Question AMD power management

Amddefector

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Could some one please point me in the right direction please. I basically just want the CPU (Ryzen 7 2700x) to run at 3700mhz continuously along with the aio cooler to run at max speed. I've disabled Q fan control, disabled CPU boost also in the bios but my CPU speed is still up and down like a yo-yo! Same with the aio pump and fan. I thought with the CPU turbo boost disabled it wouldn't turbo boost but it's still boosting way beyond 4ghz. With the machine sitting idle the CPU clock is constantly bouncing between 2400mhz and 4200mhz.

Any help would be appreciated thanks.
 
What motherboard do you have?

It's normal for Ryzen processors to increase and decrease clocks in use. It's the way they work to use less energy on average by providing peak performance only when it's needed. You can set a fixed clock speed to stop it but it probably won't make the fans stop surging as they follow the processor temperature. That also ramps up and down with processing loads as they come and go even with a fixed clock speed.

The real fix is to set a custom fan profile for your fans...look in your motherboard BIOS for how you do that. Another way if you don't want to work in BIOS is buy some adapters to connect your fans directly to a SATA power cable and they will run at full speed all the time. That's the bad way, though, if your motherboard has a BIOS with the appropriate fan profile settings. Many also allow you to follow something besides CPU temperature so it won't pulse up and down so much...like VRM temperature for instance. The VRM also gets hotter as the CPU works harder but much more slowly so the fans won't pulse up and down.
 
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Could some one please point me in the right direction please. I basically just want the CPU (Ryzen 7 2700x) to run at 3700mhz continuously along with the aio cooler to run at max speed. I've disabled Q fan control, disabled CPU boost also in the bios but my CPU speed is still up and down like a yo-yo! Same with the aio pump and fan. I thought with the CPU turbo boost disabled it wouldn't turbo boost but it's still boosting way beyond 4ghz. With the machine sitting idle the CPU clock is constantly bouncing between 2400mhz and 4200mhz.

Any help would be appreciated thanks.
If you want to sacrifice performance just set CPU multiplier to 37 and CPU voltage to about 1.2v.
 

BogdanH

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I basically just want the CPU (Ryzen 7 2700x) to run at 3700mhz continuously
What you want to achieve makes no sense. It's like driving a car with cruise control (tempomat) set at 60km/h and say "I wish to drive whole route at exactly that speed" (and forgetting there are other cars on road).
CPU is smarter than that.. if there's no work, core goes to sleep and if something is needed to be done, it will try to make it fast (so other tasks don't need to wait long).

If you wish your CPU to use less power (to keep it cooler), the simplest solution is by using one of "Eco mode" in your BIOS.
 
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Amddefector

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What motherboard do you have?

It's normal for Ryzen processors to increase and decrease clocks in use. It's the way they work to use less energy on average by providing peak performance only when it's needed. You can set a fixed clock speed to stop it but it probably won't make the fans stop surging as they follow the processor temperature. That also ramps up and down with processing loads as they come and go even with a fixed clock speed.

The real fix is to set a custom fan profile for your fans...look in your motherboard BIOS for how you do that. Another way if you don't want to work in BIOS is buy some adapters to connect your fans directly to a SATA power cable and they will run at full speed all the time. That's the bad way, though, if your motherboard has a BIOS with the appropriate fan profile settings. Many also allow you to follow something besides CPU temperature so it won't pulse up and down so much...like VRM temperature for instance. The VRM also gets hotter as the CPU works harder but much more slowly so the fans won't pulse up and down.
Hi thanks for the reply. I should have explained in better detail. I have a Asus Rog strix b450f mb. The main problem is during gameplay, the games keep hanging for several seconds at the same time the CPU or radiator fan speeds up. I'm guessing where the CPU is reaching its temperature limit and lowers the clock speed. Does this sound correct? So what I basically wanted to do was disable the turbo boost so the CPU would run at is default clock of 3700mhz. And run the fans at full so it would just hold a temp of around 60 degrees. I managed to disable the Asus oc profile which was causing another issue with over voltage the CPU way above 1.5v and putting it dangerously above 200w. This has lowered the CPU temp to around 55 degrees under load but I'm still getting the hanging in games when the fan duty cycle is increased.
 
