Question Best way to squeeze performance out of 5600x?

Sep 24, 2020
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I've heard that overclocking the 5600x "sucks" compared to under volting so what I've done is I undervolted it in my motherboard for a -20 PBO curve on all cores.


So far it seems stable but I'd still get all the same performance as my max core clock is still the same. I primarily would like to game so just under volting isnt it.


Some people told me that its best to under volt it then apply some other stuff however I haven't been able to find any guides that go about this in depth other than one where someone just listed what values they use.


Basically I'm wondering what the best way to squeeze gaming performance out of my 5600x is. I've got a beefy cooler (Arctic 2 360) and a good motherboard (MSI Mag B550, Latest bios) so i'd like to squeeze as much performance out as possible without running into stability issues/greatly reducing the lifespan.
 

johnsoner13

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Nov 24, 2019
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Yah but that's just to undervolt it, There isn't a performance increase in games which is what im looking at.
Did you even watch, like, any of it? It runs cooler due to the undervolt and then boosts higher, achieving higher clocks. It performed better as youll see in the video if you care to watch it this time. Regardless, no matter how you tweak it, you’ll barely notice any changes in game performance.
 
Sep 24, 2020
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Did you even watch, like, any of it? It runs cooler due to the undervolt and then boosts higher, achieving higher clocks. It performed better as youll see in the video if you care to watch it this time. Regardless, no matter how you tweak it, you’ll barely notice any changes in game performance.
That video isnt really for gaming. I've watched it like 3 times now since every person linked it when I asked for help. I've found a video guide that seems to be more in-depth and better suited to what I want to do
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dU5qLJqTSAc
 

johnsoner13

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Nov 24, 2019
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That video isnt really for gaming. I've watched it like 3 times now since every person linked it when I asked for help. I've found a video guide that seems to be more in-depth and better suited to what I want to do
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dU5qLJqTSAc
Sigh.. please read before you decide to respond
Regardless, no matter how you tweak it, you’ll barely notice any changes in game performance.
No matter what you do you wont get noticeable results in gaming. Also “that video isnt really for gaming” the tuning process is pretty much the same... why do you think the video keeps getting recommended lmao
 
Sep 24, 2020
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Sigh.. please read before you decide to respond

No matter what you do you wont get noticeable results in gaming. Also “that video isnt really for gaming” the tuning process is pretty much the same... why do you think the video keeps getting recommended lmao
The optimums tech video seems vastly oversimplified. All he did was say to lower your voltage curve down to -30 and if that does not work then set it to -25 etc..

I was asking how to get the most performance out of the CPU and the process that the video use isnt close to the same? The one I found has the guy include EDC/TDC and also the max CPU boost clock override (Which granted has minimal impacts but its still better to squeeze preformance out of)

Point is if I just followed the Optimum tech video all I would know to do is to set my curve to -30 on all cores then if that dooes not work reduce it by -5 then repeat.
 

johnsoner13

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Nov 24, 2019
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The optimums tech video seems vastly oversimplified. All he did was say to lower your voltage curve down to -30 and if that does not work then set it to -25 etc..

I was asking how to get the most performance out of the CPU and the process that the video use isnt close to the same? The one I found has the guy include EDC/TDC and also the max CPU boost clock override (Which granted has minimal impacts but its still better to squeeze preformance out of)

Point is if I just followed the Optimum tech video all I would know to do is to set my curve to -30 on all cores then if that dooes not work reduce it by -5 then repeat.
The process is the same, the values are different. Optimum tech removed the limits youre talking about while the video you found just set them manually. The max boost clock override is already taken care of because of the undervolt/curve optimizer and it automatically boosts higher. Youre just doing everything manually pretty much and because you see fancy numbers and values you think it’s better. Meanwhile you can get the same results with curve optimizer
 
Sep 24, 2020
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The process is the same, the values are different. Optimum tech removed the limits youre talking about while the video you found just set them manually. The max boost clock override is already taken care of because of the undervolt/curve optimizer and it automatically boosts higher. Youre just doing everything manually pretty much and because you see fancy numbers and values you think it’s better. Meanwhile you can get the same results with curve optimizer
I did follow the steps by steps shown exactly in the video and my core clock speed was still maxing out at 4.65Ghz though which either means that its not the same or he did some other step off-camera (which he did not).

I've even watched the video now and in his 5600x his clock frequency maxes out at 4.65Ghz which is exactly the same as the stock number. The CPU does not "automatically boost higher" than 4.65Ghz
 

johnsoner13

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Nov 24, 2019
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I did follow the steps by steps shown exactly in the video and my core clock speed was still maxing out at 4.65Ghz though which either means that its not the same or he did some other step off-camera (which he did not).

