondering if 1.30 volts was ok to run permantly.9700k ,corsair h115i aio,asus z390 mobo,4intake and 3 exhaust fans counting the radiator.also if this would crash as i expect it will in my trial and errors will resetting the cmos clear windows 10 from my memory as well?any veteran advice is always appreciated and thank you for sharing your knowledge!
 

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
zdtaft,

We actually have a Guide that covers this topic. It's a "Sticky" near the top of the CPUs Forum, so if you look you can't miss it. Read the entire Guide, but pay close attention to Section 11 - Thermal Test Basics:

Intel Temperature Guide - https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/intel-temperature-guide.1488337/

It's not a good idea to run any version of Prime95 using AVX.

The latest version of Prime95 is 29.8, which allows you to easily disable all AVX selections by just clicking on the boxes.

• Prime95 v29.8 - https://www.mersenne.org/download/

Click on the boxes for AVX2 and AVX to disable those AVX codes. Run only Small FFT's. 10 minutes is more than adequate to give you a valid thermal baseline.

The following is from the Guide:

"Prime95 v29.8 Small FFT's with all AVX selections disabled)is ideally suited for testing thermal performance, because it conforms to Intel's Datasheets as a steady 100% workload with steady Core temperatures. No other utility can so closely replicate Intel's thermal test workload."

"AVX - Advanced Vector Extension (AVX) Instruction Sets were introduced with Core i 2nd Generation CPU’s, then AVX2 with 4th Generation and AVX512 with later Generations of High End Desktop (HEDT) CPU’s as in certain X-Series, Extreme, i9’s and i7’s. Running versions of Prime95 with AVX enabled imposes an unrealistic 130% workload which can adversely affect stability and severely overload your CPU. 2nd and 3rd Generations are less affected, but Core temperatures on 4th through 9th Generations may be over 20°C higher.

Many 6th through 9th Generation motherboards address the AVX problem by providing “offset” adjustments (downclock) in BIOS. -3 (300 MHz) or more may be needed to limit Core temperatures to 85°C. Since 4th and 5th Generations don’t have AVX offsets, you can create individual BIOS Profiles for AVX and non-AVX software. Except for a few utilities and specialized computational apps, AVX intensive real-world apps (rendering, transcoding) and recent games with AVX shouldn’t exceed Prime95's test workload without AVX.

As per Intel’s Datasheets, TDP and Thermal Specifications are validated “without AVX. In Prime95 versions from 27.7 through 29.4, AVX can be disabled by inserting CpuSupportsAVX=0 into the local.txt file, which appears in Prime95's folder after the first run. However, since Core temperatures will be the same as 29.8 without AVX, it's easier to just use 29.8. You can also use 26.6 which doesn't have AVX. Core i 1st Generation, Core 2, Pentium and Celeron processors don't have AVX Instruction Sets, so they're not affected."

"Here's the nominal operating range for Core temperature:

Core temperatures above 85°C are not recommended.

Core temperatures below 80°C are ideal.



Core temperatures increase and decrease with ambient (room) temperature."

CT :sol:
 

crazily

Prominent
May 27, 2018
82
6
565
13
heh. No windows 10 would not be cleared. All resetting the cmos does is take power away from a small ram chip with the bios settings stored onto it. It basically factory defaults the bios settings without the computer needing to be on to do so. As for 1.3 volts. Lots of cpu's run at 1.3 volts. I don't see any issue there as long as the temperatures aren't absurd.
 

jostegogar

Upstanding
Mar 26, 2019
284
29
240
10
u shouldnt jump on 1.3 at 5Ghz. start with 1.270 and 4.6ghz and slowly go up until u find the right spot. i know people running 5GHz all cores with 1.270 voltage
 

TechyInAZ

Polypheme
Moderator
As said, the best way is to work up to 5ghz. But if you absolutely want that 5Ghz overclock, you can try starting at 1.3v, stress testing and seeing if you have to go up in voltage or down. Typically for efficient overclocks 4.8-4.9ghz is the sweet spot.
 

alceryes

Distinguished
As said, the best way is to work up to 5ghz. But if you absolutely want that 5Ghz overclock, you can try starting at 1.3v, stress testing and seeing if you have to go up in voltage or down. Typically for efficient overclocks 4.8-4.9ghz is the sweet spot.
Agreed. Yes, 5000Mhz is a nice round number that you may or may not be able to hit, stable. You may also find that you can get very close at substantially lower voltage and much less of a headache.

