Question Automatic Repair Freeze on 'start up'

Mar 13, 2022
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I've tried several options found online...nothing works.

Problem started after everything froze and I could not use Task Manager to close anything. I had to hit the off button. I fear that might have corrupted some system files that were in use.

Now when I try to restart the screen FREEZES at Preparing Automatic Repair.

I can hit 'ftn/esc' key to get to a the HP Startup Menu screen (sometimes the Windows splash screen...not sure why one sometimes and the other othertimes) which offers:

F1 System information
F2 System Diagnostics (everything checks out fine!)
F9 Boot Device Option
F10 BIOS Setup
F11 System Recover
F12 Network Book.

Nothing works and apparently I do not have a way to rollback BIOS or go to a Restore Point...screen says they do not exist.

I have created a USB loaded the Windows 10 Home installation Media to try to boot from it. But cannot get that to work...hit 'f10' after going to Boot Order and choosing the USB option. But keeps going to HP splash screen and...freezing at the same point as before.

Computer Profile:
HP Envy Desktop
Windows 10 home (this I upgraded to via the free Microsoft option about 2 yrs ago)
Intel Core i7-6700
Boot Mode: UEFI with successful Secure Boot
Model: HP 750-427c 1.01
16 GB Memory


I want to be able to refresh or simply 'fix' this - not wiping the HD or data, so I can get into Windows and retrieve some data I did not backup to MS Onedrive....has 95% of what I need, but not the other 5% which I had created and have no back-up for. Live and learn...

If anyone could help, it would be appreciated...and if this should go under another form, just let me know.

Thanks,
Brian
 

dwd999

Honorable
I want to be able to refresh or simply 'fix' this - not wiping the HD or data, so I can get into Windows and retrieve some data I did not backup to MS Onedrive....has 95% of what I need, but not the other 5% which I had created and have no back-up for. Live and learn...
Last resort: try downloading a Linux Live distro (e.g. LinuxMint Mate or Ubuntu Mate) and burn that to a usb stick (e.g. rufus.ie) and try booting from that. If successful, you can use the file manager it provides to retrieve to essential files that you need from your HDD. If you can get all the files you need, then you may have to consider a complete reinstall of windows. You can use the Gparted app provided to delete all of the old partitions on your HDD and make sure its identified as a GPT partition drive. With all of the HDD space unallocated, a reinstall of windows should proceed smoothly.
 
Mar 13, 2022
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That's for that QUICK REPLY!

I'll keep that in mind as a true last resort. I have to say, I know nothing about "Linux Live distro" nor "Gparted" That said, yes, if I can get what I need, I'd happily reinstall Windows.

Never EVER had an issue with this 11 yr old laptop I'm using right now. :(
 

dwd999

Honorable
I'll keep that in mind as a true last resort. I have to say, I know nothing about "Linux Live distro" nor "Gparted" That said, yes, if I can get what I need, I'd happily reinstall Windows.
A linux live distro is an ISO format file you download from the website, e.g. LinuxMint.com, and burn onto a usb stick using rufus or a similar program. When you boot the usb you have a fully functional version of Linux without having to install anything or otherwise disturbing your HDD. There's a file manager included which will allow you to find and copy all of your essential files from your HDD. If you have no option other than a complete reinstall of windows, the Gparted app can be used to delete all of the old windows partitions on your HDD so that all of the space is unallocated, which is what the windows installer prefers. You can also use it to check that your HDD has a GPT partition identifier which windows prefers nowadays, allowing you to use the Secure Boot option which you should have in your laptop's bios.
 
Mar 13, 2022
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A linux live distro is an ISO format file you download from the website, e.g. LinuxMint.com, and burn onto a usb stick using rufus or a similar program. When you boot the usb you have a fully functional version of Linux without having to install anything or otherwise disturbing your HDD. There's a file manager included which will allow you to find and copy all of your essential files from your HDD. If you have no option other than a complete reinstall of windows, the Gparted app can be used to delete all of the old windows partitions on your HDD so that all of the space is unallocated, which is what the windows installer prefers. You can also use it to check that your HDD has a GPT partition identifier which windows prefers nowadays, allowing you to use the Secure Boot option which you should have in your laptop's bios.
Oh, it's not a laptop. it's an HP Envy Desktop.
What tests I was able to run suggest the HD, RAM, Video...everything fine.
 

dwd999

Honorable
Oh, it's not a laptop. it's an HP Envy Desktop.
What tests I was able to run suggest the HD, RAM, Video...everything fine.
If the HD is fine, can you retrieve all of your essential files from it? You may have to consider just wiping the HD and doing a complete reinstall of windows since you weren't able to repair it when you tried before.
 
Mar 13, 2022
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The system diagnostics said the HD was fine.

Odd, I am listening to an external speaker broadcasting from the laptop I am currently using and it is showing the pairing with the Desktop in question. For it, I see:

DESKTOP - SSTOUJI (its name)
Driver error

That may mean nothing though...
 

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