Question Bottleneck

jeffreygian360

Commendable
Sep 19, 2018
231
30
1,640
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And we're going to need some quotes or links on this.
I do not remember from where i sourced it but i remember what it was said that due to the pci compatibility the pc wont boot ik not a concrete detail but even today i saw in one of the post mentioned that on an old mobo the uefi is fussy and many wont be able to boot check the forum 'RX 550-old mobo' one of the ambassador- status has mentioned it maybe you might not find me reliable but sure you'll find that ambassador
 
I do know that some R9*s and most (all?) RX cards from AMD won't work on a Dell XPS 8300 (Sandy Bridge) because, if I understand what I've read from the Dell message boards correctly, the newer AMD cards don't support VESA mode 103, which the old "DOS-looking" screen modes for the BIOS use.

I think UEFI systems, regardless of vintage, were immune to this because they all use another video mode.

* some R9 cards came with a UEFI/Legacy switch on them that would let them work on such a system.

My own experience was only with a Gigabyte Windforce R9 285, on an Dell XPS 8300. No UEFI update for the BIOS was available. The system wouldn't boot, but would just stay blank, and the LED on the power switch would stay orange (as if it were in standby or power save mode).

The same card worked fine on my XPS 8700 (Haswell era).


I can't speak to OEM type systems other than Dell on this matter. Or, if the motherboard is one that was purchased for a custom build rather than an OEM board. I don't know what year UEFI became widespread.
 

jeffreygian360

Commendable
Sep 19, 2018
231
30
1,640
9
I do know that some R9*s and most (all?) RX cards from AMD won't work on a Dell XPS 8300 (Sandy Bridge) because, if I understand what I've read from the Dell message boards correctly, the newer AMD cards don't support VESA mode 103, which the old "DOS-looking" screen modes for the BIOS use.

I think UEFI systems, regardless of vintage, were immune to this because they all use another video mode.

* some R9 cards came with a UEFI/Legacy switch on them that would let them work on such a system.

My own experience was only with a Gigabyte Windforce R9 285, on an Dell XPS 8300. No UEFI update for the BIOS was available. The system wouldn't boot, but would just stay blank, and the LED on the power switch would stay orange (as if it were in standby or power save mode).

The same card worked fine on my XPS 8700 (Haswell era).


I can't speak to OEM type systems other than Dell on this matter. Or, if the motherboard is one that was purchased for a custom build rather than an OEM board. I don't know what year UEFI became widespread.
Thanks for info i had read sometimes back about this kind of similar issue wasnt so elaborative as yours i have a pc from 2009 i might be wrong but PC's after 2012 most probably uefi were becoming widespread or were started my mobo has no uefi compatibility and gigabyte never completed it and its atill in beta however thank you for your descriptive info it helped me alot:)
 
Well, more that AMD stopped supporting VESA mode 103 in their cards, thus legacy hangs up on it. According to a post at those same forums:

Class 1 Dell bios requires DOS VESA Video mode 103 in order to post and get into F2 cmos setup.
The Nvidia 10-series cards work in the XPS 8300, not sure about the 16-series. The same thread does say that the RTX cards won't work in the XPS 8300 because UEFI class 2.3.1 is required.

https://www.dell.com/community/XPS-Desktops/XPS-8300-GTX-1080-Ti-upgrade-2019/td-p/7384859
 
Aug 28, 2020
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Thanks for your help.
I was thinking about buying nvidia, but my motherboard doesnt support many budget cards.
It supports the 4 gb version of 460, but it would bottleneck my processor.
Motherboard- GA-G41M-ES2l
 
Last edited:

tennis2

Honorable
You mean the processor will bottleneck the 4gb rx 460? Or?
Yes
Are you talking about the 2gb version?
More than likely.

There are plenty of GPU reviews on the net using much faster CPUs than a Q9400. So, once you get your GPU, check for a few games you own/play and compare difference in performance. Also, if you consistently see less than.....85% GPU usage in-game, you're CPU-limited.
 
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