[SOLVED] Can i cool a cpu and gpu at the same time without a custom water loop?

May 13, 2019
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Hello , so what's basically the problem that , i want to get the rx 5700xt and r5 3600x , and i want to overclocks voth components . For the cpu i already have nzxt x62 but i dont know if its possible to water cool the gpu and cpu in the same case using different coolers not like having a custom loop. it is possible for a h500i case to make it fit? or any other solution for keeping low temps to the gpu while overclocking ?
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
You can install AIO liquid coolers on GPUs... but compatibility can be a little tough.
NZXT's G12 is one option: https://www.nzxt.com/products/kraken-g12-white

But I don't know if it'll be strictly compatible with a 5700Xt - too early to tell.

You've filled the front 280mm compatibility, so you'd be limited to a rear mounted 120mm AIO if you went that route. Typically, a 120mm AIO is enough for a GPU (it's what the 'hybrid' offerings ship with, afterall).

HOWEVER, it might be worth waiting for AIB variants of the 5700XT - there will almost certainly be a 'hybrid' offering. Given the G12 is ~$30 and a compatible AIO is probably going to set you back ~$60, if not a little more..... pricing on a true hybrid card might come in around the same overall pricepoint.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
The G10/G12 is a short-cut. A bandaid. It's a good idea for sure, but uses a fan and supplied stick on heatsinks to cool the VRM's and the aio pump attaches to the actual graphics processor.

A true hybrid design is almost the same, except it uses a full length heatsink, with an additional aio for the processor, which offers better overall cooling potential for the full card, and comes with the factory warranty that covers everything. The plus side being you don't have to worry about compatability or tearing apart a fully functional gpu to add parts. Human error is brutal.
 
May 13, 2019
89
0
30
0
You can install AIO liquid coolers on GPUs... but compatibility can be a little tough.
NZXT's G12 is one option: https://www.nzxt.com/products/kraken-g12-white

But I don't know if it'll be strictly compatible with a 5700Xt - too early to tell.

You've filled the front 280mm compatibility, so you'd be limited to a rear mounted 120mm AIO if you went that route. Typically, a 120mm AIO is enough for a GPU (it's what the 'hybrid' offerings ship with, afterall).

HOWEVER, it might be worth waiting for AIB variants of the 5700XT - there will almost certainly be a 'hybrid' offering. Given the G12 is ~$30 and a compatible AIO is probably going to set you back ~$60, if not a little more..... pricing on a true hybrid card might come in around the same overall pricepoint.
so do you think that airflow may be affected? , also by putting the 120mm at the rear , it should be installed as exhaust? or intake? does that what i mentioned even mind ?
 
May 13, 2019
89
0
30
0
The G10/G12 is a short-cut. A bandaid. It's a good idea for sure, but uses a fan and supplied stick on heatsinks to cool the VRM's and the aio pump attaches to the actual graphics processor.

A true hybrid design is almost the same, except it uses a full length heatsink, with an additional aio for the processor, which offers better overall cooling potential for the full card, and comes with the factory warranty that covers everything. The plus side being you don't have to worry about compatability or tearing apart a fully functional gpu to add parts. Human error is brutal.
so final conclusion?
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Rear-exhaust. Top-exhaust. Front-intake. Up to you whether the fans are push mounted or pull mounted. With rgb/led fans, push tends to look better, you actually see the fan, but non lighted fans work slightly better at lower rpm in pull, the added advantage is no fan in the way when cleaning the radiator, no dust donut.
 
May 13, 2019
89
0
30
0
The G10/G12 is a short-cut. A bandaid. It's a good idea for sure, but uses a fan and supplied stick on heatsinks to cool the VRM's and the aio pump attaches to the actual graphics processor.

A true hybrid design is almost the same, except it uses a full length heatsink, with an additional aio for the processor, which offers better overall cooling potential for the full card, and comes with the factory warranty that covers everything. The plus side being you don't have to worry about compatability or tearing apart a fully functional gpu to add parts. Human error is brutal.
so basically i should wait until hybrid models like rtx 2080 ti , arrives to the market.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Final conclusion? I'd wait to see exactly what your options will be. A true hybrid has advantages in build and warranty, an add-on like the G12 has advantages in price. You might get a killer deal on any card that's not a hybrid, so the additional expense for the aio/adapter will be lower overall. If it fits.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Hmm. Ever look at a full blown hard tube setup with immaculate bends, perfectly level piping that's both neat and orderly? You get a serious amount of appreciation for exactly how much work, pride, blood, sweat and tears has gone into that build. There's nothing else quite like it. Most ppl can do soft tube loops, if they apply more than 3 brain cells to the project and do the research on the rules and tips etc, but a solid hard tube build is a whole different level of expertise.


Some to drool over.
 

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