Hi thanks for the reply. I should have explained in better detail. I have a Asus Rog strix b450f mb. The main problem is during gameplay, the games keep hanging for several seconds at the same time the CPU or radiator fan speeds up. I'm guessing where the CPU is reaching its temperature limit and lowers the clock speed. Does this sound correct? So what I basically wanted to do was disable the turbo boost so the CPU would run at is default clock of 3700mhz. And run the fans at full so it would just hold a temp of around 60 degrees. I managed to disable the Asus oc profile which was causing another issue with over voltage the CPU way above 1.5v and putting it dangerously above 200w. This has lowered the CPU temp to around 55 degrees under load but I'm still getting the hanging in games when the fan duty cycle is increased.
I'd suggest running default settings in BIOS for the CPU, no 'ASUS OC' settings at all. Just do a CMOS reset to get started as you should have done it when you first built it and probably did not. After the reset, leave clocks on AUTO and voltage on AUTO. Only BIOS CPU settings to change for now would be to set Cool-n-Quiet, Global C States, Processor CPPC and CPPC Preferred Cores to enabled as some BIOS' interpret AUTO and DEFAULT settings as DISABLED. And of course enable XMP (or DOCP for Asus) for your memory.

EDIT: actually, just noticed you have a 2700X CPU and I believe CPPC came in with Zen 2. So don't be dismayed if you don't find those settings in your BIOS

If you've installed an Asus motherboard app uninstall it as it's probably just be messing things up for you. Install the AMD chipset drivers...get them from the AMD support site... and use the Ryzen balanced power plan, don't change it. You might also check any other apps you have running while gaming and uninstall them for now.

If you lock the clocks at the CPU's base clock speed...3700...it won't help with hanging; if anything it will severely hurt game performance because it couldn't boost when it needs to. You can't keep the processor from spiking temperature as it boosts; it's inherent in the design of how Ryzen CPU's work. It will also spike voltage up to around 1.5V, which is also normal. AMD's told us it's designed to do that so don't worry.

But once you get everything set up (as above) check that it stops the hesitation in the game. If it still is you have something else going on and probably should address that then. If it stops you can lower VCore voltage a little by using offsets only...but do it a little at a time. It's easy to hurt gaming performance and/or make it go unstable by lowering too much.
 
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Hi thanks for the reply. I should have explained in better detail. I have a Asus Rog strix b450f mb. The main problem is during gameplay, the games keep hanging for several seconds at the same time the CPU or radiator fan speeds up. I'm guessing where the CPU is reaching its temperature limit and lowers the clock speed. Does this sound correct? So what I basically wanted to do was disable the turbo boost so the CPU would run at is default clock of 3700mhz. And run the fans at full so it would just hold a temp of around 60 degrees. I managed to disable the Asus oc profile which was causing another issue with over voltage the CPU way above 1.5v and putting it dangerously above 200w. This has lowered the CPU temp to around 55 degrees under load but I'm still getting the hanging in games when the fan duty cycle is increased.
Those are symptoms , not a reason. You can't cure it by lowering performance, it might even cause more problems. For Ryzen of that generation temps between 65-70c are not going to lower the boost at any voltage.
 

Amddefector

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I'd suggest running default settings in BIOS for the CPU, no 'ASUS OC' settings at all. Just do a CMOS reset to get started as you should have done it when you first built it and probably did not. After the reset, leave clocks on AUTO and voltage on AUTO. Only BIOS CPU settings to change for now would be to set Cool-n-Quiet, Global C States, Processor CPPC and CPPC Preferred Cores to enabled as some BIOS' interpret AUTO and DEFAULT settings as DISABLED. And of course enable XMP (or DOCP for Asus) for your memory.

EDIT: actually, just noticed you have a 2700X CPU and I believe CPPC came in with Zen 2. So don't be dismayed if you don't find those settings in your BIOS

If you've installed an Asus motherboard app uninstall it as it's probably just be messing things up for you. Install the AMD chipset drivers...get them from the AMD support site... and use the Ryzen balanced power plan, don't change it. You might also check any other apps you have running while gaming and uninstall them for now.

If you lock the clocks at the CPU's base clock speed...3700...it won't help with hanging; if anything it will severely hurt game performance because it couldn't boost when it needs to. You can't keep the processor from spiking temperature as it boosts; it's inherent in the design of how Ryzen CPU's work. It will also spike voltage up to around 1.5V, which is also normal. AMD's told us it's designed to do that so don't worry.

But once you get everything set up (as above) check that it stops the hesitation in the game. If it still is you have something else going on and probably should address that then. If it stops you can lower VCore voltage a little by using offsets only...but do it a little at a time. It's easy to hurt gaming performance and/or make it go unstable by lowering too much.
Ok thanks. As soon as the kids are off it I'll have a look at those settings.
Thank you.
 

