News AMD, Intel and Nvidia CPU and GPU Pricing Expected to Increase in 2022

VforV

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How is 2022, which will have new Arc GPUs, then Lovelace and RDNA3 and then Zen4 and Raptor Lake, going to be a worse year than 2021?

Their answer: you like all this new tech that's coming? It's even more expensive than the ludicrous expensive prices we already have! That's how!

BAM! Take that PC enthusiasts!
 

logainofhades

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How is 2022, which will have new Arc GPUs, then Lovelace and RDNA3 and then Zen4 and Raptor Lake, going to be a worse year than 2021?

Their answer: you like all this new tech that's coming? It's even more expensive than the ludicrous expensive prices we already have! That's how!

BAM! Take that PC enthusiasts!
No it is called out of control inflation. Everything costs more these days.
 

btmedic04

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I called this in December 2020. Nvidia, and AMD have been closely watching what people are willing to pay scalpers and now want more of the pie. tariffs, and inflation just give them a plausible deniability excuse to further raise their profit margins. Dont believe me? take a look at the record breaking profits they have made over the last several quarters
 
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sure, that will have some affect, but will not account for the majority of the 84% year over year net income nvidia reported in Q3

NVIDIA Announces Financial Results for Third Quarter Fiscal 2022 | NVIDIA Newsroom
To me, this doesn't really sufficiently break down how this revenue was earned. If we focused specifically on gaming:
  • How much is actually from hardware sales?
  • How much is from subscriptions?
  • Is licensing/fees/misc charges from developers and partners included in this?
With none of those questions really answered (and I really don't want to spend time looking for them), that doesn't really point to any evidence that NVIDIA looked at how much the scalpers are getting and thinking they can raise prices to get a cut of it. Besides, whatever price any company puts on their product, scalpers are just going to jack it up even more as long as it's a hot ticket item.
 

spongiemaster

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Besides, whatever price any company puts on their product, scalpers are just going to jack it up even more as long as it's a hot ticket item.
The market determines what something is worth, not scalpers. You can't increase prices above what the market is willing to pay and just expect things to keep selling. If Nvidia releases the 4080 at an MSRP of $3000. Scalpers can pick whatever price they want above that, and beyond a few people with bottomless pockets, no one is going to buy them.

that doesn't really point to any evidence that NVIDIA looked at how much the scalpers are getting and thinking they can raise prices to get a cut of it.
There have been reports that the reason Nvidia is launching the recent new cards, 3080 12GB in particular, is because AIB's told Nvidia they didn't want to have to compete with the FE cards that had ridiculously below market value MSRP's. So there is evidence that if these new cards aren't targeted to increase Nvidia's profit per GPU, then they exist to increase AIB's profits per GPU sold.
 
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VforV

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To me, this doesn't really sufficiently break down how this revenue was earned. If we focused specifically on gaming:
  • How much is actually from hardware sales?
  • How much is from subscriptions?
  • Is licensing/fees/misc charges from developers and partners included in this?
With none of those questions really answered (and I really don't want to spend time looking for them), that doesn't really point to any evidence that NVIDIA looked at how much the scalpers are getting and thinking they can raise prices to get a cut of it. Besides, whatever price any company puts on their product, scalpers are just going to jack it up even more as long as it's a hot ticket item.
Don't forget miners... a big chunk is from them too.
 
The market determines what something is worth, not scalpers. You can't increase prices above what the market is willing to pay and just expect things to keep selling. If Nvidia releases the 4080 at an MSRP of $3000. Scalpers can pick whatever price they want above that, and beyond a few people with bottomless pockets, no one is going to buy them.

There have been reports that the reason Nvidia is launching the recent new cards, 3080 12GB in particular, is because AIB's told Nvidia they didn't want to have to compete with the FE cards that had ridiculously below market value MSRP's. So there is evidence that if these new cards aren't targeted to increase Nvidia's profit per GPU, then they exist to increase AIB's profits per GPU sold.
The point I'm trying to make is that if the item is expected to be in high demand, then it doesn't matter what the MSRP of it is. Scalpers will take it and try to turn it around for a profit. Yes NVIDIA could list an MSRP of $1 million and sure it will not sell, but the moment it goes down to something "acceptable", scalpers will gobble it up and try to make a profit on it. Whether or not they'll actually see any ROI is another story.

In any case, I also don't like believing everything in business and economics can be explained with a simple reason, especially with whatever the convenient excuse of the day is. Am I totally writing off that what scalpers are charging and that the market is actually paying them the sole reason for the MSRP bump? No, but I'd like to have as much information as possible before blindly going "oh they're just being greedy." It's like when people got upset that PS5 and XBS games were going to be $70, seemingly ignoring that $60 for a new game was the longest running price point, it became increasingly complex to create AAA games, and again, inflation ($60 in 2020 was worth about $45 in 2005 when the last price bump happened)

Don't forget miners... a big chunk is from them too.
I don't think they would be filed under the gaming section. They'd be in the data center section.

EDIT: At least those that ordered directly from the manufacturers.
 

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