Question Anyone using prefer maximum performance Nvidia control panel?

Vtec 9000

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Hello, I'm sure this has been already asked, however I can't find the answer.

Do you use "prefer maximum performance" in the Nvidia control panel when overclocking your card?

I'm getting lower scores with it set to that.

I'm using an Asus tuf rtx 3080ti, power limits set to max (107%) temps are 64°C max on the core and 80°C on the memory.

What are you using or share your settings please?
 

Vtec 9000

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I don't. I believe the setting just prevents the video card from going down to idling speeds.
Thanks for replying, I've just watched numerous overclocking guides and they all seem to set it to prefer maximum performance, my GPU clocks fluctuate so much though, using the setting or not. Just wonder if there's a use case scenario for it as it appears to not improve performance?
 
Thanks for replying, I've just watched numerous overclocking guides and they all seem to set it to prefer maximum performance, my GPU clocks fluctuate so much though, using the setting or not. Just wonder if there's a use case scenario for it as it appears to not improve performance?
When the clocks fluctuate is important. It's normal for GPUs to downclock to hundreds of MHz when there's nothing going on (Mine goes down to like 300 MHz) because it's a power saving feature.

As for when it's useful, it's explained in https://nvidia.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/3130/~/setting-power-management-mode-from-adaptive-to-maximum-performance

Setting Power management mode from "Adaptive" to "Maximum Performance" can improve performance in certain applications when the GPU is throttling the clock speeds incorrectly resulting in low fps.
 
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You might try underclocking your GPU sounds dumb I know but my scores in superposition were 200-300 higher when doing that. And yes I used prefer max performance On all tests.
 
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Karadjgne

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Overclocking guides are useless. They only apply to specific things, not a general use case.

If you OC your card to 107% power limit, then play Amazon's New World, you'll cook your card if it doesn't immediately throttle down as power limits will see North of 120%. Even a 100% power limit set on the card shows averages closer to 107%-109%. And that's not the only game that does that, but is a more extreme case.

Setting max power limits increases voltages and amperage (ie Power) and often that will be detrimental to Gpu Boost as temps will throttle performance.

I'd use TimeSpy to test the card, starting with max power limit, then start dropping it slowly and testing in between. If scores maintain, or go up, keep dropping power limit until you peak out and scores start dropping. If they immediately drop, power limit isn't the issue, something else is holding the card and you aren't seeing maximum applicable Boost, which could be gpu temps, airflow, memory clocks, gpu voltage etc.

The guides are a guide, a tool, not Gospel or Canon, and don't necessarily work the same on different cards.
 

Vtec 9000

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When the clocks fluctuate is important. It's normal for GPUs to downclock to hundreds of MHz when there's nothing going on (Mine goes down to like 300 MHz) because it's a power saving feature.

As for when it's useful, it's explained in https://nvidia.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/3130/~/setting-power-management-mode-from-adaptive-to-maximum-performance
Again, thank you for the response. Sorry for sounding stupid, but during heavy loads like port royal, when the GPU usage is pegged at 100% and my temps look fine using HWinfo64.
Why does the card not maintain a higher boost clock? Mine sits around 1890mhz. If the power limits and temperatures are ok why is the card not hitting say 2000mhz? I'm assuming there's something I'm not taking into consideration or the way the boost technology works?
 

Vtec 9000

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You might try underclocking your GPU sounds dumb I know but my scores in superposition were 200-300 higher when doing that. And yes I used prefer max performance On all tests.
Yes so many people are under clocking the card, but I feel like I'm not releasing the cards full potential especially when my temps are ok?
 

Vtec 9000

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Overclocking guides are useless. They only apply to specific things, not a general use case.

If you OC your card to 107% power limit, then play Amazon's New World, you'll cook your card if it doesn't immediately throttle down as power limits will see North of 120%. Even a 100% power limit set on the card shows averages closer to 107%-109%. And that's not the only game that does that, but is a more extreme case.

Setting max power limits increases voltages and amperage (ie Power) and often that will be detrimental to Gpu Boost as temps will throttle performance.

I'd use TimeSpy to test the card, starting with max power limit, then start dropping it slowly and testing in between. If scores maintain, or go up, keep dropping power limit until you peak out and scores start dropping. If they immediately drop, power limit isn't the issue, something else is holding the card and you aren't seeing maximum applicable Boost, which could be gpu temps, airflow, memory clocks, gpu voltage etc.

The guides are a guide, a tool, not Gospel or Canon, and don't necessarily work the same on different cards.
Thank you for replying, I appreciate you taking the time. I've never heard of dropped the power limits like that but I can try it and see if my scores change, I like the idea of getting the most from my card, especially when my temps seem so good.

The 3090 I owned memory temps were hitting 110°C from a run on heaven benchmark, so I returned the card. This card is maxing out around 82°C, which makes me think that gives me wiggle room to over clock the card alittle.

Perhaps if I keep my current overclock +125 core/+750 memory and like you did, drag the slider for the power limit down to see when a change in scores happens, thanks for this info.
 

Vtec 9000

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You might try underclocking your GPU sounds dumb I know but my scores in superposition were 200-300 higher when doing that. And yes I used prefer max performance On all tests.
When you under clock your card, do you enter for example a -250 on the core, apply that, open the curve editor and again for example pick 850mv and drag it up to whatever you want your clocks at? Eg 1800mhz?

I've heard mixed reports that applying a -250 to the core is not the proper way to undervolt?

Again I'm just using "expert" guides on YouTube.
 