Amddefector

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Those are symptoms , not a reason. You can't cure it by lowering performance, it might even cause more problems. For Ryzen of that generation temps between 65-70c are not going to lower the boost at any voltage.
I'm just trying to figure out why the game keeps hanging at exactly the same time the fan speed increases. Surely it's not a coincidence that the game hangs every time the fan speed increases? Something somewhere must be changing something to cause this. Im not familiar with all these bios power management settings, that's why when I installed the CPU and left all the bios settings at default it was cranking my CPU up way past it's safe power settings. I.e core voltage was going up to 1.6v CPU power draw was sometimes going way beyond 200w. I just assumed that bios default values was a safe option but obviously I was wrong in this case.
 
I'm just trying to figure out why the game keeps hanging at exactly the same time the fan speed increases. Surely it's not a coincidence that the game hangs every time the fan speed increases? Something somewhere must be changing something to cause this. Im not familiar with all these bios power management settings, that's why when I installed the CPU and left all the bios settings at default it was cranking my CPU up way past it's safe power settings. I.e core voltage was going up to 1.6v CPU power draw was sometimes going way beyond 200w. I just assumed that bios default values was a safe option but obviously I was wrong in this case.
Which MB and AIO cooler? Most simple AIO coolers need pump to be connected to AIO_Pump header or to a header that gives steady 12v and run full speed. Fan(s) to connect to CPU_FAN header so it's speed can be tied to CPU temperature. BIOS should also provide possibility to set fan speed manually. That way you can be assured that cooler is working at full capacity.
Another thing to check for is availability of latest BIOS version, Ryzen systems have gone thru many changes since inceptions and many problems solved. 1.6v is just way too high, AMD allows for no more than 1.5v but some normal voltage for that CPU at let's say 4.2GHz should go no more than 1.3v at most.
There are couple of ways to regulate voltage, One is to set voltage manually and other to set negative voltage offset. Most Ryzen will tolerate -0.05 -0.1v negative voltage offset.
You can also regulate CPU frequency with Power saving plan in windows. If you set maximum processor state to less than 100% it shouldn't boost over it's base clock frequency.
 

hotaru.hino

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If you have a B or X series board, then locking the CPU speed is basically going into the UEFI config and setting the CPU multiplier to 37.

You may also want to tweak with the voltage. I was able to get my 2700X down to about 1.0V on 3.7GHz, but yours may need more to be stable or be fine with less.
 

Amddefector

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I'd suggest running default settings in BIOS for the CPU, no 'ASUS OC' settings at all. Just do a CMOS reset to get started as you should have done it when you first built it and probably did not. After the reset, leave clocks on AUTO and voltage on AUTO. Only BIOS CPU settings to change for now would be to set Cool-n-Quiet, Global C States, Processor CPPC and CPPC Preferred Cores to enabled as some BIOS' interpret AUTO and DEFAULT settings as DISABLED. And of course enable XMP (or DOCP for Asus) for your memory.

EDIT: actually, just noticed you have a 2700X CPU and I believe CPPC came in with Zen 2. So don't be dismayed if you don't find those settings in your BIOS

If you've installed an Asus motherboard app uninstall it as it's probably just be messing things up for you. Install the AMD chipset drivers...get them from the AMD support site... and use the Ryzen balanced power plan, don't change it. You might also check any other apps you have running while gaming and uninstall them for now.

If you lock the clocks at the CPU's base clock speed...3700...it won't help with hanging; if anything it will severely hurt game performance because it couldn't boost when it needs to. You can't keep the processor from spiking temperature as it boosts; it's inherent in the design of how Ryzen CPU's work. It will also spike voltage up to around 1.5V, which is also normal. AMD's told us it's designed to do that so don't worry.

But once you get everything set up (as above) check that it stops the hesitation in the game. If it still is you have something else going on and probably should address that then. If it stops you can lower VCore voltage a little by using offsets only...but do it a little at a time. It's easy to hurt gaming performance and/or make it go unstable by lowering too much.
Hi. I have loaded optimised bios values as I did when I first installed the CPU, there is no default option though. The Asus ai tuner doesn't seem to have a disabled option! It only has auto or manual so I've left it on auto. There was another option to do with CPU overclock offset which I set to 0mhz.
I found docp which I've enabled but I've had to underclock my ram further as it kept failing post. Its native is 3600 but I had it running stable at 3400 but now I've lowered it to 3333 and stable.
Cccp I couldn't find.

