Asus Brings Its Tinker Board To North America

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The Snapdragon 835 apparently costs almost $50 on its own, so they clearly couldn't put something like that in a device around this price level.
 

bit_user

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You'll do a bit better with one of these:

http://www.hardkernel.com/main/products/prdt_info.php?g_code=G145457216438
Still A53 cores, I know, but a fair bit faster than the Pi 3 and similarly priced.

http://www.96boards.org/products/
These are more expensive, but you can get:

  • ■8x A53:
    http://www.96boards.org/product/hikey/
    ■2x A72 + 4x A53 + 4x A53:
    http://www.96boards.org/product/mediatek-x20/
    ■4x A57 in the form of AMD's Opteron A1100:
    http://www.96boards.org/product/cello/

AMD is supposed to release the K12, this year. No clue what socket it'll use. If it's big enough, maybe Naples'. Otherwise, it'd be cool if they went with AM4.

Anyway, I gave up on ARM, for the time being. I just bought an ASRock J4205-ITX to replace my Pi-based micro-server.

http://www.asrock.com/mb/Intel/J4205-ITX/index.us.asp

Sure, it burns more power than a Pi, but I can use a mainstream distro, I have a wide selection of cases (though I'd rather it were NUC/mini-STX form factor), and the graphics are fully-supported via both opensource and binary blob driver stacks. As for performance, it seems comparable to a similarly-clocked Core2 quad.

Maybe its replacement will be an ARM-based mini-ITX (or mini-STX). I thought it'd have happened by now, but I guess I was off by a couple years.
 

bit_user

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To the extent it's a fairly standard Debian distro, yes. I'm running Samba on my 1st generation Pi. Also miniDLNA, for streaming (not quite fast enough for video, thus my upgrade).
 

Tech_TTT

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I need it small and fast to use in DIY Robots Projects and DIY portable game consoles projects ... we need the fastest we can get.
 

bit_user

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Fast ain't a problem. And small? No problem. It'll cost you, though.

https://developer.nvidia.com/embedded-computing


In other news, the Goldmont-based Up^2 should start shipping in days: http://www.up-board.org/upsquared/

If you can trade some speed for size: http://www.up-board.org/upcore/

The original has been shipping for a while. Like Core, it's Silvermont-based: http://www.up-board.org/up/

For robotics, the x5-z8350 in Up and Up Core has 192 GFLOPS of fp32 compute power, making it probably the best tradeoff. Its cell phone-oriented CPU is also probably the most efficient. Sure, the Up^2 is faster, but you'll pay for it both in $ and in W.

Again, if you need to go cheaper, then the Odroid-C2 is worth a look.
 

bit_user

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I almost got the Up^2 to replace my Pi. Then, I realized that for its price, I could put together a full system (except SSD) around the ASRock J4205-ITX and went that route. It's a shame, because I really wanted something smaller than mini-ITX, but at least I got a few hundred extra MHz and more features on that board.
 

Tech_TTT

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I will gladly pay $30 more if they put this CPU instead of theirs :)
 

Tech_TTT

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Thanks for the info , I like the nvidia board . :)
 

Dirk_p_broer

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The Thinkerboard uses a quad-core, high-end ARM Cortex-A17, which is way better than a quad- or even octo-core low-to-middle-end ARM Cortex-A53 (especially when you are using a 32-bit OS).
 

bit_user

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I can't exactly say, but I usually refer to this:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_ARMv7-A_cores
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_ARMv8-A_cores

Which suggests a 1.78x advantage for the A17, if you compare quad cores at the same clock speed. So, it's not a big enough difference to outrun pretty much anything I listed except the Odroid C2, which I mostly put for completeness.

An A57 or A72 would beat it, clock for clock. And if we assume that DMIPS/MHz is for code at the native word length, then you might get an additional boost from the 64-bit cores on 32-bit code. That's usually the case, but sometimes architectures do really poorly at shorter word lengths, like the Pentium Pro, famously. But that was a long time ago and running 32-bit code is a major use-case for these guys, so I'd assume it's faster unless you have data to the contrary.
 
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