I've found that my i9-9900k is happiest at a constant 4797Mhz with a ring bus at 4587Mhz @ 1.23-1.25v (depending on load). I could take off my BCLK OC and let it boost some cores to 5000Mhz to get higher scores in some benches but the higher ring bus actually gets me higher scores in other benches so it's not really worth it from an overall score perspective.
For my chip, to boost to 5000Mhz on a couple cores requires a substantially higher voltage. I'm running it on an H80i v2. Unfortunately, I can't do Prime95, small FFT, with AVX2 for any length of time - it's just too much heat for the H80i v2. It starts throttling. All other benches (including non-AVX2 Prime95) are fine.
 

zdtaft

Prominent
Sep 29, 2018
21
0
510
0
Ok so i went with the 1.270 at 5ghz from the start.good recommendation.just asking did i get super lucky with this?i ran through my overclock with settings from others i saw posted elsewhere and the only thing i did different was the lower voltage.temps hit 88F at the highest.i ran cinebench for a half hour then gamed for about an hour and all was well.just wondered if i was missing somthing?thanks again
 

zdtaft

Prominent
Sep 29, 2018
21
0
510
0
Ok so i tried prime 95 that must be rough!made it about 15 seconds and blue screen.any thoughts on where to start looking into my issue?pc works for what i need it for which is gaming but i find this a fascinating thing.also am i hurting my pc with this?thanks in advance!
 

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
zdtaft,

We actually have a Guide that covers this topic. It's a "Sticky" near the top of the CPUs Forum, so if you look you can't miss it. Read the entire Guide, but pay close attention to Section 11 - Thermal Test Basics:

Intel Temperature Guide - https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/intel-temperature-guide.1488337/

It's not a good idea to run any version of Prime95 using AVX.

The latest version of Prime95 is 29.8, which allows you to easily disable all AVX selections by just clicking on the boxes.

• Prime95 v29.8 - https://www.mersenne.org/download/

Click on the boxes for AVX2 and AVX to disable those AVX codes. Run only Small FFT's. 10 minutes is more than adequate to give you a valid thermal baseline.

The following is from the Guide:

"Prime95 v29.8 Small FFT's with all AVX selections disabled)is ideally suited for testing thermal performance, because it conforms to Intel's Datasheets as a steady 100% workload with steady Core temperatures. No other utility can so closely replicate Intel's thermal test workload."

"AVX - Advanced Vector Extension (AVX) Instruction Sets were introduced with Core i 2nd Generation CPU’s, then AVX2 with 4th Generation and AVX512 with later Generations of High End Desktop (HEDT) CPU’s as in certain X-Series, Extreme, i9’s and i7’s. Running versions of Prime95 with AVX enabled imposes an unrealistic 130% workload which can adversely affect stability and severely overload your CPU. 2nd and 3rd Generations are less affected, but Core temperatures on 4th through 9th Generations may be over 20°C higher.

Many 6th through 9th Generation motherboards address the AVX problem by providing “offset” adjustments (downclock) in BIOS. -3 (300 MHz) or more may be needed to limit Core temperatures to 85°C. Since 4th and 5th Generations don’t have AVX offsets, you can create individual BIOS Profiles for AVX and non-AVX software. Except for a few utilities and specialized computational apps, AVX intensive real-world apps (rendering, transcoding) and recent games with AVX shouldn’t exceed Prime95's test workload without AVX.

As per Intel’s Datasheets, TDP and Thermal Specifications are validated “without AVX. In Prime95 versions from 27.7 through 29.4, AVX can be disabled by inserting CpuSupportsAVX=0 into the local.txt file, which appears in Prime95's folder after the first run. However, since Core temperatures will be the same as 29.8 without AVX, it's easier to just use 29.8. You can also use 26.6 which doesn't have AVX. Core i 1st Generation, Core 2, Pentium and Celeron processors don't have AVX Instruction Sets, so they're not affected."

"Here's the nominal operating range for Core temperature:

Core temperatures above 85°C are not recommended.

Core temperatures below 80°C are ideal.



Core temperatures increase and decrease with ambient (room) temperature."

CT :sol:
 

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