The game play is a lot better now thanks without the hanging.

Another thing I did was swap the cooling fan from the header next to the aio pump header which is what was recommended in the user manual (chassis's) fan header and plugged it into the CPU fan header. Instantly got a warning message at post saying cpu fan speed failure? In the bios if I set it to monitor CPU fan it does actually show the fan rpm but i couldn't get past post screen warning. I tried DC and pwm mode but kept getting the same error so I set it to ignore and now the fan just runs at full speed which isn't a problem.

Thanks again.
 
Hi. I have loaded optimised bios values as I did when I first installed the CPU, there is no default option though. The Asus ai tuner doesn't seem to have a disabled option! It only has auto or manual so I've left it on auto. There was another option to do with CPU overclock offset which I set to 0mhz.
I found docp which I've enabled but I've had to underclock my ram further as it kept failing post. Its native is 3600 but I had it running stable at 3400 but now I've lowered it to 3333 and stable.
Cccp I couldn't find.

The game play is a lot better now thanks without the hanging.

Another thing I did was swap the cooling fan from the header next to the aio pump header which is what was recommended in the user manual (chassis's) fan header and plugged it into the CPU fan header. Instantly got a warning message at post saying cpu fan speed failure? In the bios if I set it to monitor CPU fan it does actually show the fan rpm but i couldn't get past post screen warning. I tried DC and pwm mode but kept getting the same error so I set it to ignore and now the fan just runs at full speed which isn't a problem.

Thanks again.
3600 is a fairly extreme overclock, you might try increasing DIMM voltage to see if it will start there. It's not uncommon and DDR4 DRAM is safe up to 1.5V...although it's not recommended to run 24/7 at more than 1.4V; 1.45V if you know you have Samsung 'B' die DRAM.

I'm not really sure where to find the Processor CCP settings on Asus BIOS. It's usually in an 'AMD Overclocking' or 'Advanced CPU' settings submenu but it may not be there at all for a Zen+ processor. If you must overclock you should use BIOS anyway.

I'd seriously consider simply un-installing that ASUS AI tuner app. Any such motherboard app's are nothing but trouble, in my experience. I can't be certain but I'd tend to blame that for inconsistent performance.

Many motherboards will alarm if they do not detect an operating fan on certain fan headers. You have to read in the manual about which ones. AIO pumps are usually operated at full voltage all the time so I'd think an AIO pump header would have no speed controls but be monitored in case of pump failure. CPU fan headers would too.

If it's alarming with your fans you might check to see if they're 4-wire PWM or 3-wire DC controlled. Much less common today are simple two-wire, with no RPM signal which means any such monitors would always alarm.
 
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Amddefector

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3600 is a fairly extreme overclock, you might try increasing DIMM voltage to see if it will start there. It's not uncommon and DDR4 DRAM is safe up to 1.5V...although it's not recommended to run 24/7 at more than 1.4V; 1.45V if you know you have Samsung 'B' die DRAM.

I'm not really sure where to find the Processor CCP settings on Asus BIOS. It's usually in an 'AMD Overclocking' or 'Advanced CPU' settings submenu but it may not be there at all for a Zen+ processor. If you must overclock you should use BIOS anyway.

I'd seriously consider simply un-installing that ASUS AI tuner app. Any such motherboard app's are nothing but trouble, in my experience. I can't be certain but I'd tend to blame that for inconsistent performance.

Many motherboards will alarm if they do not detect an operating fan on certain fan headers. You have to read in the manual about which ones. AIO pumps are usually operated at full voltage all the time so I'd think an AIO pump header would have no speed controls but be monitored in case of pump failure. CPU fan headers would too.

If it's alarming with your fans you might check to see if they're 4-wire PWM or 3-wire DC controlled. Much less common today are simple two-wire, with no RPM signal which means any such monitors would always alarm.
The ram is Corsair vengeance pro 3600 but some one pointed out in a previous post that my CPU won't run memory that fast but it would run @3400 but 3333 is fine by me.

I have no software installed for overclock, I only installed drivers for the motherboard and GPU and CPU. I installed Ryzen master just for monitoring purposes but have not set any kind of over clock with it. The Asus ai tuner is in the bios. But it seems fine with the current settings now. My CPU spiked to 200w earlier but that was across all cores. #1 being the highest at 120w and balanced evenly across the rest. CPU v core stayed below 1.5v.

