News ASRock Z790 and H770 Motherboards Will Support Both DDR4 and DDR5

While I think it's great that Intel will keep DDR4 support with the new chipset and Raptor Lake (well, they kind of have to since, theoretically you can drop it in the current 600-series), it's kind of a doubled edged sword. Why? Well, Zen4/Ry7K will use DDR5 exclusively and we all know Alder Lake does lose a bit of performance when using DDR4 instead of DDR5, specially in games. So this will be an interesting conundrum for Intel. I mean, most consumers will benefit from this and I like that as I said, but I still find interesting the potential problem Raptor Lake will face. How ironic that now Intel's backward support may be used against it in fighting for the top. Well, I'm guessing most reviewers will just use DDR5 only for RL/13K and Zen4/Ry7K, then compare to DDR4. Man, they'll have a fun time testing Intel systems twice, lol.

Regards.
 

King_V

Illustrious
Ambassador
and we all know Alder Lake does lose a bit of performance when using DDR4 instead of DDR5
You have this backwards. Well, unless you're talking DDR5-6000, and, other than people with more money than sense, nobody is going to pay that much extra for high-end DDR5 to get maybe 1-2 fps gain over DDR4-3200 / DDR4-3600.

That's probably why they're doing it. Once AMD moves to DDR5 exclusively, Intel may be able to use DDR4 to undercut them on total system price. Unless DDR5 is more widely available at that time, and/or AMD reaps better benefits from DDR5 than Intel did (that last bit's a little speculation on my part, though)
 

DRagor

Illustrious
It makes upgrade cheaper for anyone who has decent ddr4 in current build - you need just mobo and CPU. True, you lose some performance, but especially at budget builds that's acceptable tradeoff.
 
You have this backwards. Well, unless you're talking DDR5-6000, and, other than people with more money than sense, nobody is going to pay that much extra for high-end DDR5 to get maybe 1-2 fps gain over DDR4-3200 / DDR4-3600.

That's probably why they're doing it. Once AMD moves to DDR5 exclusively, Intel may be able to use DDR4 to undercut them on total system price. Unless DDR5 is more widely available at that time, and/or AMD reaps better benefits from DDR5 than Intel did (that last bit's a little speculation on my part, though)
Keep in mind the margin will widen a lot in less than a year when new DDR5 speeds come out. Buildzoid and der8auer have been constantly OC'ing DDR5 memory modules with stupid good results in Alder Lake, so I'm taking it from that perspective. I don't want to sound dismissive, but when they're gunning for "top dog", then every percentage matters to both camps, so "value" becomes irrelevant.

Regards.
 

Why_Me

Glorious
While I think it's great that Intel will keep DDR4 support with the new chipset and Raptor Lake (well, they kind of have to since, theoretically you can drop it in the current 600-series), it's kind of a doubled edged sword. Why? Well, Zen4/Ry7K will use DDR5 exclusively and we all know Alder Lake does lose a bit of performance when using DDR4 instead of DDR5, specially in games. So this will be an interesting conundrum for Intel. I mean, most consumers will benefit from this and I like that as I said, but I still find interesting the potential problem Raptor Lake will face. How ironic that now Intel's backward support may be used against it in fighting for the top. Well, I'm guessing most reviewers will just use DDR5 only for RL/13K and Zen4/Ry7K, then compare to DDR4. Man, they'll have a fun time testing Intel systems twice, lol.

Regards.
Unlike AMD, Intel will offer consumers choices ... which is a good thing.
 

King_V

Illustrious
Ambassador
Keep in mind the margin will widen a lot in less than a year when new DDR5 speeds come out. Buildzoid and der8auer have been constantly OC'ing DDR5 memory modules with stupid good results in Alder Lake, so I'm taking it from that perspective. I don't want to sound dismissive, but when they're gunning for "top dog", then every percentage matters to both camps, so "value" becomes irrelevant.

Regards.
While that's true, that's a tiny percentage of the market. I don't believe that super-fast speeds of DDR5 (say 6600MHz? Higher?) will be a commonplace thing in the next year or so. Could be wrong, though.
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
While that's true, that's a tiny percentage of the market. I don't believe that super-fast speeds of DDR5 (say 6600MHz? Higher?) will be a commonplace thing in the next year or so. Could be wrong, though.
6400MT/s on DDR5 will likely be market life equivalent to DDR4-3200: it'll take about three years to hit the performance-per-dollar sweet spot.
 
While that's true, that's a tiny percentage of the market. I don't believe that super-fast speeds of DDR5 (say 6600MHz? Higher?) will be a commonplace thing in the next year or so. Could be wrong, though.
I'm pretty sure these modules will become common place once AM5 launches, or at least before the end of the year.

Here's the latest example of how monstrous the performance jump is:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7yQUW4BHW0o


Regards.
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
Here's the latest example of how monstrous the performance jump is:
Monstrous performance jump in... GeekBench multi-threaded memory scores, one of the things that shows the most unrealistically exaggerated benefits from faster memory. In most real-world memory-intensive software, memory bandwidth scaling is typically less than half as good as synthetic benchmarks, between a quarter to a third as good for games.
 
Monstrous performance jump in... GeekBench multi-threaded memory scores, one of the things that shows the most unrealistically exaggerated benefits from faster memory. In most real-world memory-intensive software, memory bandwidth scaling is typically less than half as good as synthetic benchmarks, between a quarter to a third as good for games.
As I said: "latest". Not "only one".

EDIT: I guess I'll link the rest of the videos I remember and found?
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CtGXAZznKSc


View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zIPmtEJU-gs


View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mQVHlIS1lz0

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Y9S1wEtR3g


And there's plenty evidence out there that DDR5 with low timings is just faster than DDR4 with normal or even low timings. Currently, from what I can see in all the videos I've watched about DDR5, is that Alder Lake's IMC is still not good enough to push DDR5 faster. I'm expecting Raptor Lake to improve on this a lot, so we'll have to see if AMD can match Intel there, which I doubt, TBH. AMD has always had weaker IMCs due to several reasons.

Regards.
 
Last edited:
May 7, 2022
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unlike intel, am5 platform will hold for several years
And well AM4 is already a good spot for AMD. They actually beat Intel regularly just in performance alone (at least for gaming, they're definitely realigning with productivity this next gen) while being stuck on a DDR4 platform. AMD doesn't have a good reason to have DDR4 support in the 7000 series, maybe there might be DDR4 versions on the AM4 platform if rumors are true.
 

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