I've even watched the video now and in his 5600x his clock frequency maxes out at 4.65Ghz which is exactly the same as the stock number. The CPU does not "automatically boost higher" than 4.65Ghz
Yes youre right. Except for max boost clock override its the exact same
 

johnsoner13

Notable
Nov 24, 2019
505
93
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I did follow the steps by steps shown exactly in the video and my core clock speed was still maxing out at 4.65Ghz though which either means that its not the same or he did some other step off-camera (which he did not).

I've even watched the video now and in his 5600x his clock frequency maxes out at 4.65Ghz which is exactly the same as the stock number. The CPU does not "automatically boost higher" than 4.65Ghz
Either way, all that work is for no noticeable difference
 

dorsai

Distinguished
I've heard that overclocking the 5600x "sucks" compared to under volting so what I've done is I undervolted it in my motherboard for a -20 PBO curve on all cores.


So far it seems stable but I'd still get all the same performance as my max core clock is still the same. I primarily would like to game so just under volting isnt it.


Some people told me that its best to under volt it then apply some other stuff however I haven't been able to find any guides that go about this in depth other than one where someone just listed what values they use.


Basically I'm wondering what the best way to squeeze gaming performance out of my 5600x is. I've got a beefy cooler (Arctic 2 360) and a good motherboard (MSI Mag B550, Latest bios) so i'd like to squeeze as much performance out as possible without running into stability issues/greatly reducing the lifespan.

I feel there are two camps of thought on overclocking Ryzen 5600x.

The first will maximize cooling, disable PBO and power saving features, and set a fixed clock-speed for all cores at the lowest voltage possible. I think this is likely the best method of the two for people only concerned with fps in games as a fixed all core overclock should provide the best overall gaming result. Focus on keeping the chip as cool as possible at the lowest voltage possible and let it rip. Once a good over-clock is found the only issue becomes chip longevity...as these are new chips nobody really knows how fast they might degrade from a 24/7 overclock.

The second camp falls into the curve optimizer undervolt group. That group wants to control heat as well as optimize cpu performance by opening up the max possible clocks the cpu will run if allowed to do things using its internal algorithm balancing voltage, temps, and clock-speed. By opening up the limits placed on the cpu and not forcing it to a fixed clock, this group is looking for Ryzen to show its stuff using the same method AMD uses but with higher limits and lower initial voltage. The only issue here is really stability as AMD likely would have done much of this themselves if the chips were all stable doing this. Longevity shouldn't be as much of a concern here as the chip is only boosting to those now hopefully higher clocks when processor workload requires it...and even then the voltages are generally as good or lower than stock under full load.

I don't think both methods work particularly well together which trips up many Ryzen users looking to over-clock. If you're looking for an overclock to maximize gaming go for a fixed 24/7 over-clock. If you're looking to optimize the cpu to runs its best without the downsides of a 24/7 over-clock then undervolting and curve optimizing is probably your best bet.


There is a third option, which I recommend, which is to simply provide good cooling at stock clocks and let the 5600x do its algorithm thing...while focusing on tweaking memory timings and IF speeds to maximize Ryzens performance.
 
Sep 24, 2020
29
1
35
0
I feel there are two camps of thought on overclocking Ryzen 5600x.

The first will maximize cooling, disable PBO and power saving features, and set a fixed clock-speed for all cores at the lowest voltage possible. I think this is likely the best method of the two for people only concerned with fps in games as a fixed all core overclock should provide the best overall gaming result. Focus on keeping the chip as cool as possible at the lowest voltage possible and let it rip. Once a good over-clock is found the only issue becomes chip longevity...as these are new chips nobody really knows how fast they might degrade from a 24/7 overclock.

The second camp falls into the curve optimizer undervolt group. That group wants to control heat as well as optimize cpu performance by opening up the max possible clocks the cpu will run if allowed to do things using its internal algorithm balancing voltage, temps, and clock-speed. By opening up the limits placed on the cpu and not forcing it to a fixed clock, this group is looking for Ryzen to show its stuff using the same method AMD uses but with higher limits and lower initial voltage. The only issue here is really stability as AMD likely would have done much of this themselves if the chips were all stable doing this. Longevity shouldn't be as much of a concern here as the chip is only boosting to those now hopefully higher clocks when processor workload requires it...and even then the voltages are generally as good or lower than stock under full load.

I don't think both methods work particularly well together which trips up many Ryzen users looking to over-clock. If you're looking for an overclock to maximize gaming go for a fixed 24/7 over-clock. If you're looking to optimize the cpu to runs its best without the downsides of a 24/7 over-clock then undervolting and curve optimizing is probably your best bet.


There is a third option, which I recommend, which is to simply provide good cooling at stock clocks and let the 5600x do its algorithm thing...while focusing on tweaking memory timings and IF speeds to maximize Ryzens performance.
What i'm doing is I've set the max boost overclock to +50 and im going to tune my curve tuning down to the max (right now -20 at all cores and a +50 boost seems stable) I guess this method is a lot closer to the second one as the clock speed isnt fixed.
 

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