According to the manual the aio pump should be connected to the aio header which it is and if I monitor pump speed it does fluctuate with the CPU temp. Like when the computer is idle the pump speed will drop and the CPU temp will rise to 40c then the pump will speed up and the temp drops to 35c but now the cooling fan is connected to CPU header my temp stays bang on 60c when gaming.

I can live with the fan not being monitored as I can see it all the time and I have the auto shutdown enabled for overheating. I've checked and it is a pwm fan 4 wire. From what I've read that warning is because the fan is 120mm and doesn't spin as fast as the bios would expect a CPU fan to spin apparently.

Thanks again.
 
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From what I've read that warning is because the fan is 120mm and doesn't spin as fast as the bios would expect a CPU fan to spin apparently.
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If that Asus utility's in BIOS then it's probably not an issue when not using any of it, so that's a good thing.

I think that's got to be wrong as there are a LOT of CPU coolers with 120mm fans; among the best being Noctua's NH-U12's but there are many others including the ubiquitous CM Hyper 212. That is, unless the fan is a chassis fan that spins at a super-slow 600-800RPM max. But if it is it could make sense as my mobo's BIOS spins up the fans at POST, probably to check RPM of those being monitored.

I really have to wonder about a 2700X pulling down 200W though; it just doesn't sound right at all even for momentary peak draw. Unless the CPU power reporting deviation is extreme, which it could be. It's just in the wrong direction...it not uncommon for mfr's to set up their boards to under-report it to trick the process to boost higher.
 
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Karadjgne

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Cpu_fan header is doubly monitored. It has normal operating ranges and also a low rpm monitor. If the fan ever drops below the stated minimum (usually 200rpm) the cpu will read that through the header, give you a warning, then start shutdown procedures.

General assumption is that the AIO_pump header has the same protection.

Ryzens boost on need. If you need 8 cores at max, it'll boost all 8 cores, tempered only by temps and voltage, upto the set power limits of the socket. If the program only requires 4 cores, the cpu will boost only 4. That boost will generally be higher since the socket has more power and less temp to deal with, extra wiggle room. With just a single core boost, you get the highest rated boost, but you will hit the power limits (amps) of the socket, so the vcore for that core alone will hit upto 1.6v temporarily. With an all core boost, the vcore is lower, the clock speeds are lower, but the socket power limit remains, which keeps temps regulated.

Use of PBO/XFR2 in Ryzen Master can change that power limit, increasing the available amperage limit, which allows possibly for higher boosts. And somewhat higher temps as a result, depending on the cooling ability.

Bios is not a minimum power state. It's closer to a 50% load. Any fans are controlled by bios and it's current settings for temps. It's only after booting into windows that loads will drop to 5% (idle) after the boot is fully finished, and as temps drop with clock speeds lowering, so do fan speeds.
 

Amddefector

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@drea.drechsler
According to the mobo manual when a aio pump is connected to the aio header the radiator fan should be connected to the chassis fan header next to the aio header. Maybe that's why it's giving me the warning because the bios is expecting the CPU/radiator fan to be connected to the chassis fan header and monitoring that instead of the CPU header? Even though I have the CPU fan set to ignore in the bios, it's still being monitored in windows via CPU info. The aio pump is monitored also.
@Karadjgne
The CPU power draw is normal then? I think I read it's rated at 130w but don't know if that's as the complete package or per core. When it draws 200w it's never more than 120w on a single core. And it only seems to be a spike, like if I monitor in graph mode it will spike a 200w for a second once or twice when gaming.

Thanks.
 
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When it draws 200w it's never more than 120w on a single core.
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You can connect any fan to the CPU_Fan header. Just so long as it's at least 3 wire, with an RPM readout, it has no way of knowing just where the fan's mounted.

120w on a single core...that's going to be darn close to 100 amps drawn by one single core of a 2700X CPU. Not very likely, even in short bursts, even if you've enabled PBO and tweaked it with EDC limits above 100A. It's not unrealistic for the entire CPU, with all 8 cores/16 threads working hard though.

IIRC, with PBO in default settings a 95W TDP processor PPT limit is something around 105W for the entire processor, not one single core. I have to think your power readings are seriously flawed and not to be trusted. A way to test for accuracy using HWInfo and it's Power Reporting Deviation readout:

First is set up the system fully stock: clocks and voltage both on AUTO, LLC either OFF, Auto or neutral settings.

