ASRock Debuts AM4 Motherboards With 5 Gigabit LAN

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erekp

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Very likely so, Valeman2012, as if it becomes 1000 Gigabits, it would be called a Terabit NIC!!!
 

derekullo

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You could buy 5 - 1 gigabit connections and bond them together for an effective 5 gigabits of pure unadulterated speed, although for that price you might as well go for a 10 or 40 gigabit nic/router and the necessary fiber optic cabling.

Can't wait for 10 gigabit over copper.
 

josejones

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Why no mention of the version of DisplayPort and HDMI? I expected the new AM4 to have Display Port 1.4 and HDMI 2.0. I hope they have support for the latest NVMe specs.
 

wifiburger

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hum.. strange there's no switches / routers past 1g, i guess you can always cross over between two computers and push 5g , although big hardrivers don't go that fast anyways
 

CyranD

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JOSEJONES, Ryzen processors don't have integrated graphics so I not sure Z270 Motherboards have graphics ports on them. A interesting question through is will Z270 support Bristle Ridge/Raven Ridge processors. Same socket but will it be limited to lower chipsets? Will it be up to each manufacturer whether they create bios that support them or not?
 

panathas

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Seems strange that they are still using PCIe 2.0 slots, since this is supposed to be a new modern high-end chipset. Intel has moved to PCIe 3 only slots for the last 2 generations. At least they have 2 m2 slots for SSDs but it's a same that you can't use a PCIe add-in card SSD on those new boards. I just hope that these new chipsets aren't crippled in any other way. Come on AMD, Intel is killing us price-wise and its current mainstream solutions are intentionally crippled in the internal connectivity department.
 

Xajel

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I hope more manufacturers adopt this, most companies didn't show every detail and every thing, so exact spec. are not there and some like ASUS only showed one mid-range mobo.. So there's actually a chance it already have things to cover later...

I think they aim to reveal everything along with actual Ryzen launch... hopefully by mid February...




I think you mean X370 chipset not Z270 :)

The new AM4 and all new chipsets does support Bristle Ridge & Raven Ridge APU's so yes These mobo's must have graphics output: DP, HDMI or whatever...
 

JonDol

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This is pathetic: I'm waiting for more than a decade to see 10 Gbit into the mainstream MB and they timidly start with 2.5 and 5 Gbit, 15 years after the 10 Gbit standard was approved...
 

Xajel

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The main issue for 10gb was and still the cost, PHY & cable requirement are just costly, new technologies usually starts and evolve in business and enterprise environments where high profit margin drive more developments and more manufacturing which result into lowering the prices... 10gb over copper was good, but the cost of adopting it over existing network was just high, small business will see it hard to justify replacing their cables with cat6 ( which was very expensive at that time, and they still are specially when going for anything above normal UTP ), and medium to large and bigger business see's it's more economical to jump to optical all together duo to closer price and longer length allowed... PHY's costs also still a problem.. just see how much current 10gb switches costs.. even home consumers versions ( like ASUS switch ) are just too expensive...

2.5gb & 5.0gb solved the main issue with the cables, so any business or home owner does not need to replace cables, even cat 5e can work with these speeds... so products might come more expensive in the beginning as with any new tech. but they won't be as expensive as 10gb.. and prices will go lower faster than 10gb...
 

James5mith

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How is CAT6 an impediment to adoption? My house is run with CAT6, every patch cable that I purchase is CAT6.

Why is this considered a massive barrier to entry? Monoprice exists. Wires are cheap. The most expensive things at this point are the damn switches. It's cheaper to get 56Gb Infiniband equipment than 10GbE equipment, and that's kind of insane.
 

Pompompaihn

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Ah, right, because your house is wired with CAT6 it must mean that it's a simple process for every building and business built in the last 20 years to upgrade their wiring. My workplace is a 80 year old building that they needed to drill through 20" of concrete topped with marble to run the existing Cat5e cabling 15 years ago, I'll just put in a small purchase order to get that redone.....
 

dgingeri

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10Gb is readily available and now fairly cheap: https://www.amazon.com/D-Link-Systems-SmartPro-Stackable-DGS-1510-28X/dp/B00MCZNW5G/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1484060338&sr=8-2&keywords=dlink+dgs+1510
https://www.amazon.com/10Gtek-82599ES-Ethernet-Converged-X520-DA2/dp/B01DCZCA3O/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1484060376&sr=8-1-spons&keywords=intel+x520&psc=1
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00VUUIA2E/ref=twister_B01BV59VB6?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

Sure, it's not 1Gb cheap, but it is not far off from what 1G cost back in 2004-2006.

