Budget Gaming PC warcraft advise wanted UK

Nov 4, 2018
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I'm Looking to buy or build a budget gaming pc under £300 the cheaper the better, I just want it to play World of Warcraft BoA. I don't generally raid, but I do like to pvp when I get drunk, I most definitely wont be streaming or anything fancy.
My current pc is really really bad

Processor: Intel core 2 duo cpu E4600 @ 2.40ghz
ram 2gb
32 bit operating system, x64 based processor
Nvidia GeForce 8400GS

I managed to play legion, but the stuttering was terrible.

I would appreciate helpful answers only no abuse, I'm an older lady so pretend your talking to your fav auntie.
Thanks for your time.
I'm in the U.k , I'm not averse to building a pc if that's a cheaper option.
 

groo

Distinguished
Feb 3, 2008
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I'd probably pick up something used, maybe a refurbish office computer as a starting point, then add graphics, along with PSU and memory as needed.
If you have a halfway decent case already, you can get the half height office computers cheaper and move the guts over.
By starting with something that already works, you have a baseline for a functional machine and it comes with an OS and HDD already.
If you buy everything and it doesn't work, what the next step? could be almost anything that is faulty.
 
This should do... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gqA1Oqrw_Co

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 3 2200G 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor (£86.39 @ Aria PC)
Motherboard: MSI - B450M PRO-VDH Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard (£64.99 @ Amazon UK)
Memory: Team - Vulcan 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-3000 Memory (£66.14 @ CCL Computers)
Case: Thermaltake - Versa H22 ATX Mid Tower Case (£33.90 @ Amazon UK)
Power Supply: Corsair - CXM (2015) 450W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply (£47.99 @ Amazon UK)
Total: £299.41
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-11-04 09:50 GMT+0000


Format and reuse your current HDD.
Activate Windows later on. Doest affect performance... https://www.howtogeek.com/244678/you-dont-need-a-product-key-to-install-and-use-windows-10/
 

groo

Distinguished
Feb 3, 2008
964
0
18,990
1
I'd probably pick up something used, maybe a refurbish office computer as a starting point, then add graphics, along with PSU and memory as needed.
If you have a halfway decent case already, you can get the half height office computers cheaper and move the guts over.
By starting with something that already works, you have a baseline for a functional machine and it comes with an OS and HDD already.
If you buy everything and it doesn't work, what the next step? could be almost anything that is faulty.
 

logainofhades

Titan
Moderator
Problem with OEM rigs, are the motherboards are proprietary, and don't work in standard cases, and some with standard power supplies, so I would try to avoid slim cases. If you do get a slim case, you are going to be limited to something like a low profile GT 1030, maybe a 1050. Personally, I would save up a couple hundred more, and get something more usable. Dell Outlet UK had a rig with an i3 8100, and a GTX 1050, for like 480.
 

groo

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Feb 3, 2008
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18,990
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I know that has been true in the past, but not so much in the past 10 years from my experience. why would you make a non-standard board? it would require all sorts of non-standard components that only increase manufacturing costs. Why would a board manufacturer want to make custom tooling for company x, and more custom tooling for company Y, and then of course the other sets of tooling with different sizes, etc...its just so much easy to do some surface customization and slap in a custom bios. It would save quite a bit at the end of the day. Anything custom will cost more than standard production, and there would be no gain to it.
Even if you have a board that requires a custom PSU, there are usually adapters. I am not sure if that is still a thing or not.

Even is such a build would end up being stuck with a low-profile, a 4gb 1050 ti would be plenty of graphics muscle for these uses.
 

logainofhades

Titan
Moderator
Lenovo uses proprietary PSU's. Dell tends to use proprietary motherboards. HP has been known to do such things as well. At one time, E-Machines used standard M-ATX hardware, but I think even eventually they changed to proprietary stuff. OEM's don't want you upgrading. They want you to come back and buy a shiny new rig.
 

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