Now run a heavy, realistic all-core workload, Cinebench r20 or r23 is recommended. Let it run in continuous rendering for several minutes while monitoring the Power Reporting Deviation readout in HWInfo. If it's more that 10% in deviation from 100% then the mobo mfr. has tweaked reporting excessively and it's not accurate. You can use the degree of deviation as a factor to adjust your readings with your preferred OC, but it's still not very accurate. Especially for current and therefore power.
 
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Could some one please point me in the right direction please. I basically just want the CPU (Ryzen 7 2700x) to run at 3700mhz continuously along with the aio cooler to run at max speed. I've disabled Q fan control, disabled CPU boost also in the bios but my CPU speed is still up and down like a yo-yo! Same with the aio pump and fan. I thought with the CPU turbo boost disabled it wouldn't turbo boost but it's still boosting way beyond 4ghz. With the machine sitting idle the CPU clock is constantly bouncing between 2400mhz and 4200mhz.

Any help would be appreciated thanks.
hi Amddefector
I have the same problem with my AMD A6 processor
have you found the correct solution for this problem?
 

Karadjgne

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Asus is usually pretty accurate. In default, they stick with intel/amd official recommended power limits. Where things get out of hand is the Auto OC, Asus optimized, power boost settings which aren't always fully explained.

Gigabyte so far has shown to be the worst offender at stretching power limits, to the point of ignoring Tau completely, which gives really good performance for the i9's, but instead of dropping back to 95w after 56 seconds, they remain at 200w + infinitely.

You can get away with a 120mm AIO with a 9900k, on an Asus board at default, just don't dare try it on a Gigabyte board.

Use F5 (normally) to reset the bios back to factory default settings. Save, reboot. In windows, run through any and every software application that has anything to do with changing bios settings. Any of the Asus digi or tpm stuff, auto OC, OC Genie, etc anything that could possibly alter voltages or cpu utilization. Shut it down if you need to from msconfig, task manager etc. Windows should be running and responding exactly as bios has stated.

Then run your tests, from a clean slate.
 

Amddefector

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Asus is usually pretty accurate. In default, they stick with intel/amd official recommended power limits. Where things get out of hand is the Auto OC, Asus optimized, power boost settings which aren't always fully explained.

Gigabyte so far has shown to be the worst offender at stretching power limits, to the point of ignoring Tau completely, which gives really good performance for the i9's, but instead of dropping back to 95w after 56 seconds, they remain at 200w + infinitely.

You can get away with a 120mm AIO with a 9900k, on an Asus board at default, just don't dare try it on a Gigabyte board.

Use F5 (normally) to reset the bios back to factory default settings. Save, reboot. In windows, run through any and every software application that has anything to do with changing bios settings. Any of the Asus digi or tpm stuff, auto OC, OC Genie, etc anything that could possibly alter voltages or cpu utilization. Shut it down if you need to from msconfig, task manager etc. Windows should be running and responding exactly as bios has stated.

Then run your tests, from a clean slate.
The main problem is that the oc suite is in the bios. It's got 2 options, auto or manual settings. No off or disabled option. This is called Asus ai tuner. I have nothing running in windows that can alter power settings. Apart from Windows it's self, which is currently set on high performance mode. But I will change this to Ryzen tuned performance option and see what happens. Next thing I guess will be to change the PSU

Thanks.
 
The main problem is that the oc suite is in the bios. It's got 2 options, auto or manual settings. No off or disabled option.
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Terms used in BIOS can often be confusing: in such cases 'auto' is usually the same as 'disabled'. They should have used 'disabled', or at least 'default', as better terms.

What makes you suspect the PSU? and to solve which problem, precisely?
 

Amddefector

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Terms used in BIOS can often be confusing: in such cases 'auto' is usually the same as 'disabled'. They should have used 'disabled', or at least 'default', as better terms.

What makes you suspect the PSU? and to solve which problem, precisely?
I don't suspect the PSU but a lot of people have said bad things about them although I did watch a few videos of them being thoroughly tested and the voltages were consistent. But I guess these kind of bad comments put doubts in your mind. It's not really a problem, just my rtx 3070 performance is not what I was expecting although I do game on a 43" 4k display it's not a lot better than the 2060s I had previously. That and the CPU power spike I just guessed it could be PSU related. I have monitored the voltages under load and even when the GPU is pulling 240w the voltages all stay normal. Guess I'm just clutching at straws now. The psu is a aerocool integrator 750w bronze. I did buy a Corsair psu previously but it only had 1 8 pin pcie which was ok for the 2060 but no good for the 3070.
 

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