A New Perspective On VR: The Sulon Cortex, Hands On

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lancelot123

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I'm assuming the ball on the back is there to help make it not so front heavy as well as other uses. Balancing the weight out like that is a great idea.
 

eldragon0

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I don't see how the distinguishing points here really make it that much better than other options. First off, speculation: I'd be willing to say the final release of the Oculus will have room wide movement, as they have been going more and more towards movement with each update. Secondly, Assuming the tracking is the same, I'd be willing to say that if it's developed for unreal, using that same demo with the oculus or really any other vr would net the same result of being able to move around the scene. They are just the ones to show it off first.
 

Quait

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"As the soldier fought each enemy, I paced around the room, watching the fight from every possible angle. I stood behind the main character as he was pushed to the wall and turned around just in time to see the tiling crumble behind me where he hit the wall. In a way, I felt like the cameraman in a film production. I could move wherever I wanted and get just the right angle to give me (and the viewer) the best possible shot of whatever is going on in front of me."
Thats just a software thing. Its a demo that other VR headsets could also play.
This demo only shows what VR is capable of, not this headset in particular...
 

Charles Ellis

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I think The Avengers example mentioned is pretty crazy wishful thinking. Even if there was any chance that consumers would have hardware capable of rendering those scenes in real time within the decade, it's unlikely that film studios would take advantage of that ability. They're just not in the business of making fully immersive scenes that you can explore, as described in this article.

Ignoring even all of the budgetary concerns that come with expanding every scene to the degree necessary to support such an experience, imagine how difficult it would be to direct such a beast. Approving a particular take when there are a bunch of things potentially going on which the director can't be watching at any particular moment would really slow the process immensely.

I could see something of the sort being developed by dedicated studios working on content specifically for that medium, but I highly doubt that traditional films will make that transition.
 

d_kuhn

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So it seems to me that limiting the pov to one side of a scene is a software choice not some limitation on the hardware. It's possible that one headset will allow you to rotate 360 degrees and the other won't... and that's a cool feature, but motion limitations (unless you're house is huge) means any headset will have hand based motion (joystick or something) that would allow you as much freedom of motion as needed.
 

wrxturbo

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I think it will still be a while before VR becomes good enough for that type of movie making. The majority of the first adopters of VR will be more interested in the potential gaming applications were you can interact with the content. Imagine playing Battlefield, Call of duty or better yet Grand Theft Auto in a virtual environment. Gamers of these games already know the limitations of a 2D environment, not being able to look around a corner without sticking your whole body in plain view or getting attacked from the side where if you had the peripheral vision like in real life you could had seen it coming. Basically it would be possible to just be aware of your surroundings so you can be the most effective at whatever.
 
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