about electric plug, electricity...

brannsiu

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when I buy an electrical product from one country and bring it to use in another country,
if the plug and the socket look matching, does it immediately imply that they can work correctly and safely? Do I
also need to think about volt or current something?
 

hotaru.hino

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The plug itself does not indicate compatibility. For example, the US and Japan both use the same plug shapes for electronics, but Japan is a clusterduck as far as what electricity they use, so US devices may not work in a Japanese socket.

There's two things you need to know about whether or not it's safe to use electronics from one country in another:
  • What frequency it uses. It's either going to be 50Hz, 60Hz, or both (Japan uses 50Hz in some parts, 60 Hz in others)
  • What voltage it uses. This is a range from 100V-125V and 220V-240V.
Generally speaking:
  • North American countries (mainly Canada, Mexico, the US, and the Caribbeans)use 110-120V 60Hz electricity
  • Europe, Asia (with the exception of some East/Southeast Asian countries), Africa, Australia, and some of South America use 220-240V 50Hz
  • The rest of the world is a mishmash of either frequency and voltage range.
Refer to this map: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/70/World_Map_of_Mains_Voltages_and_Frequencies,_Detailed.svg/2754px-World_Map_of_Mains_Voltages_and_Frequencies,_Detailed.svg.png

So to figure out whether or not the electronics are compatible in the first place, look at the label on the power brick (if it has one) or near the electricity input. It should say what frequency and voltage it uses. As for how much current it uses, this isn't something to generally worry about. If you exceed the limit on the circuit, it usually trips a breaker or blows a fuse. And if the socket specifically cannot provide the normal amounts of current, it should clearly say how much it can.

Otherwise, if your electronics are universal, you just need a passive converter. However, make sure if your plug has a ground pin that the converter also converts the ground pin. If your electronics take only one frequency and voltage, you need to get an active adapter. Note that active adapters have a power limit. Smaller ones are only good for phone chargers, and maybe up to a laptop.
 
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brannsiu

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The plug itself does not indicate compatibility. For example, the US and Japan both use the same plug shapes for electronics, but Japan is a clusterduck as far as what electricity they use, so US devices may not work in a Japanese socket.

There's two things you need to know about whether or not it's safe to use electronics from one country in another:
  • What frequency it uses. It's either going to be 50Hz, 60Hz, or both (Japan uses 50Hz in some parts, 60 Hz in others)
  • What voltage it uses. This is a range from 100V-125V and 220V-240V.
Generally speaking:
  • North American countries (mainly Canada, Mexico, the US, and the Caribbeans)use 110-120V 60Hz electricity
  • Europe, Asia (with the exception of some East/Southeast Asian countries), Africa, Australia, and some of South America use 220-240V 50Hz
  • The rest of the world is a mishmash of either frequency and voltage range.
Refer to this map: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/70/World_Map_of_Mains_Voltages_and_Frequencies,_Detailed.svg/2754px-World_Map_of_Mains_Voltages_and_Frequencies,_Detailed.svg.png

So to figure out whether or not the electronics are compatible in the first place, look at the label on the power brick (if it has one) or near the electricity input. It should say what frequency and voltage it uses. As for how much current it uses, this isn't something to generally worry about. If you exceed the limit on the circuit, it usually trips a breaker or blows a fuse. And if the socket specifically cannot provide the normal amounts of current, it should clearly say how much it can.

Otherwise, if your electronics are universal, you just need a passive converter. However, make sure if your plug has a ground pin that the converter also converts the ground pin. If your electronics take only one frequency and voltage, you need to get an active adapter. Note that active adapters have a power limit. Smaller ones are only good for phone chargers, and maybe up to a laptop.
Sorry I'll need a little bit more time to study the information.

At the moment, for example, if I want to bring electrical device sold for a country with standard voltage is 230 V and the standard frequency is 50 Hz to another country with standard voltage 220V and frequency 50Hz. Plug and socket is matching. Could there be any problem? And vice versa, I may buy electrical device from the country with 220V, 50Hz to be used in country 230V and 50Hz, could there be any problem??


Just wondering , yes, Japan has two frequencies, do people in Japan need to bring any converter with their portable electronics when travelling from one part of Japan to another with different frequency??
 
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hotaru.hino

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Sorry I'll need a little bit more time to study the information.

At the moment, for example, if I want to bring electrical device sold for a country with standard voltage is 230 V and the standard frequency is 50 Hz to another country with standard voltage 220V and frequency 50Hz. Plug and socket is matching. Could there be any problem? And vice versa, I may buy electrical device from the country with 220V, 50Hz to be used in country 230V and 50Hz, could there be any problem??


Just wondering , yes, Japan has two frequencies, do people in Japan need to bring any converter with their portable electronics when travelling from one part of Japan to another with different frequency??
Again, check the label on either the adapter itself or next to where you plug in the device. It will say what voltages and what frequency it needs to be used with.

As for Japan, I'm pretty sure all electronics sold there for domestic use are compatible with both 50 and 60Hz.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
And a more obscure issue:

Aluminum wiring (not copper) was used for awhile in some places for home wiring;. My older home has aluminum wiring.

Hopefully that will not be an issue that you will need to deal with.

For more information google "aluminum home wiring".

Example link:

https://www.carsondunlop.com/training/resources/the-true-story-behind-aluminum-wiring-part-one/

Your may need special switches and outlets: i.e., CO/ALR.

Read the link and if necessary research further.
 

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