In reality, we've had 2.5Gb Ethernet for years. It actually started with 10Gb overe CX4. CX4 NICs used 4 channels at 2.5Gb bonded together at the hardware level. Both Intel and Broadcom had 2.5Gb NIC chips, over cat5, back in 2007, and Broadcom had a 2.5Gb switch chip at the same time. Nobody was willing to actually build switches for it. Most industry insiders expected 10Gb to drop in price faster than it did, and render 2.5Gb useless. They were wrong. We've been cheated out of 2.5Gb for almost a decade because of stupid people. Now they're going to do the same with 5Gb, because nobody has any plans on producing switches for it.

Might as well go for the 10Gb now.
 

dgingeri

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link aggregation doesn't work that way, though. If you software bond 5 ports together, you can get 5 outgoing streams at 1Gb, but no one stream could do more than 1Gb. Plus, incoming traffic would be limited to just 1 NIC. If you use LACP, which requires a more expensive switch than 10G, while it would allow 5 1Gb streams incoming, you're still limited to 1Gb per stream in either direction. It's not "pure, unadulterated speed" in any case.

10Gb started with copper: the CX4 connector, which was limited to 10m cable lengths. Now, we can even use SFP+ cables, but the interaction between NICs and switches over those cables is iffy at best, plus cable lengths are limited to 3m for passive cables and 10m for active cables. We do now have 10Gbase-T, which allows 10G speeds over cat6a or cat7 cables at up to 100m, but they're power hungry.

10Gb still works best over optical, but that's not a bad thing. The cables are far more durable than they used to be, and not 10Gb SFP+ modules can be had for $20 and 3m cables for $11. The switches have even come down quite a bit. I've found switches with 2 10G ports available for as low as $200, and 4 ports for $400. I just got a 28 port switch with 4 of those ports being 10Gb SFP+ ports, the Dlink DGS-1510-28X, for $400. The SFP+ modules were $20 more each. It's not nearly as noisy as they claim, either. My system is noisier because of my Corsair H110GTX cooler.
 

hannibal

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The problem with 2.5 and 5 is that they may newer become popular and people move directly to 10... And that means sooner or later they are cheaper than those slover options.
 


10 Gigabit over Cat-6 cable has only been a standard for around 10 years. And of course, 10 years ago, you likely had a hard drive that couldn't even saturate a 1 Gbit connection, let alone 10 Gbits. Even today, most people continue to use hard disk drives for bulk storage, and their performance hasn't improved all that much, only being around twice as fast as they were then. Under a best case scenario, a modern disk drive might potentially allow for slightly higher bulk transfer speeds than what a 1 Gbit network connection can handle, but it's not going to even come close to what a 2.5 Gbit network is capable of. Of course, SSDs are becoming fairly common now, though they're still not exactly a cost-effective solution for multiple gigabytes of bulk data storage.

So, this comes back to why you haven't seen mainstream motherboards supporting 10 Gbit Ethernet. Few people have had a bulk storage solution fast enough to take advantage of more than what regular Gigabit Ethernet can offer, so it would have largely been a waste putting that feature on boards. Putting a costly feature that very few people will have need for on a motherboard for would just raise the price of the board for everyone.
 

somebodyspecial

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It's going to be tough to sell me a new board/cpu if I'm looking at forced win10 adoption to get it to work as designed. AMD would be wise to write a driver and tell MSFT to piss off on this issue. I'm certain they've already done it just in case all cpu sales/board sales cease a few days after launch ;) I can't wait for Vulkan to give me more gaming options that will lessen the sting of me leaving windows possibly at some point. Telemetry, desktop trying to run like a mobile device etc etc. No thanks. Thankfully a new gpu/monitor doesn't care what OS I have. If AMD wants my money, make it work FULLY in win7. I'm guessing it will work fully already in some form of *nix, so maybe this is my last WINTEL PC anyway.
 
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