Bad cpu fan causing system shutdown split second after power on

mikepark

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I hesitate to post this because it has been addressed so many times (why I chose split second term), but don't quite see my question answered and some just drop the thread without saying what finally solved their problem (or even thanks). After posting I notice that I use HSF and cpu fan interchangeably. They mean the same in this post.

I built 2 identical computers for our church. Specs are below. Both passed the “smoke test” (HSF and case fans came on and I didn’t see or smell any smoke.) I loaded both computers in my truck (cab) and took them to the church, where I installed the mobo drivers and Win 8.1 on one of them. I came back the next day to repeat the procedure on the second one, but it exhibited the symptom so many others have described here (comes on very briefly and then shuts off). I brought both computers home to troubleshoot the dead one.

After double checking all the cables and connections and verifying that the panel (pwr & reset buttons, etc.) connections were identical, I swapped PSUs. One computer functioned with both PSUs, and one remained “dead” with both supplies. I then turned to this site and was surprised to see how many others had experienced this problem (and over many years). I read about a dozen of the threads until nothing new seemed to be showing up, and then reluctantly decided to try the “breadboard” approach. (That means something different to me). It sounds reasonable, although this is probably my 9th or 10th build and I’ve never needed it before.

I undid all my meticulous cable management, disconnected everything (wasn’t using a video card anyway), took out the 2 memory sticks and laid the bare mobo out on anti-static bags. My stocks of extra computer parts yielded a 2 wire connector I could slip onto the pins on the motherboard so I could send the start signal by touching the wires together, but I could not find a case speaker, so I’m working without any beep codes yet.

With the 24-pin and 8-pin power cables firmly seated, I applied power (touched the wires together). The HSF looked like it was “trying” to start. It moved about ¼ inch then stopped. The mobo has a (3 pin) cpu fan 2 connector, so I tried the cpu fan on that with the same results. I attached an old (but unused, since I don’t usually use stock cpu coolers) Intel cpu cooler to the cpu fan 1 connector on the motherboard and it worked fine. I only let it run for about a second for obvious reasons.
I said the fan looks like it’s “trying” to start, because it sort of quivers as it stops. So I tried starting it with my finger. That worked, but when it started it made a lot more noise than a cpu fan should and then it seemed to be slowing down, so I turned it off. It seems obvious to me that it is a faulty cpu fan. But the obvious answer isn’t always the right one, and although the case fans now come on, I didn't think they were before I took everything out of the case. So I’m asking the experts on this site if there could be something I have overlooked before I go back to Fry’s and try to get a replacement. Also, do you think I should demand a whole new cpu since all the testing I’ve done may have put too much heat stress on it?
Here are the specs (I only had a $700 budget, including the OS, so I picked up the parts as they went on sale)
CPU: Intel Core i5-4690K
Motherboard: ASRock H97M Pro4
SDRAM: 8 GB (2 x 4GB) Corsair Vengeance CMZ16GX3M4A1600C9 DDR3 1600
PSU: 430W Corsair CX430M ATX12V v2.3 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply
SSD: 250GB 840 Evo-
HDD: 500GB WD Black WD5000BPKX (SATA3 2.5")
Case: SilverStone SST-PS07B MicroATX

 


I've never bought a K series processor. Maybe these don't come with a stock cooler but most CPUs do. You can't use the over clocking capabilities with the H97 motherboard and whatever the church is doing with these PCs I doubt it needs top end processors. I would have bought something more like a Core i5 4460.

If you can return the cooler you have bought easily enough, they should test it themselves and replace it if defective. Your CPU should be OK providing you didn't try to power it on without a cooler installed since it has been powering down quickly. The CPU cooler heat sink should be able to dissipate this heat easily enough.

If you have damaged the CPU through your testing by powering it on with no cooler installed or through any physical damage, they probably aren't obliged to replace it under warranty. You could certainly try though if it turns out to be a problem. For now, just get the cooler replaced.
 

mikepark

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VincentP - Thanks for the comment. You say I "should be able to get it [the motherboard] working with the stock cooler...", but I don't know how I would do that. I don't think I could use the stock cooler I tested it with, since it's for an Intel Core 2 Duo, which I think uses an LGA775 socket and the Core i5 uses LGA 1150. Just eyeballing that cooler next too the motherboard, it doesn't look like it would fit. I could buy an after market cooler, but it seems like Fry's or Intel should replace it if it is defective. Also, I promised to deliver for $700 (to keep them from just running down to Office Depot and buying whatever the sales person said was a good deal), so anything over that I pay out of my pocket (and I passed that threshold a while back). Thanks in advance for any help you can give me.
 


I've never bought a K series processor. Maybe these don't come with a stock cooler but most CPUs do. You can't use the over clocking capabilities with the H97 motherboard and whatever the church is doing with these PCs I doubt it needs top end processors. I would have bought something more like a Core i5 4460.

If you can return the cooler you have bought easily enough, they should test it themselves and replace it if defective. Your CPU should be OK providing you didn't try to power it on without a cooler installed since it has been powering down quickly. The CPU cooler heat sink should be able to dissipate this heat easily enough.

If you have damaged the CPU through your testing by powering it on with no cooler installed or through any physical damage, they probably aren't obliged to replace it under warranty. You could certainly try though if it turns out to be a problem. For now, just get the cooler replaced.
 

mikepark

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mikepark

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Thanks for the advice, VincentP. Yeah, the cpu is way more than they need now and will probably will never be overclocked (esp w/ that mobo). I bought it first when it was on sale (a great price), then decided on the motherboard later. They were getting by with Athlon 64 4000+. Secretary and other users love their new computer.
I have another question, which can't be answered definitively, but I'd like your opinion. Intel agreed to replace the whole package (boxed cpu with cooler). I have to send it back at my expense and then wait 6-7 business days after they receive it to receive the replacement. That would give me a new cpu I wouldn't have to worry about being damaged, but I'm looking at another couple of weeks calendar time. I think the cpu should be OK, but I did turn it on twice for about a second each time. I could buy a better cooler for about $40, but I'd have to wait a few days on that, too. The pastor says he can wait a couple of weeks and I'm inclined to just go with the warranty replacement. What would you do?
 

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