Phaaze88

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@Vtec 9000
The Gpu Boost algorithm is a key to all this. It already automatically and dynamically OCs the gpu core clock beyond the base. [Can't forget the factory OC from Asus added on top.]
There are several boost curves that it will switch between based on core operating temperature and how frequently the board power limit is reached/passed.
The cooler the core runs, and the less frequently the BPL is crossed, the longer the gpu sustains its best curves. [To my knowledge, hot spot and memory junction do not function the same way - don't affect performance until their thermal limits are hit.]
The answer is not moar power, because of the BPL and power = heat.
 
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Vtec 9000

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@Vtec 9000
The Gpu Boost algorithm is a key to all this. It already automatically and dynamically OCs the gpu core clock beyond the base. [Can't forget the factory OC from Asus added on top.]
There are several boost curves that it will switch between based on core operating temperature and how frequently the board power limit is reached/passed.
The cooler the core runs, and the less frequently the BPL is crossed, the longer the gpu sustains its best curves. [To my knowledge, hot spot and memory junction do not function the same way - don't affect performance until their thermal limits are hit.]
The answer is not moar power, because of the BPL and power = heat.
Thanks for the response. Stupid question, but when you say BPL, is that board power limit? What's your advice? Just leave everything default?

I don't feel the need to undervolt as I'm only seeing temps under 65°C on the core and 82°C on the memory junction.

I enjoy the tinkering, however if it gives me worse results I would be better leaving everything at default and letting the GPU do it's thing.
 

Phaaze88

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Stupid question, but when you say BPL, is that board power limit? What's your advice? Just leave everything default?
Aye, Board Power Limit.
Experiment with the power limit as suggested by Karadjgne, or undervolt.
If you have the patience for it, I'd suggest giving it a try.

I don't feel the need to undervolt as I'm only seeing temps under 65°C on the core...
I wouldn't go that far... unlike the single power limit, there are several temperature thresholds - cooler is better...

I enjoy the tinkering, however if it gives me worse results I would be better leaving everything at default and letting the GPU do it's thing.
These things - cpu and gpu - always utilize more voltage than they actually need(gpu power limits are already conservative as is), but it's done that way to guarantee stability as the product is advertised. There's also the wild card that is silicon lottery.
 
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Karadjgne

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Boost clocks are an OC, by the factory, so there's no guarantee of any one particular speed. You'll see boosting upto a certain amount but that's governed by multiple things, not just temps in one area like memory, but also the gpu, the gpu voltages, VRM's, power limits, etc. The clocks will stop boosting up when some component reaches what the card considers its max tolerance. So even if temps are good in the nemory, voltages might be high on the gpu or in the VRM's or you might have hit physical limits in the caps or inductors etc.

With that in mind, maxing out power limits can be detrimental to performance because now power isn't as much a limited factor, which can stress other components, allow too much amperage or voltage use, create more heat, which raises resistances in inductors etc. You'll get more out of moderation across everything than pushing maximums in some things.

Strongest man in the world can't lift much while balancing on one leg, yet a kid with half his strength standing on two feet, will lift more than he can.
 
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Vtec 9000

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Boost clocks are an OC, by the factory, so there's no guarantee of any one particular speed. You'll see boosting upto a certain amount but that's governed by multiple things, not just temps in one area like memory, but also the gpu, the gpu voltages, VRM's, power limits, etc. The clocks will stop boosting up when some component reaches what the card considers its max tolerance. So even if temps are good in the nemory, voltages might be high on the gpu or in the VRM's or you might have hit physical limits in the caps or inductors etc.

With that in mind, maxing out power limits can be detrimental to performance because now power isn't as much a limited factor, which can stress other components, allow too much amperage or voltage use, create more heat, which raises resistances in inductors etc. You'll get more out of moderation across everything than pushing maximums in some things.

Strongest man in the world can't lift much while balancing on one leg, yet a kid with half his strength standing on two feet, will lift more than he can.
Some good advice there, thank you.

Im going to leave stock clocks on both core and memory, and reducing the power limit is something worth trying.

maybe even try an undervolt.

There's a "silent mode" in the Asus OC tweaker 3, which drops the clocks and power limit for me.

I can get a little carried away when it comes to pushing the limits and benchmarks, to see what score I can get, forgetting that it's already a great card right out of the box and just enjoying it! Lol.
 
I push most everything to the max and then back off slightly.
I use prefer maximum performance on all my folding cards.
I also force multi-threaded driver optimization.
Folding uses the shaders for its calculations and very little else.
Except the CPU feeding it.
All seem to top out arround 100mhz of each other depending on workload. Except the 960ftw 4 gig runs stock.
GTX 1060 6GB gamer
GTX 1070 SC
RTX 3060 TI FE
All overclock/boost to 1980-2070 mhz.
 

Karadjgne

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I OC'd the snot out of my Asus gtx970 strix. Had it to a 128% OC. The Samsung memory would top out just shy of 8k, I could (back then) push a 125% power limit using Asus Gpu Tweak. Added 400MHz? To the boost clocks. Individually. Put together, total instability which started at 111%-113% power limit and anything above 115%.
Dropping the memory to 7916 from 7996, keeping the boost, but setting 114% power limit with 0mv added hit a sweet spot. Any deviation, instant instability. But at that OC it was perfectly stable for over 6 years.

In all the years I've played with OC, starting back with my old Pentium II-350MHz, one thing I've found for certain. Max never works except for benchmarks. Finding the right balance, improving performance and it working as it should, is far more important.
 
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When you under clock your card, do you enter for example a -250 on the core, apply that, open the curve editor and again for example pick 850mv and drag it up to whatever you want your clocks at? Eg 1800mhz?

I've heard mixed reports that applying a -250 to the core is not the proper way to undervolt?

Again I'm just using "expert" guides on YouTube.
are you using msi afterburner for the OC.
 

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